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Full text of "Town Topics (Princeton), Oct. 10, 1979"

Debate Continues in Township Hall over 
Control of Loitering 3 

Controversial "Slope Ordinance" Results 
in Suit against Princeton Township 3 

Woodrow Wilson's Grandson to Preach 
in University Chapel Sunday 26 

Mayoralty Candidates in Borough Ponder 
Issues in Current Race 1 B 

Rarely-Seen Brecht Drama Fails to Impress 
as McCarter Season Opens 2B 

Princeton Football Team Plans to Improve 
1-2 Record at Columbia's Expense . . 14B 



VOL. XXXIV, NO. 31 



Wednesday, October 1 0. 1 979 



25' At All Newsstands 



Shopping Center Seeking to Lower 
Its Tax Assessment by $1.2 Million 

Princeton Shopping Center, the Township's largest 
commercial taxpayer, is seeking to have its 
assessment reduced by $1 2 million. The appeal will 
be heard this Wednesday at 1 at the Mercer County 
Board ot Taxation, 643 South Broad Street, Trenton. 

The Shopping Center is asking a reduction of the 
assessed value of its land and buildings from 
$3,362,600. an assessment made in 1971, to 
$2,1 00,1 00. The difference is $1 ,262,600 and could 
mean a loss in tax revenue of $52,524.16 af this 
year's tax rate of $4.16. The Shopping Center's tax 
bill for 1979 is $139,884.1 6. 

According to Assessor Stuart Robson, this is not 
the first time that the Shopping Center has sought to 
have its assessment reduced. Two years ago, he 
said, an appeal was initiated, but the appellants did 
not appear for the hearing and the case was 
dismissed. 

Mr. Robson explained that there are three ap- 
proaches used in determing the value of property for 
assessment purposes. The first, the one he generally 
uses, is to take the cost of the building, plus the 
value of the land, less depreciation. Another method 
is to use market data from the sales of comarable 
property to derive a unit value per square fooi. 

A third approach, which he thinks is the one on 
which the Shopping Center is basing its appeal, is the 
income approach in which the total revenue from 
rentals, minus expenses, results in a net figure on 
which the capitalization rate of return is based. For 
shopping centers a capitalization rate of 1 3.6 percent 
is typical, he said. 

"We took into consideration the income stream of 
the Shopping Center when we made our appraisal in 
1971," Mr. Robson said. "We feel we have a solid 
case in that a special effort was made to see that all 
assessments were done in an equitable manner and 
with the same procedures as much as humanly 
possible." The Shopping Center complaint cites 
"Discrimination" as the reason for its appeal. 

Township Committee approved an emergency 
resolution last Wednesday night to appropriate 
$3,000 to hire an expert to assist Edwin W. Sch- 
mierer of Mason, Griffin & Pierson, Township at- 
torneys, in responding to the appeal That money 
then must be part of the 1 980 budget and is subject 
to the cap law. The expert will be Joseph Martin of 
Trenton. 

The Shopping Center is owned by George War- 
necke and managed by Harold Goldberg & Co , 
managing and leasing agents. Harold Kuskin of the 
West Orange law firm Lesser, Sarokin & Hochman, 
which is handling the appeal for the Shopping Center, 
said that his firm's analysis of rental income and 
expenses indicates that "the Shopping Center is over 
assessed We hope we will receive some reduction 
and think the Shopping Center is entitled to it," he 
said. 

According to Mr Robson, Woolworth's on Nassau 
Street is seeking a similar reduction based on similar 
reasoning. The Woolworfh property, under the 

S c °""" UM0 " n "' M " t 



Temporary Ruling by Superior Court Judge Opens 
Gates for Union Workers at PHS Construction Site 



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Workers were back on the weed- 
grown Princeton High School 
construction site Tuesday after a 
five-month absence. 

Joyous school officials heard 
Superior Court Judge Morton 
Greenberg declare on Friday that he 
was issuing a temporary restraining 
order requiring Local 269 of the 
International Brotherhood of 
Electrical Workers to remove their 
informational pickets from the 
Walnut Lane construction gates. 

The effect of the removal was to 
open the gates for union workers 
who have refused to cross the 
picket line. Presumably, they would 
have gone back to work Monday, 
except for the holiday. 

School board and union must go 
back to Judge Greenberg this 
Friday for an evidentiary hearing. 
After that, the judge will decide 
whether the temporary order should 
continue until conclusion of the suit 
brought by the board against Local 
269. The suit seeks whatever 
damages may accrue as a result of 
the work stoppage. 

The work stoppage began in May. 
One of the school board's con- 
tractors for the high school 



remodeling job is Jaden Electric, a 
non-union firm. Local 269 placed its 
informational pickets at the site in an 
effort to unionize Jaden employees, 
and employees of other contractors, 
all of whom are unionized, declined 
to cross the line. 

The union claimed that Judge 
Greenberg had no jurisdiction in the 
case. The judge ruled that his court 
did have jurisdiction because, in his 
view, Local 269 had unlawfully 
interfered with the contract between 
Jaden Electric and the school board. 

That contract, the court found, 
was consistent with "the highest 
governmental purpose: the con- 
stitutional assurance of a thorough 
and efficient education for all 
children in the district." 

Judge Greenberg also found that 
the board, in awarding Jaden the 
contract, was in conformance with 
state legislative policy of assuring 
economies to taxpayers. 

Under New Jersey law, a school 
board must accept the lowest, 
qualified bidder, and Jaden was. 

Rule Construction, the general 
contractor *iad workers back on the 
job Tuesday, but it was hard for 
school officials and Joel Spaeth, 



architect for the project, to tell just 
who was back and who was not. 

"They probably won't be fully 
mobilized until next week," Mr. 
Spaeth said. "Rule is the one that 
sets the schedule, as general 
contractor." 

Mr. Spaeth added, with a smile, "I 
just can't get over it! This is the first 
positive thing that's happened in a 
long time." 

PHS Principal John Sakala said 
on Tuesday that he hadn't yet had 
an opportunity to meet with the 
contractors and his staff to decide 
what things are most important to 
do first - the new gym, classrooms 
or other projects. Work is inter- 
connected, Mr. Sakala pointed out, 
and related to the weather. It may be 
too late, for example, to get back to 
work on the new gym, whose 
skeletonal framework has watched 
over the idle site. 

The school board was scheduled 
to meet Tuesday night in closed 
session - allowed under the sun- 
shine law where litigation is in- 
volved - to confer with lawyer 
James McLaughlin and decide what 
steps to take next. 

■Katharine H. Bretnall 



Wallack Seeking Council Seat to Be Vacated by Leona Medvin 



The resignation of a Council mem- 
ber, a new contract with the police 
union, concern about revaluation 
and formal appointment of a new 
police sergeant occupied Borough 
Council in a brief, but newsworthy 
session Tuesday night. 

Leona Medvin announced that 
she is resigning her Council seat 
effective this Saturday Mrs. Medvin 
was married this summer to Herman 
Farber, and is moving to Rossmoor. 

She has been on Council almost 
three years. She ran successfully as 
an independent three years ago to 
fill out the term of her late first 
husband. Murray Medvin. Two 
years ago, she was re-elected as a 
Democrat and her term has one 
year to run. 

New Jersey law states that 15 
days after a seat is vacant, the local 
municipal committee of the political 
party in question, must produce 
three candidates for the seat. That 
makes the deadline Oct. 28. If the 
municipal committee is unable to do 



this. Council, itself, selects a re- 
placement from the same party as 
the one which held the seat. In this 
case, Council has until Nov. 1 3. 

Alan Wallack who ran un- 
successfully last year for Council, is 
chairman of the Borough 
Democrats' municipal committee. 
He said this week that he has called 
a meeting for 9 p.m. next Monday, 
and has fold members of fhe 
municipal committee that he wants 
to be considered for the vacancy. 

Timing makes the committee's 
choice an interesting one. The 15 
days expires before election 
Presumably, none of the three Dem- 
ocratic candidates now running for 
Council would want, at this time, to 
be considered. Yet, a candidate 
who loses in November might 
welcome the appointment. 

In brief words of farewell, Mrs. 
Medvin said, "I will always be 
deeply concerned with the Princeton 
community, and will always be part 
of the town, I've lived here 25 years, 



and I'll be coming back to shop and 
take my shoes to the shoemaker!" 

Mayor Robert W. Cawley praised 
her "good sense, humor and 
committment," and Council pre- 
sented her with a pin. 

Mrs. Medvin has also announced 
that she is retiring from fhe Prin- 
ceton Regional School system in 
May. She has been teaching at 
Littlebrook School. 

Revaluation will probably not be 
completed in time to be applied to 
1980 taxes, and in fact, im- 
plementation may be deferred until 
next year, reported Richard Macgill, 
Council finance chairman. 

Although PRC Jacobs. Inc.. the 
appraisal firm, started on lime and 
expected to have fhe job done by 
now, it became apparent late this 
summer that the conversion factor 
supplied by the state for Mercer 
County, did not fit the Princeton area 
- either Borough or Township. Sfuart 
Robeson, tax assessor for both 



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COME SI DICE IN INGLESE? Or, how do you say It in English? is the concern of 
Mary Ann Mosso (left), teacher of English as a Second Language, Arlene Berman. 
YWCA Adult Program Director, and Ralph Plrone, President of the Italian - 
American Sportsmen's Club. They are involved in bringing a program of con- 
versational English instruction for those whose native tongue is Italian to the 
Italian- American Sportsmen's Center. "'"": """•-'""'"' 



TO TEACH ENGLISH 
At Italian-American Club. 
The YWCA is seeking to 
provide those who speak """S^lk 
primarily Italian with an smensClub 
opportunity to have English 



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conjunction with the Dorothea 
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at the Italian-American e'8 hl week program is $15. 
Sportsmen's Club on Terhune Neither a YWCA membership 
Road. The English as a second nor a membership in the 
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INDEX 

Art in Princeton 8B 

Business News 24 

Calendar of the Week 5B 

Classified Ads 28-48 

ClubNews 9B 

Current Cinema 3B 

Engagements 12B 

It'sNewtoUs 10B 

Mailbox 22 

Music in Princeton 6B 

Obituaries 20 

People in the News 19 

Religion in Princeton 26 

Senior Activities 6B 

Sports 14B-20B 

Theatres 2B 

Topics of the Town 3 

Weather Box 4 



ceton, no vacant land is that 
expensive. 

15-year old assessment figures "The Princeton Factor." 
still used by the Borough, is After extensive discussion and 
valued at $148,200 (land) and reviews of real estate sales 
$116,200 (building) for a total and local building costs, Mr. 
of $264,400. Taxes are Macgill reported, a new 
$15,996.20 "Princeton factor" has been 

The company wants its developed. A sampling of 
assessment cut in half, and Pr op | r 'i eS lS K°l. l "ri er ^ 
took its case to the rnuntv ■* Robeson hopes for a true 
looK us case to the county -^ f ^ relationship 
board in 1977 The Borough ^een land and buildings, so 
was upheld and Woolworth ma t the town will be revalued 
then appealed to the state. a t 100 percent of true value as 

The Woolworth building is of this October 1. 
owned by Donald Vinik of Council member Martin P. 
Coral Gables, Florida. Lombardo demanded the 
Woolworth is represented by removal of the PRC Jacobs 
ime law firm that is ffi™. . cha/Bing that it had 



handling 
Shopping Cente 



nceton 



appeal. 



Borough Council 



'tarnished our credibility. 

"Home owners say uie 
people hired by the firm didn't 
even enter the house, in many 
cases," Mr. Lombardo 
declared. "And many people 
told me the Jacobs people 

municipalities, discovered the were not qualified. We were 

situation in a random check. promised our new bills before 
Housing prices in both the election - this company has 

Princetons are so different damaged its credibility and 

from everywhere else in the 

county that whole factor was 

skewed. For example, in some 

instances land values turned 

out to be three times the value 

of a house and even in Prin- 



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When Mr. Lombardo moved 
to summon PRC Jacobs 
before Council for an ac- 
counting, nobody seconded the 
motion. 

"The delay is troublesome 
to all of us, Mayor Cawley 
said. "Stu Robeson is the one 
who is handling this, and I am 
not dissatisfied with what he's 
done. Calling Jacobs in would 
be taking an unfair shot at 
Robeson. ' 

Mr. Macgill explained that 
New Jersey, itself, had caused 
the problem, and might have 
realized earlier that its data 



were inadequate. 

A new one-year contract 
with the Patrolmen's 
Benevolent Association gives 
police officers a 5' 2 percent 
raise, improved medical 
benefits and a 40-hour week, 
instead of 42. This brings the 
average work week in line 
with that of the Townshipforce 
explained police commis- 
sioner Richard Woodbridge. 

Det. Timothy Huising was 
approved for promotion to 
sergeant. He replaces Sgt 
Robert J. Anderson retiring 
from the department after 32 
years of service. 

— Katharine H. Bretnall 





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LITTERING. LOITERING 

One Passes. Other 
Deferred. Littering and 
loitering converged last 
Wednesday night as Township 
Committee held public 
hearings and sought to pass 
ordinances pertaining to each. 

The litter ordinance, having 
to do with trash around 
commercial property, passed 
without discussion; the 
loitering ordinance drew 
plenty of comment, and 
passage was deferred until 
this Wednesday's meeting at 8 
in Township Hall. 

On hand to present ob- 
jections to the passage of a 
greatly revised version of the 
loitering ordinance were 
Estelle Kuhn and Judith 
Marciano of the American 
Civil Liberties Union; Bar- 
bara Diamond, an attorney; 
and Margaret Broadwater, 
former Township Committee 
woman. Ail except Mrs. 
Broadwater spoke in objection 
to passage of the ordinance in 
general and to the section 
which gives a police officer 
power to disperse a crowd if 
he "observes physical 
evidence which leads him to 
believe an offense has oc- 
curred" in particular. 

Mrs. Kuhn termed the 
wording here "vague, highly 
discretionary and punitive." A 
police officer could arrive on a 
scene, she said, see broken 
glass, not know who had 
broken it, and an innocent 
person could be drawn to the 
scene, refuse to disperse when 
the officer asked all to leave 
and could be arrested, She 
also objected to the complaint 
clause which she felt could 
allow for malicious com- 
plaints. 

Complaints Are Numerous. 

Chief Frederick Porter said 
that in the period between 
March 3 and September 6 
there were 31 complaints on 
the police docket pertaining to 



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activities of groups of youth in 
the Shopping Center and only 
one of those was anonymous 
David Blair said that was not 
the point; to file a complaint a 
citizen had to sign his or her 
name to it. 

"This is a law you write 
when you don't know how to 
handle a situation," Mrs. 
Kuhn said, "when in fact it 
may not be handleable." Mrs. 
Diamond urged the Township 
to consider more police patrol 
of the area in lieu of passing 
an ordinance which she felt 
violated both the First and 
Fifth Amendments. 

In response to a question 
from Committee member 
Hugo Hoogenboom as to 
whether indeed the ordinance 
was vague and dis- 
criminatory, Gordon Griffin, 
Township attorney, replied 
that he felt a little like 
Rip Van Winkle. 

"When I was last here," he 
said, "there was an ordinance 
carefully drafted to comply 
with the DeMarco decision. I 
see before me an ordinance 
that bears no resemblance to 
it." Mr. Griffin asked to have 
a week to study the revised 
version and two amendments 
proposed by William Cherry. 

In other matters. Com- 
mittee passed a bond or- 
dinance in the amount of 
$438,000 for repairs and 
alterations to Township Hall, 
the Annex and the old wing of 
Valley Road School Building 
to which Township offices 
expect to move when the 
renovations are complete. Mr. 
Cherry raised the question of 
consolidation, but was assured 
by Mayor Josie Hall that 
"Consolidation or no con- 
solidation, the space and 
renovation are needed and the 
heating plant has to be fixed 
regardless." 

Committee set October 17 as 
the date for the public hearing 
on increases in dog licenses 
and boarding fees. Kate Lit- 
vack reported on an initial 
conversation with repre- 
sentatives of Princeton 
Medical Center on ways in 
which the hospital might 
cooperate in the hiring of paid 
personnel for the First Aid and 
Rescue Squad. 

DINNER PLANNED 

By Hopewell Legion. The 

Hopewell Valley American 
Legion and Unit 339 will hold 
its annual family style Roast 
Beef Dinner from 1 to 6. 

Tickets are available from 
any member and will be sold 
at the door the day of the 
dinner. Adults $5, senior 
citizens $4.50 and children, 
$2.50. 

William McCreedy is 
chairman. The dinner is held 
to raise funds to help support 
the activities the Legion 
sponsors. These include a 
scholarship program. 

TOWNSHIP IS SUED 
Over Slope Ordinance. 
Developer W. Bryce Thom- 
pson IV is suing the Township 
over its new slope ordinance. 
Plaintiffs are actually Mr. 
Thompson's Nassau Builders, 



Inc., and Princeton Research 
Lands, Inc., both of which are 
now before the Planning 
Board for subdivision ap- 
proval. 

The ordinance prohibits 
construction on non- 
residential lots where there is 
a 15 percent slope, and on 
residential lots where the 
slope is 25 percent. The suit 
charges that, in passing the 
ordinance, the Township 
exceeded its powers in con- 
trolling the use of land, under 
the constitution and under 
New Jersey's land-use law. 

It deprives property-owners 
of the reasonable use of their 
land, the suit says, and in 
setting up a difference bet- 
ween residential and non- 
residential properties, is 
discriminatory. 

Nassau Builders' presen- 
tation last week ran up against 
the board's 11:30 p.m. curfew, 
and will be continued next 
Monday at 8 p.m. in Valley 
Road. Nassau Builders wants 
to subdivide 53 acres on 
Herrontown Road into eight 
lots. The property is zoned 
Office-Research. 

The Planning Board must 
eventually decide Mr. 
Thompson's cases knowing 
that the ordinance on which 
part of the decision will be 
based, is under challenge in 
the courts. There is no point in 
waiting to see what happens in 
court, because the board must 
act on applications within a 
certain time after they have 
been filed, or they are 
automatically approved. 
Because of the complexity of 
Mr. Thompson's subdivisions, 
the board has obtained from 
him an agreement to extend 
the time period. 

Restrictions Cited. Last 
week, Richard Wizeman, Mr. 
Thompson's consultant, told 
the board that three of Nassau 
Builders' eight lots were 
constrained by the slope 
requirements. Assuming a 
five-story building, the lots 
could only be built on a floor- 
area ratio of 7.7, 14.6 and 11.5 
percent respectively. Without 
the slope requirements, he 
said, the ratio could be 25 to 27 
percent. The zone allows 45 
percent, but Mr. Thompson 
has suggested that eight 
percent is the average for 
commercial properties 
already built on, and he has 
based his figures for the 
Planning Board on eight 
percent. 

Wendy Benchley, board 
member, said her calculations 
showed that, even when all 
setbacks were observed, one 
of the lots could be 95 percent 
covered, if a one-story 
building were constructed. 

She also protested, after Mr. 
Wizeman's detailed and 
technical presentation, that 
neither the board nor 
Township Engineer Bhagwan 
Dass had had a chance to 
study the material in advance, 
and she asked that the hearing 
be closed . 

Thomas Jamieson, Mr. 



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- Thompson's attorney, replied 
2 that his client was responding 
s to questions of floor-area 
a ratio, traffic, and slope- 
2 ordinance impact, which were 
« raised for the first time 
"-September 24 

< 

g Henry J Ney. traffic 
2 engineer retained by Mr. 
g Thompson, said an eight 
$ percent ratio would produce 
1 615 automobile trips, while a 
z ratio as high as 24 percent 
z would produce 2.000. These 
° were morning rush-hour 
Jj figures, he said, and would be 
z 10 to 12 percent higher in the 
g evening 

„■ If properties were built to a 
u 24 percent ratio, he said, the 
o Herrontown-Route 206 in- 
*~ tersection would have to be 
| widened with the need for left- 
o turn lane, side lanes and 
"" signals, and Route 206 would 

be pressed to its capacity 

level. 

TO BUILD HOUSES 
On Land Triangle. Plans to 
create three half-acre lots for 
construction of solar homes on 
the triangle of land bounded 
by Route 206, the Mountain 
Avenue extension and the cut- 
off portion of lower Bayard 
Lane, were approved, with 
conditions, by the Planning 
Board last week 

Architect Elizabeth 
Moynahan must show the 
board that the Princeton fire 
chief believes the four-inch 
water main now in existence, 
is big enough. The chief, in 
turn, must satisfy himself that 
the Elizabethtown Water Co. 
has facts to back up its 
assertion that four inches is 
satisfactory. 



"1 



Ram and sun 
Come down together 
That's what autumn 
Means by "weather " 



Ram has dotted the land- 
scape almost every 24 hours 
(or the past three weeks, until 
Mother Earth squooshes like a 
wet wash rag 

Wednesday will bring clearer 
but considerably cooler 
weather, the Man said, con- 
sulting his forecast dubiously 
as he recalled all the predic- 
tions that have gone awry ot 
late A milder turn Is due 
Thursday, and once again, 
nothing but partially sunny 
skies are on the weekend 
schedule Didn't work last 
Sunday, though, did it? 



Ms. Moynahan will plant a 
200-foot -long evergreen and 
deciduous buffer to shield the 
houses from Route 206 noise 
and lights. They will not be tall 
trees, her landscape architect 
explained, because they 
cannot be allowed to keep sun 
off the solar houses. 

Board member Josie Hall 
asked for a hardier kind of 
dogwood than proposed for the 
buffer, citing current dogwood 
problems. Colleague Wendy 
Benchley suggested, however, 
that the professional land- 
sea per was capable of making 
that decision, 

SUES OVER FALL 
From Dormitory Roof. A 

Princeton University senior, 
injured when he fell from a 
dormitory roof two years ago, 
has filed suit against the 
University, charging 



tap 3 




*• «*tcom« F WO. ChQ. . VISA, M»«t»r Chg.. Arr 
AJt ftL 1 and T«« Av*. Uwr*nc*vMle 



negligence in the maintenance 
of dormitory safety. 

The student. Peter M, 
Gaytan, is suing for a sum "in 
excess of $10,000," The suit 
was filed August 8 in U.S. 
District Court. 

The accident occurred 
December 16, 1977. Mr. 
Gaytan was hospitalized until 
June, 1978, was in therapy for 
seven or eight months after 
that, and has returned to the 
University this fall for the first 
time since the accident. 

He sustained a fractured 
skull, fractures of two lower 
vertebrae, concussion and 
spinal cord damage. He 
cannot walk without crutches. 

The accident occurred at 
3:05 am, Mr. Gaytan and 
another student who were 
attending a party in Patton 
Hall, a University dormitory, 
climbed through a window 
onto the roof. Students at- 
tending the party say that Mr. 
Gaytan fell 20 feet from the 
edge of the roof. 

In his suit, Mr. Gaytan 
charges that Princeton 
University "failed to provide 
proper and reasonable 
safeguards for safety, or give 
notice or warning of 
dangerous conditions" in the 
dormitory. The suit also states 
that the University "should 
have known" that students 
congregate on the roof and 
balcony of Patton Hall. 

Commenting on Mr. 
Gaytan's action, the 
University's general manager 
of planning, plant and 
properties, Eugene J. 
McPartland, said University 
policy has always forbidden 
entrance to roofs and 
balconies, and he denied that 
the University had been 
deficient in protecting 
students. 

Last year, when students' 
rooms were assigned, 
students were warned that 
roofs are not part of the 
"authorized space" of a 
dormitory room, Mr. 
McPartland said. Certain 
windows now have warning 
signs and some windows 
leading to roof areas, have 
been secured, he added . 



SALARIES APPROVED 

For School Administration. 
A salary increase from $42,000 
to $44,500 for Superintendent 
Paul Houston was approved 
last week by a 6-2 vote of the 
school board. Robin Wallack 
and Rosalind Frisch voted 
"no," Dietrich Meyerhofer 
was absent. 

The salary package includes 
$350 more in travel expenses 
for Dr Houston's office. His 
original contract did not in- 
clude a specific amount for 
travel, but there has been 
$2,100 in the budget for both 
Dr. Houston and Assistant 
Superintendent Paul Jen- 
nings. The additional amount 
will be added, making $2,450. 
The travel money is under Dr, 
Houston's control but will not 
necessarily be used solely by 
him. 

The new two-year contract 
giving 12 administrators -- 
chiefly principals and 
assistant principals -- a 3.1 
percent increase in pay the 
first year, and 3 percent the 
second, was approved, 6-2, 
Mrs. Wallack and Mrs. Frisch 
voting "no." 



WIDEN 571? 

State Suggests. A proposal 
under which several highway 
projects related to the 92-A by 
pass could procede 
simultaneously will be the 
subject next Wednesday when 
mayors of the area, and staff 
from the State Department of 
Trensportation gather at 7 
p.m. at the Holiday Inn, Route 
One. 

Groundwork for the meeting 
was laid at an informal 
session last Tuesday called by 
Mercer County Freeholder 




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To/iits of lllr TfHCII 

Barbara Sigmund, for Mercer 
mayors and any other mayors 
who wanted to send 
representatives. 

The DOT suggests that 
Route 571 (the Princeton- 
Hightstown Road) be widened 
while environmental studies 
for the 92-A bypass continue, 
and Plainsboro Township's 
own bypass is under con- 
struction Also, if Middlesex 
County and the relevant 
townships agreed, both Dey 
and Shalks roads could also be 
widened. 

The process could be 
completed in three years at a 
cost of $55 million, DOT of- 
ficials say, compared to the 
$80 million estimated cost of 
building the entire length of 
92-A, from Route 206 in 
Montgomery Township, to the 
Turnpike. The state has 
divided the 92-A bypass into 
three segments, and has 
expressed interest only in 
construction of the two ends, 
leaving a gap between Route 
One and Route 130. 

The proposal under 
discussion is designed to take 
care of the empty middle 
segment. 

Russell Mullen, assistant 
commissioner for highways 
for the DOT, told Tuesday's 
meeting the state would also 
be willing to calculate costs 
for a two-lane road through 
Plainsboro in or near, the 
proposed 92-A alignment. 

"I feel very strongly," Mrs. 
Sigmund said after Tuesday's 
meeting, "that it's important 
not to wait - this is one of the 
few roads anywhere, where all 
the parties - so far -- agree." 



Warning to Joggers 
Township Mayor Josie 
Hall has urged joggers to 
run in light colored shirts, 
now that daylight hours are 
getting shorter. 

She gave her "word of 
warning" at the beginning 
of Township Committee 
meeting last week "for 
their own sakes, so we 
don't have to make a 
regulation." Mayor Hall 
said that joggers in dark 
reds and blues were a 
hazard to motorists - and 
to themselves -- at dusk, 
and Chief Frederick Porter 
concurred. 



hastily fled the scene. 

According to police, the 
suspect had apparently en- 
tered the Coin Wash earlier, 
climbed on a washing 
machine and removed a 
ceiling tile from the dropped 
ceiling. After crawling across 
the ceiling, he cut a hole in an 
existing wall to enter the dry 
cleaning portion of the 
establishment next door. 

As he lowered himself into 
the dry cleaning area, he 
broke an electric eye, setting 
off an audible alarm 




scurried back to the ceiling, 
through the hole he had cut 
and was making his way 
across the ceiling of the Coin 
Wash, police continued, when 
he fell through. 

He was described as 6-1 to 6- 
2, 200 pounds with short hair 
He had a moustache and was 
wearing blue jeans and an 
army jacket. 



B B O GO B a aBO HOBB Oe O C 

James R. Pietrinferno 
and Company 

James R. Pietrinferno, President 

Compters Tax Consultation 
and Accounting Services 
For More Than Three Decades 
Nusau Street (24-5145 




TO HONOR CANDIDATES 

Borough Democrats. A 
brunch this Sunday in honor of 
mayoralty candidate Robert 
D. McChesney and Council 
candidates Barbara J. Hill 
and Martin P. Lombardo will 
be held at the home of Ann and 
John McGoldrick, 25 Van- 
deventer, from noon until 3. 

The brunch is sponsored by I 
the Princeton Borough 
Democratic Campaign. 
Richard Macgill. Borough 
Council member, is chairman | 
of the event. 

Ticket information may be I 
obtained from campaign 
treasurer Walter R. Bliss, 921- 
2382. 



MIND IF I DROP IN? 
Burglar Falls from Ceiling. 

Two women doing their 
laundry shortly before 3 
Tuesday morning at the Coin 
Wash, the rear of 259 Nassau 
Street, were startled when a 
man fell through the ceiling 
and landed on a washing 
machine. Although he ap- 
peared to have hurt his back in 
the fall, they told police, he 



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Issued 1/29/79«Effective 1/30/79 
C.T.C.(A)No. 131 
Rule 85 
CAB. No. 248 



wondered how long the 
Township would be willing to 
continue, when agency j 
representation is only 50-50. 



CRAFT BAZAAR PLANNED 
By Windsor Seniors. A large 
variety of handcrafted items 
will be on sale at the craft 
bazaar sponsored by the West 
Windsor Keen Agers Club on 
Saturday, October 13, from 9 
to 4 at the First Presbyterian 
Church of Dutch Neck. Ann 
Blyman is chairman of the 
Keen Agers craft group. 
Large pine cone wreaths 
will be available as well as 
miniature wreaths that may 
be worn as jewelry. Other 
items include draft-stoppers, 

A GATHERING OF DEMOCRATS: At a party Saturday honoring Township Com- novelty toys, stuffed animals, 
mittee candidate William Starr (second from right), Governor Brendan Byrne (far Christmas tree ornaments and 
right) stopped by to extend a greeting. Other guests were Attorney General John l J e , < i. skir | s '_ P u PP et do )) s . 
Degnan (left) and Assemblywoman Barbara McConnell. ho.jmwi 



IRIS 

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Mon.-SaL 9:30-6 



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Topics Classified. 



( mittens, lap robes, dolls 
clothespin bags, clothes 

Topics of the Touil graduate students are Department of Community h f n 8 ers ' dorm socks hats 
r J Township residents. Affairs that there would be nc pla ,™ mats ' feIt wreaths "id 

_c.n„n u ,d.romP„e5 "appreciable" tax shift and w ^ decorat,0 , n « „ J 

MIND MADE UP? One speaker said he had Mr. Smoyer pointed out, as hi . "f nc ^ W1 " , e offered on a 

At This Meeting, Anyhow, questions for several mem- has in the past, that Mr "andmade afghan, with 
When moderator Ted Kopp bers of the Joint Consolidation Cornforth came to the sami se ™™ and th,rd P n ? es Tnere 
banged the gavel shortly after studv Commission and others, conclusion when he served 01 ""' ™f a whlle e'epnant table 
10 Monday night following a a nd declared "I expect my the consolidation committe« and DU »ons, old and new. 
consolidation debate in the answers completely and in that reported three years ago. Homemade cakes and other 
Harrison Street firehouse, he public"; however, on this When opponents said the< § ormet . '' ems . wl11 be on sale 
looked over the audience of occasion he asked only where feared lack of Borougt5 andw , lcne .^. bevera ^ s and 
around 80 people and com- Police headquarters would be representation on the new dessert f wl11 be available at a 
mented, "I don't know that located, governing body, Mrs. Reec H " 11 "" 1 ™ sl throughout the 

there's a single non- William Selden, of the referred to the formula foi y 
committed vote in the Commission, said the new sharing joint agency costs: 
room." governing body would decide; one-third from the Borough S ? MCT "^|° ' 

It did seem to be a audience William H.Walker II, referred and two-thirds from the ,«« ' 
with its mind made up, pro or him to the 45-page sub- Township, and said she 
con. Little was said that is committee report on police; 
new. Although voices on both Arthur Morgan read from the 
sides were very firm at times, report that both police 
there were no shouting headquarters would require 
matches. expansion in five years, and 
that each of the present 

Originally, TOWN TOPICS headquarters has advantages 
has learned, there was to be and disadvantages. The 
one speaker from each side, questioner said he still hadn't 
At the last minute, however, been answered. 

Charles Cornforth of Citizens 

Against Consolidation, asked Bo"" 1 lssue Debated. Mrs. 
Mr. Kopp if two speakers van den B1 'nk warned about 
would be allowed. toe Township's new $438,500 

When Mr. Kopp agreed, the Dond ordinance to remodel 
pro-consolidation groups had Valley Road; Township 
to find a last-minute speaker, committee member Kate 
and Stanley C. Smoyer agreed Litvack, listing joint Borough - 
to speak extemporaneously. Township boards already in 
Ingrid Reed was the other pro- Valley Road said the bonds 
consolidation keynoter, were "contingency", and how 
Nelson van den Blink and John m uch was actually spent 
Bleimeier spoke for the anti- depended on the consolidation 
consolidation group. vote in November. 

Opponents continued to 

For and Against. As before, question the conclusion of the 
proponents spoke of Princeton Commission and the State 

as one community ; opponents 

said Borough and Township Correction 

were different. Proponents In its issue of September 26, 
cited efficiencies and TOWN TOPICS reported that 
elimination of duplication in a the store at the Whole Earth 
merged town, opponents Center, 360 Nassau Street, had 
warned of bigness, bureau- been found to have flies and 
cracy and cost evidence of rodents and 

When a Princeton roaches. In fact, only flies 
University student asked how were present and only in the 
a student should vote — more bakery, and there was at no 



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than 5,000 — Mr. Bleimeier 
said most students live in the 
Borough and can have in- 
fluence only if dealing with a 
separate Borough govern- 
ment. Mrs. Reed said students 



time evidence of rodents and 
roaches anywhere on the 
premises. 

The Whole Earth Center 
store has the highest rating 
("Satisfactory") given to 



who live in Princeton Inn food-handling establishments. 

College, which straddles the TOWN TOPICS greatly 

municipal line, do not know regrets that the health in- 

which municipality to turn to, spector's report was misin- 

and pointed out that most terpreted. 




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Questions and Answers 



it** 



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SMART 
STRAPPY 

and 

STACKED 




"■"* 



1 40 NASSAU ST PRINCETON 



INC. 



on 



Consolidation 



Township rates would be if we continued to 
operate two separate governments. 
Residents of both the Borough and Township 
will thereby gain financially from con- 
solidation." 

Assets and Liabilities - It is correct to 
quote from the Commission's report that 
land and buildings held in title by the 
Borough amount to an estimated $10,929,700 
and those held in title by the Township 
amount to an estimated $8,097,900. 

However, in quoting these figures, it is 
definitely misleading to refer to them out of 
context and omit reference to the statement 
that immediately follows these figures in the 
report, namely: 

"The above figures reflect the relative 
total value of real property to which each 
municipality holds title, but they do not 
indicate the fact that some properties held 
in title by one municipality are actually 
properties to which each municipality has 
contributed. These latter figures are dif- 
ficult to extract from the records and 
present another indication how intimately 
the two municipalities have conducted 
many of their relationships with each other. 

Similarly, it is correct to quote the 
January 1, 1979 figures from the report that 
state the net debt of the Borough to be 
$1,555,488 and of the Township to be 
$2,703,753. 

But it is misleading to omit the equally 
important and valid statement that "these 
sums stand in the approximate ratio 36 to 64, 
Borough to Township. This ratio is so closely 
comparable to the current ratio of the 
ratables, or tax base, of the two 
municipalities of 35 to 65 that the Com- 
mission has concluded that it would 
essentially not be inequitable to the 
residents of the Borough or Township, in the 
event of consolidation, for the consolidate 
municipality to assume the current in- 
debtedness of the two municipalities." 

In its report, the Commission noted that Unanimous Report - The conclusions and 

"the municipal tax rates of the Borough and recommendations presented in the report of 

Township, adjusted and equalized to make the Commission were unanimously adopted 

them comparable, now stand within pennies by its ten members - five elected by the 

of each other." Borough voters and five elected by the 

Projections of future tax rates, both by the Township voters a year ago. These con- 
Commission and by the State Department of elusions were reached only after extensive 
Community Affairs, show tax rates for an and intensive debate over the critical issues 
unconsolidated Borough and Township in of consolidation itself, the form of gover- 
1982 to be within a range of tax differences nment, and the form of representation, 
between 2 cents with the Borough higher The Commission had created six com- 
than the Township, and 10 cents with the mittees to which it appointed a large 
Township higher than the Borough. number of citizens from all areas of the 

As stated in the report, whether the community, these committees were ad- 
Borough rate or the Township rate would be visory to the Commission and included a few 
lower depends on the particular assump- individuals who have subsequently and 
tions made about the future relative growth publicly declared themselves opposed to the 
of the two municipalities. This projected Commission's recommendations. We ap- 
difference in tax rates translates into an preciate the assistance that they provided to 
annual difference of a maximum of $100 on a the Commission and respect their individual 
property assessed at $100,000 following decisions to oppose consolidation. Their 
revaluation with no consolidation. personal decisions should not, however, be 

Such sums are not insignificant, but they presented to imply that the recom- 

represent only a maximum of 4 percent of mendations of the elected Commission were 

the total property taxes of approximately not unanimous. 

$2,700 projected in 1982 for a property Regardlessof whether there will be one or 

assessed at $100,000 two municipal governments after the 

The Commission concluded that there will election on the 6th of November, we believe 

be no appreciable tax shift from one all of us in Princeton will benefit if we 

municipality to the other as a result of recognize that both in name and in fact, this 

consolidation Furthermore, it stated "that is one community 
in the longer term, through economies of 
scale and more efficient use of resources, a 
consolidated municipal tax rate will prove 
lat either the Borough or 



Q. What would consolidation really do to 
my taxes? 

A. As co-chairmen of the Princeton Joint 
Municipal Consolidation Study our 
obligation to clarify findings and statements 
contained in our report that we believe have 
been misread or misinterpreted by in- 
dividuals who have written letters to the 
editor or who have been responsible for the 
contents of flyers distributed to homes in 
selected areas of the Borough 

Finances and Taxes - The Commission 
found that the fiscal impact of consolidation 
upon residents of the present two 
municipalities would not be adverse to 
either of the two, and could likely be 
beneficial to both. 

The first year of consolidation would be in 
1981 when what is now the Borough and 
Township will be on a common assessment 
base for the first time following revaluation. 

In that year, the sharing beween Borough 
and Township of the approximately 85 
percent of the costs that comprise the over- 
all property taxes (county, school, and 
jointly shared municipal expenditures) 
would be the same whether or not there is 
consolidation. In other words, the tax rate 
for these costs would be the same, and there 
would be no appreciable shift in total dollars 
paid in property taxes by owners of com- 
parably assessed properties in the Borough 
and Township with or without consolidation. 

In analyzing the various figures for the 
real estate market during recent years, the 
Commission identified a comparable trend 
in prices of property in the Borough and 
Township. The Commission concluded, 
therefore, that it is misleading to state that 
we will not know the extent of a possible tax 
shift until we are able to compare the results 
of the revaluation currently being conducted 
with the present 1979 equalized valuations. 
What is important is 1981 and beyond, not 
1979. 



to be lower than \ 



MARGARET BROADWATER 

WILLIAM K. SELDEN 

co-chairmen, Princeton Joint Municipal 

Consolidation Study Commission. 



sewer pu Renn Kaminski at 12:40 



■♦.«.' 



MORE SEWER CONTROL? requirements 
Township Weighs It. Those connection are needed 
bubbling manholes that make The state has approved a " m A 1 *" 5 " wh,le ' he M '?Z 
a fetching fountain display on report on infiltration and a a f ls ' ,n « a T ow , £ 
Valley Road every time it inflow, and eng ineers can now I Tl ^ "** ""C 
rains hard are one indication draw up S "°nd '° get , h ' S teenage d ?" g Z 
to Township Committee that engineen„g P designs for rena^r Tl 'T " ^&£SES 
perhaps the state's relaxed or replacement, according to rjlt P"nceton Shopp.ng 
sewer connection ban should Township officials ter 

be tightened up a little. 

In Borough criminal court 
Committee member David TOWNSHIP man n in tv last week . Loo's Keifer, 107 
Blair will report at this W Interfering a? »t Le >S h Avenue, was fined a 
Wednesday's 8 p.m. meeting Towns** municipal co r ,as1 lota ' of $20 ° ° n tw0 COm{S "' 
in Township Hall on recom- week JeffrevlkaA ™ lar «ny and one of possession 
mendations from the Sewer Harrison Si™ .ff j of burglary tools. 
Operating Committee, guilt" o? interlering wZf Stevtsugarman, 127 Brown 
Members of the governing patrol officer and assail Iri Hal1 - Princeton University, 
^tra, y ,„M n r bl ,T S "" k" ery H C e e w:s d se a n. S e a „ U ed a to -s fined $1.0 for shoplifting. 

pipes ra n ,0 b n otn nt B „ r °„ gHn'a Co^oTcem^ """I 7 

Township, those bubbling charae both ?' k " eaC ^ ZZ'JZT^Z «*. iT.£«" 
manholes and the fact that all concurrenUv '° "* S " Ve6 »-""™.p w.S3 2. Stt S; 
overflows occur in the Tkacs i« «n.» a . .. « town topics ior.«.n«n.i«ii«" 
Township may mean tighter int'erf^ed'^^a^a^auTted 6 ^^'°^Z - 




o~tfa-0"i_rut 




To/Mrs of ihp Town 

FOUR YOUTHS CAUGHT 

While Drinking on Campus. 
Four Lawrenceville School 
students, three 16 and one 15, 
face further action by juvenile 
authorities, after they were 
arrested Saturday afternoon 
in the basement of Patton Hall 
where university proctors 
discovered them. 

The youths had allegedly 
been drinking. Police found a 
half-gallon of whiskey and 
some beer. In addition, one 
was in possession of under 25 
grams of marijuana. They 
were later released to a parent 
of one after being charged. 
Ptl. Monica Sheehan and Ptl 
Robert Mucciarelli were the 
arresting officers. 

Peter L. Ward, 20, 118. 
Witherspoon Street, and CAREER AWARDS DRIVE BEGINS: John Baker (right) president ol Career 
Donald L. Rickert, 18, 25 1 Development Awards, accepts the lirst two contributions toward CDA's 
Monroe Road, were arrested scholarship fund from John Hoff (center), President of the First National Bank, and 
at 1:50 Monday morning at Ron Wechsler, President of Cointreau, Inc. of Lawrenceville. CDA awards 
Roy's Arco Station, 272 scholarships every year to graduating high school seniors in Princeton, Lawrence, 
Alexander Street, and Montgomery and West Windsor who are continuing their education in vocational 
charged with the larceny of fields. The scholarships are funded by donations from Princeton area businesses 
gasoline. and industries and the Princeton Youth Fund. 

They are alleged to have si- — 
phoned gasoline from a green 
pickup truck parked at the 
station. Ptl. Anthony Gaylord 
and Ptl. David Wilbur 
discovered a hose leading 
from the gas tank to a five- 
gallon can on the ground. The 
officers also found two empty 
gas cans in the suspects' car 
and reported they smelled of 
fresh gasoline. 

The two were later released, 
pending their appearance in 
municipal court. 

Two Township girls, 15 and 
13, have been charged by 
police with shoplifting five 
Sportsac bags valued at $114 
from Bamberger's in the 
Princeton Shopping Center. 

The two were observed 
taking the bags into a dressing 
room by a store security 
guard and leaving with the 
bags concealed in their 
shoulder bags. They were 
turned over to the juvenile 
officer and later released to 
their parents, pending further 
investigation. 

Jacob H. Nettles, 22, of 
Philadelphia was arrested last 
week by Borough police and 
charged with soliciting 
without a permit on the corner 
of Nassau and Witherspoon 
Streets. 

Nettles was selling leather 
goods, police said, including 
leather wallets, key cases, 
check covers and small 
purses. He is scheduled to 
appear in court this Wed- 
nesday. 

MAN IS CHARGED 

With Aggravated Assault. A 
Browns Mills resident has 
been charged with the 
aggravated assault last week 
of a Laurel Circle woman. 

Richard Robbins, 25, was 
arrested last Wednesday by 
Pemberton Township police, 
who had been supplied with 
the license number of Rob- 
bins's car. He is alleged on the 
same day to have entered the 
Laurel Circle home at 10:54 in 
the morning on the pretext of 
using the telephone. 

Once inside, police said, he 
drew a hunting knife. He 
threatened the victim and fell 
on top of her. Her screams 
alerted her parents, who 
rushed to the scene and 
Robbins ran out of the house. 

Robbins is presently being 
held at the Mercer County 
Detention Center, awaiting 
further action by a Grand 
Jury. Det. Samuel Bianco and 
Ptl James Vandermark in- 
vestigated. 



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He sustained abrasions and 




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Topics of ilir T„un 



2 lacerations o( the eye as a 
c result of the punch and fell to 
a the ground. Police were called 
° at 12:08 p.m. Friday by a 
o passing motorist, who saw the 
- driver (all to the roadway and 
< thought he had been hit by a 
g car 

£j He was punched as he drove 
o past three individuals. "It was 
$ an unprovoked assault." said 



Chief Michael Carnevale. 
From their investigation so 
far. Chief Carnevale reported, 
police have determined the 
suspect is a resident of 
Lawrenceville and attends 
Lawrence High School. 
Borough juvenile officer is 
continuing the investigation. 

THEFT REPORT 

Campus Favorite of 

Thieves. The Princeton 

University campus continues 

to be a favorite hunting 




iThe toMowmg information was researched and writtei 
members of me Regional Schools PTO Council, and the opinions 
expressed are not those of TOWN TOPICS I 

The 1979-1980 school year is live weeks under 
way. and with this column the P T O Council of Ihe 
Princeton Regional Schools resumes ils reporting of 
"highlighls" from among the many events, programs 
and activities taking place daily in our schools Our, 
first news hunt brought forth items from three 
schools In future columns we shall try to include 
some news from each school each week and oc- 
casional contributions from members of the school 
community in addition to a calendar of school-related 
events for the coming weeks. 

The weekly bulletins in the elementary schools and 
the parents' newsletters in the middle and high 
schools will provide more comprehensive coverage 
of a particular school, Ihe aim of Ihis column will be lo 
offer glimpses into Ihe many ways of learning and 
growing which can be found in the Princeton 
schools 

Rosemary McGee, President, P. TO. Council 

At JOHNSON PARK parents and children both are 
finding that back-lo-school time is a time for meeting 
new people, exploring new areas of knowledge and 
learning new skills Mrs. Shteir's first grade and Mrs 
McCartin's k-1 class celebrated Apple Day and the 
coming of fall by visiting Terhune's Orchards and 
then making their own applesauce, a learning ac- 
tiviliy involving Iwo senses of greal importance fo 5, 
and 6 year olds taste and smell Fourth and fifth 
grade classes have been working on more advanced 
science projects - everything from plant study to 
oceanography. 

Class parents at JP have met the slaff at a tea. and 
a Coffee and Conversation scheduled for Oct. 10 will 
give all parents an opportunity to meet with the new 
principal. Norma Gumbiner In the planning stage 
and a maior event of the fall season, is the 2nd In- 
ternational Dinner for parents and stall set for Nov 2 
With all families from the Institute for Advanced 
Study now in the JP district, this occasion will be one 
to welcome newcomers to the community and lo 
enable longer-time residents to meet their interesting 
new neighbors 

At a recent Wednesday afternoon Professional 
Growth Program at COMMUNITY PARK, teachers 
were instructed in the use of the new DICOM In- 
dividual Testing Program in Math The program 
involves tests administered to individual students on 
a microfiche reader to determine mastery of basic 
math skills When a skill deficiency is discovered. Ihe 
teacher can step in immediately to re-teach 'that 
particular skill Children who answer the multiple- 
choice questions correctly, proceed al their own 
pace to more difficult problems. All teachers al CP 
will have access to the new program to assist them in 
identifying specific math deficiencies 

Also at CP the YWCA After School Program for 
children of working parents is using laciltiies each 
afternoon from 2 40-5 About 30 K. 1-2 youngsters 
are benefiting from Ihis cooperation between two 
groups serving the community 

CALENDAR OF EVENTS 
Oct 10: Coffee and Conversation with Ms Gum- 
biner. 8 00 p.m.. Johnson Park School 

Coffee and Conversation with Mr Cohen 8 00 
p m . Community Park School 
Oct 14-20: National School Lunch Week 
Oct 16: PTO Council Meeting. 9 30 am Valley 

Oct. 24: International Dinner. Auction. Community 

NOTE CHANGE: a a Show al high school changed 

'h 17. 



ground for thieves. 

A Princeton resident had 
her leather purse containing 
$8 and credit cards taken 
between 12:30 and 1:30 
Monday while she was visiting 
McCormick Hall. 

On Sunday, a thief pried 
open a door of a room in 
Walker Hall and took $50 from 
a dresser drawer, and a 
student told police that his 
wallet was stolen between 9 
and 11 Sunday night from a 
Dillon Gym locker 

An unlocked room in Brown 
Hall yielded a 35 mm camera 
valued at $350 and a second 
occupant lost $40 from a desk 
drawer. A set of golf clubs 
valued at $400 was taken from 
the trunk of a student's car 



while it was parked early 
Sunday morning in the 
Princeton U-Store lot Police 
said the trunk had been forced 
open 

A locked bicycle valued at 
$100 was stolen from the Elm 
Club and three cars parked in 
the Ivy Club lot had their gas 
tanks siphoned. 

There were two victims 
after a thief entered an 
unlocked room in Pyne Hall 
One occupant lost $15 from her 
wallet, $20 from a jewelry box 
and a $20 gold chain; her 
roommate had $5 taken from 
her wallet 

A $200 leather jacket was 
taken early Saturday morning 
from a car parked on North 



Michael's Unisex Harcutters 

No Appointment Necessary 

HRS: Tuw. 9-5 Wed.-Frl. 9-9 Sat. 8-4 Sun. 9-2 
Kingston Shopping Canter 




B.M. Rider 

Antique and Fine Furniture 

Restored & Refinished 

Reglueing& Repairing 

Hand Stripping 

Caning • Rushing 

JUarof 75 Main St. {Rt. 27) • Klngii, 

924-0147 

PICK UP AND DELIVERY SERVICE 



CANDIDATES 

FOR PRINCETON BOROUGH 



Speak Out on 
Community Development 




Republican Borough Candidates, (I to r) Mayor Bob Cawley, Councilman Dick Wood- 
bridge, and Council Candidate Gary Grover, study the model of Princeton's Central 
Business District. 



Reelect 
CAWLEY 



hnn 



Mi goal Is to 
residential 
enrich down 
point of the 
Improve Its 
achievement! 



in Ihis 



My 



Include: 

Downtown 

• Downtown Plan Town 
Meetings 1971 • CBO Master 
Plan 1974 • Chambers Walk 
1977 • Improved Parking - 
more spaces and Pork and 
Shop • Art People Parties • 
Downtown Development 
Planning 1978 & 1979 
Housing 

• Secondary Residence (Flat) 
Ordinance 1978 ' Planning 
Board Review PCH and 
■YEDLIN" Housing Projects • 
Working for Borough PCH 
Project. 



Elect 
GROVER 

In the Central Business 
District f would like to see 
moderate expansion in the 
variety of quality stores, 
evening hours of operation, 
hotel accommodations, the 
library, housing, and parking. 
Regarding the latter- since I 
despise acres of asphalt. I 
favor developing a single self- 
sufficient garage for about 300 

All new development in 
Princeton should enhance the 
environment, provide open 
public space, and be energy 
efficient. This last point is 
critical for today s u>orld since 
our greatest source of energy 
Is conservation. Additionally, 
it is only fitting that a town of 
Princeton's quality not build 
dinosaurs. We are a great town 
whose best days are yet to 



Reelect 
WOODBRIDGE 

TTie twenty-first century Is 
only two decades away. During 
the past year I've sat as an 
alternate Council delegate to 
the Downtown CBD Com- 
mittee. I've tried to make sure 
that the ultimate solutions 
comply with the needs of the 
various groups within the 
community. 

It is now clear to me that 
Princeton is beginning to feet 
the effects of the year 2000 In 
terms of traffic, interest In 
improved emergency medical 
services, and Increased 
pressures on everyday life. We 
can't Ignore problems and 
hope they go away. Good 
planning now means a better 
Princeton for us and our 
families tomorrow. 



BOB CAWLEY FOR MAYOR 
GARY GROVER FOR COUNCIL 
DICK WOODBRIDGE FOR COUNCIL 
HELEN BESS FOR TAX COLLECTOR 



Sponsorship of 'Boat People' Family 
From Vietnam Is Voted by YWCA Board 



The plight of the Viet- 
namese boat people and what 
can be done to help them will 
be the topic of a meeting on 
Monday at 8 at the YWCA on 
Paul Robeson Place. 

A desire to help the boat 
people has been voiced by 
many YWCA members, and at 
its last meeting, the Board of 
Directors voted to sponsor a 
Vietnamese refugee family 
immigrating to this country. A 
steering committee was 
established to make the 
necessary arrangements. 

In calling next Monday's 
informal meeting, Pam 
Mount, committee chairman, 
has urged anyone who is 
concerned and wants to learn 
about the boat people or would 



like to help with this relocation 
project to come. Doris 
Jankowicz, refugee consultant 
for the N.J. Lutheran 
Immigration and Refugee 
Service will speak, and 
Princeton residents who 
helped resettle refugees here 
four years ago after the 
Vietnamese War will be on 
hand to answer questions. 

The committee needs 
assistance in raising money, 
locating housing, finding 
tremporary employment and 
collecting furniture, clothing 
and cooking equipment. 
Anyone who would like to help 
but cannot come to the 
meeting should call Mrs. 
Mount at 924-2310 or the 
YWCA at 924-1825, ext. 2. 



Hot Tubs • Saunas 

Jaccuzzi • Whirlpools 

PRINCETON 

POOL TABLES 

(609)466-1717 



^ SAT 103 

OUTGROWN SHOP. 



Jewels 
by Juliana 

1 6 Witherspoon St. 
921-7233 



THE CLOTHES LINE 
On The Square 

Lovely Apparel for 

infants & children 

924-2078 



Topics of the Town 

Tulane Street. Although the 
car was locked, police report 
no signs of forced entry. The 
victim is a Trenton resident. 

A Princeton resident lost a 
briefcase valued at $100 and a 
$150 tape recorder when his 
unlocked car was entered on 
Friday. It was parked on 
Chambers street. 

A girl's 10-speed bicycle was 
taken last week in front of the 
Alchemist & Barrister 
Restaurant on Witherspoon 
Street. It was unlocked and 
valued at $130. 



CAR OVERTURNS 
On Mountain Avenue. 

Michael P. Nosal, 21 Morgan 
Place, was charged with 
failing to keep right, after his 
car overturned early Friday 
morning on Mountain Avenue 
between Morgan Place and 
Pardoe Road. 

According to the police 
investigation by Ptl. Anthony 
Gaylord, the Nosal car had 
turned from Pardoe onto 
Mountain Avenue and ran off 
the roadway, traveling 150 
feet before overturning. Mr. 
Nosal told the office that some 
deer had run across the 
roadway in front of his car and 
he turned to avoid them. He 
was treated at Princeton 
Medical Center for lacerations 
of the face. 

Youths Flee Accident. 

Borough police received a call 



at 2 : 15 Sunday morning that a 
car had just struck a tree on 
Moore Street near Hawthorne 
and that the occupants were 
running from the car. 

The police investigation led 
them to a 16-year old youth 
who, they learned, was 
operating the car without the 
consent of his parents. Their 
investigation also revealed 
that the car had driven across 
the front lawn of Princeton 
High school. 

The driver sustained minor 
bruises and abrasions but the 
car was extensively damaged, 
police said. Borough juvenile 
officer Douglas Watson is 
continuing the investigation. 



SILVERWARE STOLEN 

Valued at $5434. 

Approximately 30 pieces of 
sterling silverware, valued at 
$5434.50, have been stolen 
from a Province Line Road 
home. 

Entry was gained by 
breaking out the glass in a 
kitchen door on the side of the 
house and unlocking two locks 
on the door. Police, who 
received a report of the entry 
early last week, said that 
various other items were 
handled on the first floor but 
nothing was disturbed on the 
second. Det. Frank Boc- 
canfuso and Ptl. James 
Vandermark investigated. 

In the Borough, two stereo 
speakers and a turntable were 
reported stolen last week from 
a Westcott Road home. There 
were no signs of forced entry, 
police said. 




PREVENT FIRES! That's the message from this 
quartet of Littlebrook School students, who marked 
Fire Prevention Week with an inspection tour of a 
piece of Princeton fire department equipment. In the 
cab are, Michael O'Neill (left) and Juliette Finzi. In 
conference with Foreman Raymond Wadsworth of 
Mercer Engine Company No. 3 are Lamar Gibson and 
Hilda Tucubal. Other members of the fire company 
who guided Monday's tour of the truck for Littlebrook 
students were Clinton Groover, Kenneth Rendall, 
Kevin McClo skey and Robert Bruschi. 



ONE PRINCETON 



ONE GOVERNMENT 



Many Neighborhoods, Working, Planning, Growing Together 

IT MAKES SENSE! 



Clara & Nathaniel Abbol 

Fay & Herberi Abelson 

Charles S JoAnna Agle 

Blan & Kalherme Aldridge 

Mildred & William Alston 

Eleanor & William Angolt 

James A Arnold 

Myrna & Peter Bearse 

Martin S Ruin Beck 

Ruin Belford 

Wendy Benchley 

Fran Benson 

Gerald & Sheila Berkelhammer 

Henry & Louise Bessire 

Elaine S Roberi Bezilla 

Manone Blaxiii 

Junius Jay & Yvonne Bleiman 

Mary S Walter Bliss 

Alden & Louise Blodget 

Laura & Wilbert Brooks 

Aureha & Lankford Boiling 

Geraldme & Rowan Boone 

Elizabeth & Raymond Bowers 

David S Judith Brodsky 

Alice Bf own 

Harriets Kirk Bryan 

Caroline & Howard Russell Butler 

Elizabeth-Ann & Norman Callaway 

Floyd & Consuelo Campbell 

James G & Jane Campbell 

Ken & Pat Chase 

Phyllis S Richard Cassel 

Adele & Thomas Cawley 

Dean S SueChace 

Elizabeth & Lesler Chandler 

Marvin Cheilen 

Ruth Cherniss 

Patricia & William Cherry 

Florence S Paul Chesebro 

Ellen Clarke 

Ansley & Sarah Coale 

George D Cody 

Andrew W & Mary Conrad 

Mildred & Thomas Cook 

Peggy & Richard Cross 

John & Mane Dibianco 

Annie & Robert Dicke 

Elizabelh & Richardson Dilworih 

Angelo & Nancy Di Meglio 

Carol Luttman Dinsmore 

JaneDix 

Meryl Dobnn 

George & Sarah Easier 

Evangeline Eckfeld 

Braxion& Evelyn Ellerbe 

Barbara & Brooks Emeny 

Jess & Marion Epstein 

Ann L. Erdman 

Lois Etz 

Donald L Evans 

Helen Fairbanks 

AdraS Kenneth Fairman 

Leona Medvm Farber 

Howard & Maxme Farmer 

Arthur & Harriet Fein 

Betly Fenton 

Jeremiah & Nancy Finch 

Elizabelh & John Fine 

Fannie & James Floyd 

Agnes & William Forsyth 

Frederic E Fox 

Helena Fraker 

Margarei & Norman Fredenksen 

Archie S Dorothy Freeman 

George & Sue Fremon 

Mary S Samuel Froihmgham 

Walter F Fullam 

Joan & John Gahardo 

ArleneL Gardner 

Everelt Garretson 

Helen Geary 

Evelyn & Robert Geddes 

Jean & Robert Gilpm 

Charlotte & Leon Gipson 

Frieda Gilvarg 



Ann & Waller Gips 

Laura s Stephen Goldteld 

Golda&Melvin Gottlieb 

Sam & Trudy Glucksberg 

Gen & Robert Gorman 

Richard Gregg 

Pamela Grossman 

Dorothy & Harold Gulhksen 

Margarei & Thomas Haber 

John S Josephine Hammer 

Mariha & Thomas Hartmann 

Kalherme Heidere 

Carol & James Herring 

AC Reeves & Joan Hicks 

Robert & Susan Hither 

Lincoln & Sarah Hollister 

Carol S Herberi Horowlle 

AS & Vera House 

Vonnie Hueston 

RomonaHutl 

Winifred Humphrey 

Charles & Geraldine Hurtord 

Elizabelh Hutler 

Edward & Myrna Jenkins 

Alice &R Park Johnson 

Barbara & Tristam Johnson 

Judy & Walton Johnson 

Landon & Sarah Jones 

Maitiand S Susan Jones 

Penny & Sheldon Judson 

Elizabelh Kassler 

Hannah Kahn 

Lydia & Nicholas Katzenbach 

NoraS Kim 

Anne & David Klein 

Elizabeth Knapp 

Edward Kopp 

Mariha Lamar 

Frederick S Zelda Laschever 

JohnS Katharine Lasiey 

Lucy Lennon 

Dons & Richard Lester 

Roberl& Virginia Levme 

HeathS Jean i icklldei 

Nancy & William Lilland 

Lore& Peler Lmdenfeld 

Arlhur & Margaret Link 

Kate i itvack 

David S Rita Ludlum 

Gordon S Kay Mack 

Lucy MacKenzie 

Billy S Bod Marlin 

William McCleery 

Edith S Henry Martin 

Jean McDonough 

JohnMcGoldnck 

Martin S Rita McGumn 

Peggy S T J McNeill 

Howard S Lucy Menand 

Annetle & Fowler Merle-Smiih 

Nelle & Rutus Miles 

Bermce Miller 

Abbol Low S Marion Modal 

John & Julie Moran 

Amy & Ken Morgan 

Arthur S Mildred Morgan 

Elizabeths Perry Morgan 

Louise Morse 

Mary Morse 

Caroline & Roger Moseley 

John S Mary Murnn 

Bonnie Nalhan 

Joan S Niels Nielsen 

Rose Nini 

Daphne S Frank Notestem 

Anne S Joseph O'Neill 

Emily S William Parker 

David S Sybil Parnes 

Penelope Pennmgroth 

WinihropPike 

Lydia Poe 

Alan & Anne Poole 

David S Kalhanne Popenoe 

Arnold S Phyllis Popkin 

Rhona Por ler 



Dorothy & James Powers 
Dana S Henry Powsner 
Carmen Prezioso 
Alberi S Terry Price 
Cans Elizabelh Price 
Anne S John Rassweiler 
Barbara S David Redlield 
Ingrid S Marvin Reed 
Albert S Marianne Rees 
Anne S David Reeves 
DenyseReid 
William H Reinheimer 
Joseph S Lynn Ringland 
Arlhur Rittmaster 
RayE Robinson 
Jerome & Naomi Rose 
Arnold Roth 

Harvey S Nancv Rothberg 
Bill S Priscilla Russel 
Belly Russinolf 
Charles & Christine Si John 
Dom S Pam Santavicca 

Mrllv :,.i|iMrh 

Harry & Isabelle Sayen 
James C Sayen 
William H Scheide 
Chrystal Schivell 
Marlin B Schneiderman 
Carl S Elizabeth Schorske 
BetlieS William Schrader 
Elaine Schuman 
Virginias William Selden 
Alison S Fadlou Shehadi 
AnneB Shepherd 
William H Short 
Peggy Siebens 
PaulSigmund 
Mariha S William Sloane 
Robin Smith 

Barbara & Stanley Smoyer 
Jean S Robert Smyth 
Elaine S Roberi Solomon 
Margot S Thomas Southerland 
Harold S Margarei Sprout 
James S Marilyn Steeg 
Carol Steinberg 
Walker W Stevenson, Jr 
HazelS Thomas Slix 
Martha Stohlman 
Sally Strachan 
Chester S Kay Stroup 
Pair icia Sullivan 
Sally S William Sword 
Christopher S Susan Tarr 
EdwardS Virginia Taylor 
Gladys Taylor 
Doris Tazelaar 
Catherine Barlon Thomas 
Claire S Harry Tobey 
Louise Tomkins 
Charles & LelilraUfford 
Richard H Ullman 
Marcia S Nicholas Van Dyck 
J Koerl S Nancy Vander Voort 
Deborah S James Vink 
Harry Volwieder 
Arlhur S Bonnie Wagner 
JeameS W.ll.am Walker 
John D S Marjone Wallace 
John H S Margarei Wallace 
Priscilla Wanng 
Susan Waxwood 
Raymond & Rita Weihaus 
KennethS Jean Wells 
Charles S Leslie WesioM 
Helmut Weymar 
Milton S Nancy White 
Sarah B Wilhelm 
Charles S Nancy Willard 
AlanS Beverly Williams 
Edna S Sydney Wilhs 
Mary Wisnovsky 
JackS Mary Worthmglon 
Benjamin & Lieske Wnghi 
Annis S Charles Young 



VOTE YES FOR CONSOLIDATION 
ON NOV. 6th 

Paid (or by Borough Action Group: Charles SL John, Treasurer. 263 Prospect Avenue 

Township Citizens lor Consolidation: Chris Terr. Treasurer, 21 3 State Road ___ 



The Hope Chest 



\/Ut/ut*'i. 

Wallcoverings 
Always Discounted 
.1 883-2056 



Topic* <>f the Town 



The Multimodal Therapy Institute 

2* Main SlrMI, Klngaton 

inwa 
A SERIES OF OPEN WORKSHOPS 

October's Topic - "Coping with Children" 

Saturday, October 13, 20, 27 --2-4 pm 

Led by Dr. Howard Rappaport 

Public Imlted Raaarvallona Accepted 

AdmlulontS; »7 SOcoupIt (80S! 924-8010 



£ Wines Spirits Wines Spirits Wines Spirits § 




anD 

tftpiuie 



A CALIFORNIA WINE 

WITH A TASTE 

OF FRENCH BURGUNDY 

24 oz. Franciscan Burgundy 
"Cask 318" $3.46 

{tax included - 1 0% less by case) 

THE CELLAR 

PRINCETON'S WINE SHOP 

1 74 Nassau SI (Next to Davidsons) Prince! 

For Fast Free Delivery 

Telephone 924-0279 

Manager Ed Clohossey 

Hours Mon -Thurs 9-9. Fn and Sat 9-10 



Wine s Spirits Wines Spirits Wines Spirits 



TWIN GIRLS BORN 

Al Medical Center. Mr and 
Mrs Stuart Remz of 8 Rich- 
ford Road, Kendall Park, 
became the parents of twin 
daughters born September 27 
in the Medical Center at 
Princeton. The twins were 
among 16 girls and 12 boys 
bom during the week ending 
September 28. 

Daughters were also born to 
Mr and Mrs Neil Schuster, 79 
Rockybrook Road, Cranbury, 
September 23; Mr. and Mrs. 
Robert Young, 18 Stratton 
Drive, Hamilton Square; Mr. 
and Mrs. Norman Friedman, 
Townhouse Garden Apart- 
ments, Building A, Hight- 
stown; Mr. and Mrs. John 
Flagg, RD 1, Box 317, 
Jamesburg; Mr. and Mrs. 
John Muldoon, 11 Ridgeview 
Road, Jamesburg, all on 
September 24; 

Also to Mr. and Mrs. Chris 
Frazzetta, 13 Greenbrier 
Row; Mr. and Mrs. Robert 
Rich, 5 Laurel Wood Drive, 
Lawrenceville; Mr. and Mrs. 
John Terebey, 25 Kory Drive, 
kendall Park; Mr. and Mrs. 
D.E. Fraczkiewicz, 357 
Fieldston Court North, 
Yardley, Pa., all on Sep- 
tember 25; Mr. and Mrs. 
Harvey Bernstein, 317 Bolton 
Road, Hightstown; Mr. and 
Mrs. Kenneth Hitchner, 450 
South Main Street, Hight- 
stown; Mr. and Mrs. Martin 
Semmellack, 236 Cherry Hill 
Road; Mr and Mrs. Mark 
Halverson, 30 Fox Chase Run, 
Belle Mead, all on September 
26; Mr. and Mrs. Michael 
Hantson, 26-16 Fox Run Drive, 
Plainsboro, September 27. 

Sons were born to Mr. and 
Mrs. Gerard Thornton, 19 
Dunbar Drive, RD 4, Rob- 
binsville; Mr. and Mrs. Smith 
Freeman, Cleveland Circle, 
Skillman; Mr. and Mrs. 
Wesley Townsend, 152 Guyot 
Avenue, all on September 22; 
Mr. and Mrs. Keith Larini, RD 
1, Box 66b, Mountain Road. 
Neshanic; Mr. and Mrs. E. 
Bloxom Baker, 1 Birch Street, 
Pennington; Mr. and Mrs 
Robert Kulina, 9 Brooktree 
Road, East Windsor; Mr. and 



Mrs. John Shedd, 301 Emmons 
Drive, West Windsor, all on 
September 24; 

Also to Mr. and Mrs 
William Reedy, 11 Arlene 
Court, Belle Mead, September 
26; Mr. and Mrs. Richard 
Hirstein, 157 Hollow Road, 
Skillman; Mr. and Mrs. 
Lawrence Solomon, 15 Timber 
Road, East Brunswick, both 
on September 27; Mr. and 
Mrs. John Fleming 39 
University Place ; and Mr and 
Mrs William Warger, 29 10th 
Avenue, Spotswood, both on 
September 28. 

A daughter, Kate Fleming 
Levin, was born September 7 
in New York City to Dr Molly 



Hall Levin and her husband 
Charles Levin Dr Levin is the 
daughter of Georgine Hall 
Freedman of Wheatsheaf 
Lane. 

BATHTUBS DAMAGED 
At Construction Sites. 

Vandals last week damaged 
bathtubs waiting to be in- 
stalled in new homes under 
construction in the Wendover- 
Brookstone Drive area. 

A plumbing contractor told 
police that a bathtub still in its 
packing crate had been 
dropped from the main floor to 
the concrete basement below, 
causing it to break. A second 
tub was dropped 12 feet from 
the main floor to the ground 
outside, which slopes away 



abruptly from the house It 
was not damaged. 

In another instance, a six- 
foot porcelain bathtub was 
pushed from an opening in the 
second floor to the ground 
outside at a home on Wen- 
dover Drive, damaging the 
tub which is valued at $600 

Borough police report that 
two tires of the car of a 
Stanworth Drive resident 
were slashed last week while 
it was parked outside the 
apartment. 




CONS 



TION 



IT MAKES SENSE" 

UNTIL YOU THINK 
ABOUT IT! 

ITALWA YS COSTS MORE THAN 
FIRST ESTIMATED— 

MURPHY'S LAW # 7 



. — I Citizens 

L2LI Against Consoi.ii)/ 



LET'S USE WHAT WE HAVE WISELY 



VOTE DEMOCRATIC 

ON 

NOVEMBER 6 




McCHESNEY FOR 

MAYOR 

HILL AND LOMBARDO 

FOR COUNCIL 



PARKING - A THREE-POINT PLAN 

NO CAPITAL EXPENDITURE N0 EXPENSIVE CONSULTANTS 

1 . Add Good Long-Term Spaces by Eliminating 2-Hour Restriction on Streets Adjacent to 
CBD. 

2. Enforce Meter-Feeding Ordinance-Increase Spaces for Shoppers. 

3. Re-Design Half the Existing Parking Spaces for Compact Cars. 

ROBERT McCHESNEY FOR MAYOR 





Frozen 

Sara Lee 
Pound Cake 



XO'A 02, 
pkg. 



99 



Frozen 16 02. $11 9 

Tree Tavern Pizza pkg. I 

Frozen Ore-ldo 20ca.CAt 

Shoestring Potatoes P k Ot 
Seneca Apple Juice tan 39* 

Froten Green Peas or Peas & Carrots 24 OZ A AC 

Vegetables Foodtown bag Ott 

Froien In Buffer Sauce. Cream Com. Sweet Medium Peas or 
Whole Kernel Nlbfcts Com 1 02. C A C 

Vegetables Gr««n Olant pkg. 37 
Frozen Corn on the Cob a i n aac 

Blrdseye Little Ears pkg 99 

Frozen Cut or French Style lO 02 J Ac 

Green Beans Blrdseye pkg **Y 

Frozen Morton ^Ooz^cc 

Macaroni & Cheese pkg /O 

Frozen 14 z <i5« 

Gortons Fish & Chips P t g 1 

Frozen o 02 $129 

Gortons Shrimp Sticks pkg I 
DAIRY SAVINGS 



Fr«lh 

Tropicana 
Orange Juice 

r $ 1 09 

Yi gal. 

carton PJ 



$179 



Light n' Lively 

Cottage Cheese 

Colored or White Sliced 

Kraft American Singles pkg 

Assorted Flavors h <-,; a ac 

Breyers Yogurt cupOV 

Whole or Part Skim 15oz.$109 

Foodtown Ricotta cup I 

Whole Milk toznnt 

Foodtown Mozzarella pkg tt 

Foodtown Cheese IO0Z.S139 

Sharp Cheddar Stix pkg I 

Regular Quarters lb X AC 

Margarine Land O' Lakes pkg OY 

Assorted Variene* wm> Yogurt Zoujner 12 0Z.QEC 

Cottage Cheese cup ©9 

Natural SOced 8 02. $129 

Kraft Swiss Cheese pkg I 

Save More I6 0LCA 

Plain King Sour cup 9 



Detergent 
$139 



49 02 

box 



Refreshing 

Motfs 
Apple Juice 

iC 



40 OZ. 

btl. 



79 



Refreshing 

Tetley 
Tea Bags 

$159 



IOO in 
box 



for Your laundry 

Cold Power 
Detergent 

. s l 19 

49 02. 

box 



Save More 

Welchade 
Grape Drink 



49« 



Italian Style Peeled 

Montini 
Tomatoes 



59* 



Whole Kernel Golden 

Green Giant 
Niblets Corn 



%# cans I 



Save More 

Sacramento Uot 
Tomato Juice can 



69< 



Save More 

Hunt's 
Tomato Sauce 



6- $ l 

^0 cans ■ 



Save More 

Progresso 
Olive Oil 



$049 



Chunk White 

Chicken ml Sea, 
Tuna Fish 



79< 



Kidney S Beans 2 ?an'' 



49< 



Lentil Mushroom 01 Mac & Bean ]0</, 02 A AC 

Progresso Soup can 4» 

Natural 20 oz. e AC 

Motfs Apple Sauce m Dtt 

Save More 32'wttc 

Motfs Clamato mi #9 

Bonus Package 12 in m At 

S.O.S Soap Pads tx» 4V 

*2 Z)rl, ■ IO Vermicelli or *\7 Ungurne |p m A( 

Ronzonl Pasta oox4y 



Assorted Varieties Ronzonl 

Spaghetti Sauce 

Dog Food 

Alpo Beef Chunks 

Laundry 64oz.$A 

All Liquid Detergent wi. •£ 

Round In Puree 26 oz E A 

Montini Tomatoes can Dt 

32 bN 0i 69 



^59° 

Iu/. 01 $1 
cans I 

49 



PRODUCE SAVINGS 



Green 

Fresh 
Broccoli 



large 
bunch 



79 



Vine Ripened Large 

Sweet 
Honeydew 



$139 



US * I Extra Fancy Washington State 

Red or Golden 
Delicious Apples , 



59< 



Fresh Crisp 

California 
Green Peppers 



49« 



Fresh 

California 
Carrots 



,39< 



Fresh Crisp 

Pascal Celery 

Fresh Local 

Green Cabbage 

Sweel 

GoldenYams 

Florida 

Avocado 

Refreshing (Size 235) 

Zesty Lemons 

Fresh Local 
DeliciousApples 



s.a,k49« 

,bl9* 
,b29* 

each iw 

O lor 59 

3 lb Ant 
bagOTr 



APPETIZER SAVINGS 



DELI SAVINGS 



BAKERY SAVINGS 



Freshly Sliced to Order 

Schickhaus Bologna 
or Liverwurst 



>4 lb 



79 



Selft Premium 

Sliced Bacon 




99 



rvwuivwir 

English Muffins 



0,o t $l 



Chicken Breast 



Freshly Sliced to Order Spiced OAC 

Luncheon Loaf Haydu '/iibOY 

Freshly Sliced to Order A/C 



Sliced Genoa or 

Hormel Hard Salami 

Hormel 

Pepperoni Stick 



s r 



Foodtown Pumpernickel orjj, 14 oi AAC Hormel 

Jewish Rye Bread Z loaves W Pepperoni Stick 

10O% Whole or Cracked I601 jifte Freshly Sliced to Order Hormel 

Wheat Bread Foodtown toot 4Y Leon! Pepperoni 



Freshly Sliced to Order A/C QCC 

Genoa Salami earanao Y* it> 09 

Freshly Sliced to Order "TO c 

ECCO Hot Ham Carando Vt lb / ▼ 

3 3 ' 
79* 

ity Delicious XCC 

live Salad « OO 

9d to Order S40S 

Cheshire Che*** ib o 

,_. unked Imported SI 39 

O O DUNCAN NINES O »< °nProvolone Kb 1 

c c c-CAKE 

OoMIX '^WT O SEAFOOD SAVINGS 

•X V wiiii THii COUPON AND AN ADOrnONAL S790 e^ 

eW V OR MOM PURCKAM Coupon good o( any *■•# Frozen SO It 

■> _ SSfSSSj'c^S^'oS'oSn^'SaiS: — Fancy Flounder Fillet it>. .£ 

■v M i«7» ______^__. ^ Frozen Dressed 16 oz Silt 

rilillirnri^rOlllllll IIIIIIICSEZIDIIIIIII IIIIIIIE2E2EE ■ = "« , » Canadian Smelts pkg 1 

Prices etlective Monday October 8 thru Saturday. October 1 3, 1979 No. responsible to. typographical errors We reserve the right ol limit quantities 



in iii coupon iiiiiii iiimi coupon mini mini coupon niniioiivesaiad 

■ llllll ^VWI'VII ■■■■■■■ — ^ •■Aiiorted Varieties 99J Freshly Sliced to C 

•■ Assorted Colors. ■ — , n oil or Water Chunk Light rT H M miim MuemsTwMMg TT IS English Chei 

»■ Decorator or Designer es #*|J|#%|/ , eiJ OT ei A /k —««eH«««g«»t»i»ood «!««»») *% Freshly Chunked Ir 

C\/l\/A « CCHICKENthiSEA S <= DUNCAN HINES O Italian Prove 

O V TIIU > _ ,^ A JS V TT.._ ■ ■■«•»*»' w f , eshfv chunked inc 

JACC tTUNA AQS £ C-CAKE CAO S AlpinoProvoloneAged \ it 79 

49° 2 2 FISH ^4V g =>SlX ■- 5y g SEAFOOD SAV|NG$ 



■VIVA 



§2tuna 

So F,SH 

O " V vytTt, ,MB l 

?» WITH TrS3 COUPON AND AN ADDITtONAl S750 e^ »^ OR MOW 

V OS MO« PURCHASE. Coupon good ot any ^ Davidsons Supermorti. 

^ Davtdton* Supermorhet Limit one coupon per ^^ ^pj Qd U n family Coupon good Oct 
aduH fomtly. Coupon good Oct - "-- 



e. PAPER •""^ 
'TOWELS 



I tHB COUPON AND ^ 



Coupon good i 



Need An Early Copy of 
Town Topics? 

You can buy one ai our office. 4 Mercer Street, 
Wednesday mornings alter 1 30 am and at 
Princeton newsstands after 1 1 



r 




THE PRINCETON SKA TING CLUB 
OPENS ITS 1 9 79-80 SEASON 




SUNDAY, OCTOBER 14th 

4-6 P.M. BAKER RINK 

SKATING— REFRESHMENTS— SKATE SALE 

PROSPECTIVE MEMBERS WELCOME 



Topirs of the Town 

MORE GIRLS THAN BOYS 
On Week's Blrthllst. In the 
week ending October 5, there 
were 27 girls and nine boys 
born in the Medical Center at 
Princeton. 

Daughters were bom to Mr. 
and Mrs. Frank Porcaro, 30 
Carnahan Place; Mr and 
Mrs. Robert C. Simmons, 
Lindbergh Road, Hopewell, 
both on September 29 ; Mr. and 
Mrs. Richard Intravartolo. 608 
Dutch Neck Road, East 
Windsor; Mr. and Mrs 
Donald Wirth, 18 Georgetown 
Road, Bordentown; Mr. and 
Mrs. George Stroup III, 100 
Stockton Street; Mr. and Mrs. 
Matthew Sudol, 108 Manlove 
Avenue, Hightstown, all on 
September 30; 

Also to Mr. and Mrs. Vin- 
cent Ficca, 21 Benford Drive, 
Princeton Junction; Mr. and 
Mrs. Aurelian Mavrodin, 7 
Lambert Lane, Robbinsville, 
both on October 1 ; Mr. and 
Mrs. Robert Goeke, 129J 
Northgate Apartments, 
Cranbury; Mr. and Mrs. 
Landon Jones, 1015 Mercer 
Road; Mr. and Mrs. Joseph 
Mattera, 2815 Fox Run Drive, 



CENTURY 21 KROL 
HONORS JAMES 




Martin P. Lombardo, Assistant Vice-President/Sales Manager, 
presents "Professional of the Month" award for September to 
Andrea James while her daughter Jennifer looks on. 

Martin Lombardo. manager of Century 21 , Krol Realtors, announced 
that Andrea James has been selected as top listing and selling 
salesperson for the month of September During that month along. Mrs. 
James marketed and/or sold just under a half million dollars of residential 
properties-no small accomplishment for an agent who decided this past 
March to go into real estate sales. 

"I had been involved in real estate management for years before 
deciding to go into the marketing field Becoming a Marketing Consultant 
was one of the best decisions I have ever made Marketing is a 
fascinating field where I can use my creative energies in presenting a 
property to the public," said Andrea. 

A local area resident all her life, Mrs James attended Monroe 
Township Schools, Hightstown High School, Drake Business College 
and Mercer County Community College In addition to managing the 
household for her husband. Leonard, and the five of their seven children 
still living at home, she is involved in the Montgomery Township 
Women's Club as Chairman of Youth & Education In her "spare" time, 
she enjoys canoeing, reading, needlework and attending the theatre as 
often as possible 

When asked why she chose Century 21 Krol with whom to 
associate, she responded that Century 21 offered the reputation for 
professionalism, advanced training through seminars, and the national 
recognition so important in today's competitive market Andrea chose 
Susan Krol's office because of the "dynamic team of professionals there. 
Susan Krol is creative, energetic and totally involved with her staff. Her 
enthusiasm is contagious. 

Broker Susan Krol and Manager Martin Lombardo are very pleased 
with Andrea's outstanding achievements and feel that her dedication to 
providing the best possible service for her clients, professional attitude 
and extensive knowledge in her field are responsible for her over- 
whelming success she is enjoying since joining the firm last spring 

If you are considering a change in careers. Marty Lombardo and 

Andrea state they would be happy to discuss the rewards of an exciting 

- n real estate with Century 21 with you. The Century 21 Krol office 

6 'ear Princeton Airport Stop in to see for yourself 

'.all us today at 924-7575 



Also to Mr. and Mrs. Donald 
Rubin, 315 Carter Road, Mr. 
and Mrs. Craig Rudolph, 53 
Evelyn Avenue, Franklin 
Park, both on October 2; Mr. 
and Mrs. William F. King, 46- 
02 Fox Run Drive, Plainsboro; 
and Mr. and Mrs. Kevin 
Moore, 5615 Gardenview 
Terrace, Hightstown. 

SCHEDULE POSTED 

For Township Pick-up. Fall 
Clean-up in Princeton 
Township will begin on 
Monday and continue through 
Friday, October 19 Pick-up 
will take place according to 
election districts. 

The schedule: Monday, 
Districts 1, 4 and 14; Tuesday, 
Districts 4, 6 and 12; Wed- 
nesday, Districts 3, 9 and 12; 
Thursday, Districts 2 and 11; 
and Friday, Districts 7, 8 and 
13. 

All materials to be picked up 
must be placed at curb-side by 
8 on the specified date. Items 
or packages heavier than one 
man can lift will not be taken. 

Brush, leaves, debris and 
grass clippings must be 
placed in closed and sealed 
containers, cartons or plastic 
bags. Paper bags or other 
fragile containers must not be 
used. 

Tree branches and twigs are 
to be securely tied in bundles 
not more than 12 inches in 
diameter with rope or twine 
(no wires). Large branches 
should be neatly stacked in 4 
foot or shorter lengths. 

Residents may call the 
Engineering Department at 
921-7077 for further in- 
formation. 

Township Administrator 
Joseph R. Nini said that debris 
from the hurricane had not 
been picked up in some 
districts in the specially 
scheduled collection in Sep- 
tember because the amount of 
hurricane damage was 
greater than the Township 
realized and because 
residents were putting out 
material other than just 
hurricane debris 



Plainsboro; Mr and Mrs. 
Wayne C Barnett, 622 Dutch 
Neck Road, East Windsor, 
Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Whitby, 
291 Elm Road; Mr and Mrs. 
Kirk D. Krieger, Wynbrook 
West, A-6, Hightstown; Mr. 
and Mrs. Robert J Dentz, 14 
Van Duyn Drive, Trenton; 

Also to Mr. and Mrs. Robert 
J. Thomas, Millstone Drive, 
Cranbury; Mr. and Mrs 
Wayne Mathiesen, 9 Aldrich 
Road, Kendal] Park; Mr. and 
Mrs. Anthony Soriero, 113 L 
Robbinsville - Allentown 
Road, Robbinsville, all on 
October 3; Mr. and Mrs 
Nicholas Honko, 1 Robertson 
Road, East Windsor; Mr. and 
Mrs Craig Hartman, 271 
Princeton Arms North, 
Cranbury; Mr. and Mrs. Ed 
Hersh, 7 Manor Ridge Drive, 
Princeton Junction; Mr. and 
Mrs. Michael Caruso, 17 
Camden Road, Belle Mead; 
Mr. and Mrs. George Matson, 
313 Conover Road, East Wind- 
sor, all on October4; 

Also to Mr. and Mrs. David 
J. Hall, 17 Meadow Lane, East 
Windsor; Mr. and Mrs. John 
Giudice, 603 Greenwich Court, 
East Windsor; Dr. and Mrs. 
Rogelio Pine, Cherry Valley 
Road; and Mr. and Mrs. Marc 
Buys, 434 Walnut Lane, all on 
October 5; 

Sons were born to Mr. and 
Mrs. Richard Mcguire, 55 New 
Sharon Road, Robbinsville, 
September 29; Mr. and Mrs. 
Howard S. Heydon, 17 Calvin 
Road, Kendall Park, Sep- 
tember 30; Mr. and Mrs. 
Arthur Hicks, 149 Voelbel 
Road, Hightstown; Mr. and 
Mrs. William Martin, RD 2, 
Box 87, Milford; Mr. and Mrs. 
Robert Radigan, 16 Oak 
Branch Road, Cranbury, all 
on October 1 ; 



CHAN'S 

^RESTAURANT 

*JgT CANTONESE 
SZECHUAN 



m 



n 



SWEATERS 

Wool blend, machine 
washable. Sizes 32-46 

Pullover: $13.99 
Button down: $15.99 

Values to $20-$25 



Bailey's 

' Princeton Shopping Center 
Mon.-Sat. 10-5:30. Fri. eve 'til 9 p 




#heEASYWEIGH ^2^ 

DIET STORE ^^pP" 

Featuring such delectables as ■- 

Diet Ice Cream • Diet Cannoli 

Diet Strudel • Diet Danish 

Our Homestyle Salad 

Complete line of frozen meals 
Take out salads & sandwiches 

We cater to your weight loss program 
Princeton Shopping Center 921 -971 2 



To Your Health, 

Princeton Shopping Center! 

PRINCETON NAUTILUS 
FITNESS CENTER 




Says Hello! 

Watch for our Grand Opening. 

Call for information on P.N.F.C.'s special 
re-conditioning programs: 921-6985. 



/ \ 

Anniversary Specials 

PICTURE FRAMES 

Selected PARTY GOODS 

BOOKS 

TOYS AND GAMES 

1 /2 PRICE 

Photo Albums Reg M 2" '6.49 

Luggage Carriers Reg '12" *7.98 

CENTER STATIONERS 



I ROBOTTI'S 
FLORIST 




Kathleen Bast, designer, graduate 
Everetts School of Floral Design 



of 



ANNIVERSARY 

SALE 

on all Platform 

TENNIS PADDLES 

also Ektelon 

RACQUETBALL RACKETS 

CENTER SPORTS 

Sporting & Athletic Equipment 
924-3713 



Great Selection of Quality 



JUNQUE 



Accumulation of 1 5 years in 
the hardware business! 



SUPER VALUES 

PRINCETON 
HARDWARE 



Old Fashioned Service 



In celebration 

ol the Princeton 

Shopping Center's 

25th Anniversary 

we are having a 

PRE- 

WINTER 

COAT 

SALE 



i mianis 10 



,*? 



nehinelH©; 



924-2442 

Mon.-Sat. 10:00-5:30 



PRINCETON SHOPPING CENTER 

N Harrison Street 
once again announces its fabulous 

SUPER GARAGE SALE 

.. . — » . . Oct .13 (rain date Oct. 20) 

this Saturday, fr0 mio-5 

Over 100 tables of treasures, collectibles, and authentic /unque' 



In addition to all this, the Princeton Shopping Center 
is celebrating its 25th year! 

Besides our merchants offering you their fantastic Anniversary Sales on tables right 

outside their stores. The Merchants Association will hold a 

Grand Drawing for: 



1 . A free weekend in New York City tor two — 
2 nights at the St Mortiz Hotel 
plus a Broadway Show and more' 
2. $25 gift certificates trom twenty-seven stores 
at the Shopping Center 
(Just fill out coupon at table on center ot Mall, 
deposit it, and your name may be picked' 
Drawing will be held on Sat. Oct 13 at 3:00 





itles" 
unlimited 



BOOKSELLERS 

HUNDREDS OF 
BOOKS 

$ 5 OR LESS 



tPUSICCEUHlL 

^^ ™ titles unlimited l 



HUNDREDS OF 
RECORDS 

$ 5 OR LESS 



SUPER SA VINGS ON CLASSICAL 
SHEET MUSIC 




i'/l=».<tH*k 

"Mini-Fiesta" 
8 Days/7 Nights 

Inclusive Tour Charters — 
From $399. 

Saturday Departure Through December IS 

Impress travel 

609-924-1900 



HOME DECOR 



Curtains-Draperies-Bedspreads-Lampshades 
PRINCETON SHOPPING CENTER 921 -7296 

QUILTED BEDSPREADS 

Assorted discontinued patterns reduced from stock 

Regularly SALE 

Twin '40-50 '20 

Full '50-60 '30 

King or Queen '60-80 '40 



All Sterling Silver 

FLATWARE 

in stock 

Reduced 60% 

GORHAM • INTERNATIONAL 
REED & BARTON • MANY OTHERS 

Limited Time Only 

** JEWflERS 



FRIDAY & SATURDAY ONLY 
ALL LIGHTING j/w 



FIXTURES 



OFF 
LIST 

PRICE 



20 



0Z usV TABLE 

I* price & FLOOR LAMPS 



the* 



ight gallery < 




WOVEN WOODS & MINI BLINDS 

Featuring 

KIRSCH • JOANNA 

BAMBOO ABBOTT 



20% 



Ooff 



CUSTOM DRAPERIES 

Featuring 20% 

WAVERLY • PERMELL I0 

DECORATOR INDUSTRIES ™ 0/ » 

BURLINGTON HOUSE 3V/0 °" 



RODS 

Kirsch Atavio Traverse 
and Atavio Cafe Rods 



50% 



Ooff 



BATHROOM FIXTURES 
Chateau Ensemble ^fl9/ 

by Kirsch •» U /0 off 



MANY OTHER UNADVERTISED SPECIALS 



- Tttpks of the Touii 

2 YWCA PLANS PROGRAM 
5" On Mid-Ufe Changes. "The 
s Second Half of Your Life," a 
m day for men and women, will 
° be sponsored by the adult 
o department of the Princeton 
°. YTVCA on Saturday. October 
< JO. from 9-2:45 at the YM- 
g YWCA on Paul Robeson 
J Place. 

o The day of workshops will 

j provide a chance for men and 

J women to explore the 

z developmental stage of mid- 

z ' life as a special challenge. It 

o will be a time for discovering 

g latent talents and an op- 

z portunity for personal growth, 

g change and reaffirmation, 

m - according to Marge Smith, 

o chairman of the Adult 

§ Program Committee. 

P Registration forms are 

| included in the YWCA fall 

o brochure and will also be 

p available at the YWCA, and 

the Princeton Public Library. 

The fee will be f 10 for the day, 

including lunch. For persons 

over 60, the fee will be *5 The 

nursery will be available for 

children over 1 at a nominal 

fee. 

For further information, 
call the YWCA at 9244825, act. 
22 or 28. 

RUN TO END HUNGER 
Then Bear Dick Gregory. A 
group of Princeton relay 
runners, led by lrv Urken and 
Joan Bartl, will join the 
second annual "End of 
Hunger Run" when it passes 
through Princeton next 
Wednesday, October 17. 

On Saturday, October 20, 
Dick Gregory will be the 
featured speaker at a Prin- 
ceton Hunger Conference on 
the Princeton University 
campus. The public is invited 
to hear Mr. Gregory at 8 p.m 
in McCosh 50 at a ticket price 
of K i Jl for students) Tickets 
may be obtained at The 
Country Mouse, 164 Nassau, or 
by mail to the Conference, 152 
Guyot Avenue, Princeton, 
N.J. 08540. 

The Princeton running 
contingent will run south on 
Route 206 and Route One, 
starting about 9 a.m. on 
October 17 The northern leg 
of the run will start in East- 
port, Maine, on October 13. 

The run, sponsored by 
World Runners, an AAU- 
Chartered club, is to help raise 
SI million in contributions to 
organizations working to end 
world hunger. Runners and 
contributors in New Jersey 
have pledged $75,000. Runners 
themselves will give to the 
organization of their choice, 
and are inviting contributors 
to do the same, by sponsoring 
a run on a per-mile or lump 
sum basis. 

Runners who would like to 
join are invited to call Mr. 
Urken at 799-2248 or 9243076 
Contributions made out to the 
organization chosen by the 
donor, may be mailed to 
World Runners, Suite 107, 1260 
21st Street, N W . Washington, 
DC 20036 



BID N- BUY SATURDAY 

In Rocky H1U. For the 14th 
consecutive year, the 
residents of Rocky Hill are 
busy preparing for the annual 
Bid'n' Buy fair and auction 
which will be held this 
Saturday from 10 to 5. 

Panicaro Park, on Route 518 
in Rocky Hill, will be tran- 
sformed into an old fashioned 
fairgrounds with an auction 
under the big tent This fund 
raising event benefits the 
Rocky Hill Community Group 
which sponsors many ac- 
tivities within the community, 
supports the Mary Jacobs 
Memorial Library and 
maintains the Historic 
Community Center on 
Washington Street 

This year's chairmen, Pat 
Croat. Sam Bahadurian and 
LaVeroe Hetoert, have an- 
that a significant 




PHOTOGRAPHY 

JOHN SIMPSON 

924-6497 



Marsh & Co. 

ISSNaaaau 824-44)00 



WILL MONOPOLY HELP? Financial planning for the later stages In life is not a 
game, say Mrs. Landon Peters (left) and James Thornton. It is, however, the topic 
of one of 11 workshops planned for men and women by the YWCA for a day on 
"The Second Half of Your Life" on Satu rday, October 20. c-> »°<**"". w°'°' 

percentage 
go toward the 



WliMrftK 



TURNOVERS FLAMBE 
A La Smoke. Mrs. Hedvig 



trees along the streets of •»« E™" A ^"^ Koppanyi, 138 Alexander 



Rocky HiU. 



activities will introduce a 
feature, the Gong Show 

Many of the attractions %?*?*«, I^SE ^ P lZ range Thureda'y'e^eni'ng when 
-ui ^....u.. the creative talents of the som 6 e o( u^ ingredients fell out 



Street, was baking four 
blueberry turnovers in her gas 



have become a tradition at the 

..j - ~, K „,jii „„„ community, and white 

„ {? . r b ..!^T^ <^P>> a "< has a multitude of 
again have a wide assortment , , reasures . al pre .inflation 
of Holland bulbs along with a prices 
selection of plants and mums. 



and started a fire. 

While Mrs. Koppanyi was 
turning off the oven and 



Dear Customer, 

My apologies for any inconvenience 
caused to you while I am relocating my 
business. 

At my new location, in the old Kresges 
store in the Princeton Shopping Center, I 
will carry the same quality fabrics and give 
the same personal service, plus an added 
feature - ample parking. 

Thank you for all the support you have 
given me in this move. 



Sincerely, 
Lucille Carnevale 
The Fabric Shop 
formerly 14 Chambers St. 




sX 



Princeton Savings has 

The Rates 

You Can't 
Afford to Miss! 





26-Week Money Market Certificate 

11.137 1 10.662 

$10,000 Minimum • 26-Week Maturity 
Rate Available Week of October 11 - October 17 
•This is an effective annual yield assuming reinvestment of principal and Interest at maturity 
ne at the same interest rate At the time of renewal, your interest might be higher or lower than the 
yield shown Federal regulations prohibit compounding of interest on 26-week certificates 

New 4-Year Savings Certificate 

9.00* 

Effective Annuel Yield On 

8.SO* 

Rate Available for the month of October 

$500 Minimum • 4- Year Maturity 

Rale announced at the beginnning of each month 

guaranteed for the full 4-year term 



vided a substantial u 



We pay the highest legal rates and yields on all other accounts too. 

Where people make the difference! 

Princeton Savings 

AND LOAN ASSOCIATION ^S 



32 Nassau Si (6091 9240076 • Lawn 

200 E Mam St (201) 725 3737 • Bed. „ 

Plainsboro 503 Plainsboro Rd (6091 7999393 

Member FSL 



2431 Main St (609)896 1550 
inglon Rd (2011234 0993 



_J 



Topia of the Town 



opening the window, Engine 
Company No. 1 was respon- 
ding with two trucks and eight 
firemen They used a fan to 
clear the house of smoke. 

At 2:20 Sunday morning, 
Borough police received a call 
that the bulletin board on the 
corner of Nassau and 
Witherspoon was on fire. 

Unfortunately, the patrol 



car was engaged in another 
investigation at the time and 
could not respond im- 
mediately Fortunately, 
employees at nearby Victor's 
Pizzeria, 86 Nassau, were not 
engaged and they ex- 
tinguished the fire. Damage 
was light 



TWO COFFEES PLANNED 
By Parents Group. Two 
neighborhood coffees spon- 
sored by the Princeton 



Princeton Committee for 
Special Education will be held 
next week. Parents of 
Riverside children are invited 
to meet at the home of Maxine 
and Steve Farmer, 48 Philip 
Drive, on Monday at 8. 

Sharon and Mike Tomalin, 
194 Clover Lane, are hosting 
the coffee for middle school 
parents on Wednesday, 
October 17, at 8. Those who 
would like to talk with other 
parents about remedial 
programs, supplemental 



instruction, the child study 
team, classification 
procedures and other matters 
are invited. For further in- 
formation, call Mrs. Tomalin, 
924-5009 or Mrs. Farmer 924- 
6815. 

PARENTS DAY PLANNED 
At Hun School. Parents Day 
at The Hun School has been set 
for this Saturday.. The day 
will begin with registration 
and coffee at 8:30 in the study 
hall of the Academic Center. 



After a brief general 
meeting in the auditorium, 
parents will be invited to 
follow their children's 
schedules and to attend short 
classes. In addition to meeting 
teachers, parents will have an 
opportunity to become 
acquainted with classroom 
procedures and curriculum. 

Following class visits and 
preceding lunch in the school 
dining hall, parents will attend 
a joint meeting of the fathers' 



and mothers' associations. 
George E Claffey, Jr , 
president of the Fathers' 
Association, and Mrs. Robert 
L Ingham, co-chairman of the 
Mothers' Association, will 
report on the activities of their 
respective organizations. 

Athletic events, including 
field hockey, girls' soccer, 
boys' junior varsity and 
varsity soccer, and football, 
are scheduled from 11 a.m. 
throughout the afternoon. 

Pas* 10 



Color TVs, VCRs and 
Grandfather Clocks for Savers 

Available at Every Office of 
First National State Bank of Central Jersey 



DEPOSIT FOR 4YRS. 



$1,400 



$1,500 



$2,000 



$3,200 



YOU RECEIVE 




19" COLOR TV by Magnavox, 
100% Solid State, Automatic 
Color Leveling and Fine 
Tuning. Model #4332. 



SETH THOMAS BRANFORD 
MODEL GRANDFATHER 
CLOCK, Solid-Wood Cabinet, 
Circular Brass Weights and 
Pendulum. Model H4424 





19" PUSH BUTTON COLOR 

TV by Magnavox, Remote 
Control, Videomatic Touch- 
Tone, Illuminated Digital 
Channel Display, 100% 
Solid State. Model H4245. 



MAGNAVOX VHS VIDEO 
CASSETTE RECORDER, 2/4 

Hour Capability, Pride of 
the Line... A Complete Home 
Entertainment Center. 
Model U8220. 




INTEREST 



In Lieu 

of 
Interest 



In Lieu 

of 
Interest 



In Lieu 
of 

Interest 



In Lieu 

of 
Interest 



No additional cost (or delivery ii 



il State Bank of Central Jersey 



INSTANT INTEREST TO ENJOY NOW....BEFORE 
YOUR TIME DEPOSIT MATURES! 



Walk into any First National State Bank office. Open 
a time deposit account, and become the owner 
of a Magnavox Color TV... Magnavox Home 
Entertainment Center/Video Cassette Recorder, or 
Seth Thomas Branford Model Grandfather clock - 
depending on which of the plans you select. 

It is an offer that will let you get a step ahead of 
inflation since you will be enjoying these items at 
today's prices before inflation takes its course. Compare 
the value received with area retail prices ..and see 
what an opportunity this is. You get the item you 
choose, including installation, now. When your time 
deposit matures, you get your initial deposit back. 



Federal regulations require a substantial Interest penally lor early withdrawal 
Member FDIC. 



i 



First 

National 

State 



FIRST NATIONAL STATE BANK OF CENTRAL 
JERSEY Executive Olfice Brunswick 4 Olden 
Avenues. Trenlon. N J Telephone 609-396-4060 
Offices at Chambers & East Howell Streets. 
Trenton, N J • 44 West Stale Street. Trenton. N J 
• 2673 Main Street. Lawrenceville. N J MEMBER 
FIRST NATIONAL STATE BANCORPORATION • 
Assets Over $2 Billion • MEMBER FDIC 



In the Heart 
of Princeton 



Yes! Shopping CAN be fun! 



sh6p 



Two convenient Park & Shop lots: 

• corner of Chambers and Hulfish 

• the Playhouse Theatre lot 



Ask any of these co-operating merchants to put a 
stamp on your parking card. Each stamp is worth 
15° toward your parking fee. You'll avoid parkin g 
f ines this simple way . 



Applegate Floral Shop 
Borg's Custom Tailors 
Harry Ballot, Clothier 
Brophy's Shoes 

HP. Clayton's 
Cousins Company 
The Clothes Line 
The Country Squire 

Ediths 

The English Shop 

Walter B. Howe, Inc. 
Houghton Real Estate 
Hulifs Shoes 



Kalen's Fine Arts 
Kopp's Cycle Shop 
Karelia 



Lahiere's Restaurant 
La Jolie Coiffure 
Langrock's 
Luttmann's Luggage 
LaVake's Jewelers 
Landau's 



G.R. Murray, Inc. 

Nassau Inn 

The Nassau Pharmacy 
Nassau Shoe Tree 
Nassau Delicatessen 



Princeton Bank & Trust Co. 
Princeton Book Mart 
Princeton Decorating Shop 
Princeton Music Center 
The Prep Shop 
Princeton Army-Navy Store 



Revere Travel 
The Silver Shop 



The Town Shop 
Toto's Market 

Urken Supply Co., Inc. 



PEOPLE 
In The News 



Ensign Martha J. Dorgan. 
daughter of Dr Jean N. 
Dorgan of Plainsboro and Dr 
Joseph C. Dorgan of 
Jamesburg, has been ac- 
cepted to attend the Naval 
Flight Training Program in 
Pensacola, Fla., for pilot 
training. 

Ensign Dorgan is presently 
stationed with Fleet Logistics 
Support Squadron 24 in 
Sigonella, Sicily, where she is 
Communications, Schedules 
and Navagations Officer. She 
is a graduate of Princeton 
High School and Villanova 
University. She reports to her 
new duty station in March. 

Among six seniors at the 
Hun School who have received 
letters of commendation in the 
National Merit Scholarship 
Program are Robert Flory, 
son of Mr. and Mrs. Robert E. 
Flory of 83 Adams Drive, and 
Marianne McCarroll, 
daughter of Dr. and Mrs. 
William McCarroll of 14 
Monroe Avenue, Lawren- 
ceville. 

A tomato weighing 2.78 
pounds and grown by Joseph 
McMahon of 10 Hereford 
Drive, Princeton Junction, 
was tied for second place in 
the second annual Cham- 
pionship Tomato Weigh-in 
sponsored by the New Jersey 
Department of Agriculture. 

Navy Operations Specialist 
2nd Class Ivory Jackson Jr., 
son of Mr. and Mrs. Jackson of 
44 Dublin Road, Pennington, 
has departed for a deployment 
in the Western Pacific. He is a 
crew member aboard the 
guided missile cruiser, USS 
Bainbridge, home-ported in 
San Diego 

A 1970 graduate of Princeton 
High School, and a 1973 
graduate of Mercer County 
Community College with an 
Associate of Arts degree, Mr. 
Jackson joined the Navy in 
November 1975. 

Walter C. Ellis of Princeton 
High School was named a 
semi-finalist in the 16th annual 
National Achievement 
Scholarship Program for 
Outstanding Negro Students. 
His selection was based on 
achievement in the 1978 PSAT- 
NMSQT tests. As a semi- 
finalist he now continues in the 
competition for about 650 
achievement scholarships to 
be awarded in the spring. 



Mary E. Druedlng, 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
Albert J. Drueding, Jefferson 
Road, is a member of the 
equestrain team at Colby- 
Sawyer College, New London, 
N.H. 





" 



.Vij 

Alex Newton of 90 Dempsey 
Avenue is a member of the 
1979 Kenyon College football 
team. He is a graduate of the 
La wrenceville School. 



A story by Elizabeth Starr' 
Hill, 24 Woodside Lane, ap- 
pears in the September issue 
of "Cricket" magazine. The 
story is entitled, "Why Wasn't 
I Asked to the Party?" 

Mrs. Hill is the author of 
seven books, and many 
magazine stories and articles 
for both children and adults. 
She is also a sales associate in 
the Princeton office of realtor 
JohnT. Henderson. 

Joseph J. Felcone, 60 Jef- 
ferson Road, has been elected 
to the Board of Trustees of the 
Genealogical Society of New 
Jersey. 

Founded in 1921, the 
society's major function is to 
collect, preserve and 
disseminate genealogical 
information pertaining to New 
Jersey families. In addition to 
its scholarly journal, "The 
Genealogical Magazine of 
New Jersey," now in its 54th 
year of publication, the 
society maintains an ex- 
tensive genealogical research 
library in New Brunswick, 
conducts periodic seminars 
and public programs 
throughout the state, and 
attempts to assist both 
members and non-members 
who are seeking data on their 
New Jersey ancestors. 

Mr. Felcone serves on the 
boards of several historical 
organizations in New Jersey; 
he is a vice-president of the 
Historical Society of Prin- 
ceton. 

Harvey Musikoff of 9-04 
Hunters Glen, Plainsboro, has 
been appointed chief 
executive officer at Trenton 
Psychiatric Hospital. He has 
served as acting chief 
executive officer since May. 

Dr. Musikoff, 34, received a 
Ph.D. in rehabilitation 
counseling from New York 
University in 1974. He has 
been with Trenton Psychiatric 
since October, 1977, and 
before that held a number of 
positions including adjunct 
assistant professor of 
psychology at the New York 
Institute of Technology and 
clinical instructor in 
psychiatry at Albert Einstein 
College of Medicine. 

He currently serves as a 
psychology consultant at the 
Yardville Youth Correction 
Institute and teaches 
rehabilitation counseling at 
New York University. 

Susan Slchel, daughter of 
Mrs. Frank Taplin of Armour 
Road, was the photographer 
for a book written by her 
husband, Vincent Panella, 
entitled, "The Other Side: 
Growing Up Italian in 
America." 

The book is a candid portrait 
of an immigrant culture from 
a third-generation per- 
spective Mr. Panella por- 
trays his family in Italian 
villages and American neigh- 
borhoods as a means of un- 
derstanding his roots. 

Ms Sichel has contributed 
her own photographs of 
various members of her 
husband's family and has 
selected others from family 
albums The couple are 
currently living in West 
Brattleboro, Vt 



William S. Field of 256 
Edgerstoune Road has been 
promoted to senior vice- 
president of Prudential 
Insurance Company's newly- 
formed asset management 
department. The new 
department headed by Mr. 
Field will be responsible for 
the company's activity in 
publicly traded bond and 
preferred stock issues, as well 
as the investments of two 
subsidiaries, the Prudential 
Property and Casualty 
Insurance Co., and the 
Prudential Reinsurance Co. 

Mr. Field, who joined 
Prudential in 1953, served in 
vice presidential posts in the 
bond, common stock and real 
estate investment areas 
before transferring to the 
company's Northeastern 
home office in Boston in 1971. 
He returned to Newark in the 
economic investment and 
research department in 1973 
and was assigned to the asset 
management group last year. 

Kendall S. Harmon of 35 
Manning Lane has been 
designated a James Bowdoin 
Scholar at Bowdoin College, 
Brunswick, Maine. The 
scholarship is an honorary one 
which recognizes academic 
achievement. He is a 
sophomore. 

Dan Miller, son of Mrs. Julia 
K . Miller of 21 Jefferson Road, 
and Quentln Neater, son of Mr. 
and Mrs. W.C. Nester of 12 
Camelia Court, Lawren- 
ceville, are members of the 
soccer team at Heidelberg 
College in Tiffin, Ohio. 

Miller, a starting halfback, 
drew praise from the coach 
for his play in the season 
opener. He is a freshman and 
a graduate of Princeton High 
School. Nester is a sophomore 
and a graduate of Lawren- 
ceville High School North. 



Kieran Esposlto, son of Mr 
and Mrs Wilson Esposito, 196 
John Street, has earned a 
berth on the varsity football 
squad at Muskingum College, 
New Concord, Ohio. 

A 6-0, 160-pound freshman 
defensive back, he graduated 
from Princeton High School, 
where he lettered in football, 
track, basketball and 
baseball. Mr. Esposito was 
also named to the All-Mercer 
County football first team and 
the All-Area Delaware Valley 
football second team 



RANDALL HAGADORHH 





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Icelandic Woolen Items 

For Men, Women, 

& Children 

You Save 50% Or More 

On A Special Grouping Of 

Icelandic Woolens— The Warmest, 

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Products In All The World. 

Jackets • Coats • Ponchos 

Sweaters • Blankets • Long Skirts 

Hats • Mittens • And More 

We've just returned from Iceland with the overstocks, discon- 
tinued styles, prototypes, and samples from every major Ice- 
landic woolen mill and manufacturer. A tremendous variety. 
All first quality, excellent values. . .many styles directly from our 
previous catalogs, other overruns still in current production. 
Such a wide selection you must come in and see for your- 
self. NO telephone or mail orders, please. 

Hurry In! 

Sale Ends Saturday 

October 13th 

Our 1979-1980 catalog merchandise is also on display at regular prices 



Special Sal* Hour*: 
Monday and Friday: 9:30*00 
Tues., Wed., Ttiurs.: 9:3O«:00 
Saturday: 9:30-6:00 

•All reduced price sales are final. 
1 1 4 Nassau Street 
Princeton, NJ. 

World's largest selection of Icelandic Woolens 






OBITUARIES 



£ Mrs. Helen M. Barrel! 
O Sullivan. 81. who lived with 
i» her daughter Mrs. Richard J. 
2 Hughes at 90 Westcott Road. 
2 died October 4 in Princeton 
z Medical Center 
ui Mrs. Sullivan was born in 
* Bradley Beach and lived in 
-> Trenton for 50 years before 
2 . moving to Princeton 14 years 
g ago. She was the wife of the 
*- late Joseph R. Sullivan, 
u In addition to Mrs. Hughes, 
5 she is survived by another 
a daughter. Mrs. Claire S. 
g* McQuade of Durham, N.C ; 
S two sons. William P of 
o Fairfield. Calif . and John L. 
z of Mobile, Ala : 30 grand- 
5 children and several great- 
2 grandchildren. She was also 
the mother of the late Joseph 
R. Sullivan Jr. 

Mass of Christian Burial 
was celebrated in St. Paul's 
Church with burial in St. 
Mary's Cemetery. Trenton. 
The family requests that 
donations in lieu of flowers be 
made to Morris Hall Home for 
the Aged. Lawrenceville. 

Mrs. Bessie Sharp Hunt, 88, 
of Lawrenceville, died 
October 4 in Princeton 
Medical Center. 

Mrs. Hunt was a native of 
Trenton and the wife of the 
late Charles J Hunt. She was 
a member of the Nassau 
Presbyterian Church of 
Princeton and a former 
member of the Hamilton 
Avenue Methodist Church of 
Trenton. 

Surviving are a son Charles 
J. Hunt Jr. of Princeton; and 
three grandchildren. Charles 
D Hunt of Plainsboro, Mrs. 
Cynthia Latham of Princeton 
and Stephen T. Hunt, also of 
Princeton 

The service was held at a 
Trenton funeral home with 
burial in Riverview Cemetery. 

Arnold G. Cameron, Jr. died 
at his home in Warrenton, Va., 
on September 27. 

He was the son of the late 
Dr. and Mrs. Cameron of 
Princeton. He is survived by 
bis wife, Julia Keith Cameron 
of Warrenton and a brother. 
D Pierre G Cameron of 
Coconut Grove. Fla 

Mr. Cameron attended 
Phillips Academy. Andover, 
and graduated in 1924 from 



Yale University. Con- 
tributions may be made to the 
First Aid Squad of Warrenton, 
Va 

Mrs. Dorothy M. Zapalac. 
SI, of Skillman Road, 
Skillman. died October 6 at 
her home after a long illness. 

Mrs. Zapalac was a realtor 
with the Walter B. Howe 
Gallery of Homes for the past 
six years. She was active in 
commercial real estate 
development. 

Born in Hallettsville, Tex , 
she had lived in Skillman for 
20 years She received her BS 
degree from the University of 
Texas. 

Surviving are two sons, 
Thomas of Stinton, Tex., and 
James, at home, and a 
daughter, Miss Mary Zapalac, 
also at home. 

Mass of Christian Burial 
was celebrated at St. Paul's 
Church with burial in St. 
Paul's Cemetery. Memorial 
contributions may be made to 
the Montgomery Township 
Rescue Squad. 

7'<y«s of the Town 

Conflnueolromp.Bul! 

After the varsity football 
game, parents and students 
are invited to join Acting 
Headmaster and Mrs 
Donaldson and members of 
the faculty for tea in the 
Student Activities Center 



PUBLICITY IS TOPIC 
Of YWCA Workshop. Jeanne 
Silvester, Woman's Director 
at WHWH and a publicity 
volunteer for numerous 
community organizations, will 
lead a "Basics of Publicity" 
workshop on Wednesday 
October 17, from 9:30 to 11:30 
at the YWCA. 

The workshop, which is part 
of the YWCA skills training for 
volunteers series, will cover 
many aspects of publicity, 
including how to write press 
releases, whom to contact for 
publicity, scheduling and 
format. The fee is $3 and 
nursery is available for 
children over 1. For pre- 
registration information call 
9244825. ext 28. 



PUBLIC WELCOME 
To Folk Dance Sessions. The 
Princeton Folk Dance Group 
has resumed its indoor dances 
and is holding Tuesday 
evening sessions every week 
at Riverside School from 8 to 
11. 



The Group has a repertoire 
of dances from most of the 
countries of Europe, the 
Middle East, and North 
America, from the simplest 
walking dances to fast ones of 
great complexity. The public 
is welcomed to the sessions, 
which start with free in- 
struction from 8 to 9. No 
previous dance experience 
and no partners are 



necessary. 

The Group will sponsor 
several special events during 
the year, mostly workshops 
designed to enlarge its 
repertoire of ethnic music and 
dance. Planned so far is a 
Halloween costume party to 
be held on Tuesday, October 
30 For more information, call 
924-7350 or 921-1462. 



CHILDREN ARE TOPIC certified school psychologist 
Of Workshop. "Coping with m New Jersey will discuss 
Children is the first in a series Coping with Children" on 
of public workshops offered by 0c,0 °! r "• 20 and " fr <>ni 2-4 
the Multimodal Therapy P- m The admission fee is $5 or 
Institute of 28 Main Street, *?.S0 per couple. For further 
Kingston. information call 924-8010. 

Dr. Howard Rappapart, 

senior staff psychologist at S0METH , N0 M „ „ w ,„ „,„ T 
Somerset County Community Town topics classified, can ntnx 
Mental Health Center and a ' M " y 



I 



For the best in Scandinavian 

See Our Exciting 

Contemporary Designs 




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p=^ 2M NASSAU ST , PBINCfTOK. N J., PHOME 92*9624 
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-:.',: PARK HQ '■ ' JRDOOR 



Money begins 
at home 




Secondary Mortgage 
Loans up to $25,000. 

Home is where the money is! If you need 
extra cash for just about any worthwhile 
reason you can name — college education, 
to start a new business, for home 
improvement, a new heating plant or central 
air conditioning, for bill consolidation, to buy a 
vacation house or recreational vehicle, to 
take a trip to anywhere — you can borrow up 
to $25,000 based on the equity in your home. 

Check the money-saving advantages 
of our Secondary Mortgage Loans 

• No closing costs. 

• No application fees. 

• No appraisal fees. 

• No prepayment penalties 



There's no place like First National 

Bank of Princeton for a low-cost 

Secondary Mortgage Loan! To get all 

the details and an application, mail the 

coupon below or call Hoyt Scharff at 

(609)921-6100. 



United 

OJersey 

BanKs 



The First National Bank 
of Princeton _« 

90 Nassau Street, Princeton N.J. 08540 



Main: 90 Nassau Sireei Branches: East Nassau 0tf.ee 370 East Nassa 

(Near Harrison) ■ • West Windsor OHice. 40 Washington 
Road- • Lawrence Township OHice. Pnnceton Pike- • Princeton 
Commerce Center, 29 Emmons Drive, 8ldg E (ott Rt 1) 
• Plainsboro Ottice. 607 Plainsboro Road • Windsor Plaza 
Office. Pnncetoo-Hightstown Road, Princeton Junction • 
phone: (609) 921-6100 'dnve-m berimes 



& 



A 

Ja, ^ — 

^^m The National ^^^ 

^^T Banhot Princeton ^^^ 

^^»f 90 Nassau St. ^^ 

^^ Princeton. N J 08540 ^^L 

«^V Please send me more information and^^^ 
^^W a Secondary Mortgage Loan application ^ ^^ 

^^T ADDRESS ^^k 
^ C,TV STATE zip ^* 



CONSUMER 
BUREAU 



oo 



Approved BY Consumers FOR Consumers^: 

a ■),,&£_ r_ • Fuel Oil & Oil Burners • Landstaoino Contractors: • Painting. Paper Hanging: f 

• BuWng Contractor* NAssAuoiLsai.»i-s«r»i t , ..?»-•"-'■•'_':.:•_-. »ck„o™iei~_ 2 



• Furniture, Custom Made: 



REGISTERED j£«S££a3rn 

■ A -. . i • Bulling Materials and Lumber 

LOCAL BELLE MEAD LUmt.r. I«. ■ Ml 

BUSINESS E-SfJSW-KBSSMa 

--. ■» - k- Bk _ _ GROVER LUMBER CO. Everything (01 

pfOPlf; r o p"^,r— """~" 

• Antique Dealers, Auctioneeis: • Camping Equipment 



• Furniture Dealers: 







• Laundries: 


o Shop Ctr «* 



• Lawn, Garden it Farm 
Sudd Ef Equip: Repairs: 



• Shoe Repair Shops: 



• SkUoq Contractors: 



n SQ 5aa 07)8 * Cm&t Shops: «rvica ;y» Nassau wi''«B< SONs"r";S. p°ri ' W 

"r^AppETi'se'r's.' 'awra cnKoii C t« N Mfgay°novtTt*n * furniture, Re-finishing: • Lighting Fixtures: 



J^"« • Pharmacies: 



• Sporting Goods: 

Sporting Goods A Camping Equlpmant. 



a»StataRd,,Prlncalon? 



• Antiques: 



• Apartments: 



• Furniture Unpointed: 



1873 Quaker Bnage Rd , Lawrncvt *57 

ic- • Garbage b Ti ash Removal: 



■m'pwi K V i°.i™»* TC »aiet N al • P**"" Equipment ft Service: ? E fS!SSi "^ 



Liquor Stores: 



; & • Carpet Et Rug Cleaning: 

" al J.C.L. Carpal a Upholltary Cleaning I 



ninrs * ^'" m 0B "' ers: 
omplele NOLDE'S PIANOS 

AAontg 



Appliance Repairs: 



ppTng • Men ' s Clothing Shops: 



• Plumbing Et Heating 
Contractors: 

J.W. OINATALE Plumbing A Healing 



• Stoves. Wood: 



Appliance Sales Et Service: 



.op«"7dayi a) Children's Wear: 



• An Needlework: 

Everythln 






• Chimney Clng. El Rprg.: 



• Auto Body Repair Shops: 

BODY SHOP By Harold William 



• Cleaning Et Pressing: 



• Clothing: 



• Coin Et Stamp Dealers: 



CONSUMER 
BUREAU 



OO 

REGISTERED 



• Auto Dealers: 



' # Gourmet Shops Ef Foods: 



• Greenhouses; plants: 



• Moiorcycle Dealers: 

S Hwy JCP. Flemlngton ?Q1 783-8779 

• Moving b Storage: 



Broad. Trenton iv.i .is" 



■nplete Printing Servl 

set Printing - Fast S 

minu TypsMttlng. Bond Copl> 

bber Stamps; Notary I 

te Rd. (US 306) Bldg. 

>LICA Lowest prices; 



• Surgical Supply Et Equip. Dlrs: 



££' • Sw <mming Pools: Sales Et Svce: 



• Real Estate Agents: 

CENTURY II Cernegle Realty 



1001 PRINCETON 

Princeton Shopping CtrWl 6*182 



Foreign Can, 



,Rtes304«.si8. • Travel Agencies 



.1ST & BARRISTER 



out service • Haircutiing. Hairstyling: 



• Dog Grooming: 



* E D TA r, PE f 'p S v liP MACH e m S E h0 c , ? s : ,o m • Hardware Stores: 



Open 7 days Caterlr 



• Nurserymen; Nurseries: 



- DECORATORS 



, • Health Foods: 



i. 7SMaln, Kingston? 



# Driving Schools: 

Special care to 



• Auto Parts Dealers: 



• Electrical Contractors: 



# Heating Contractors: 



• Office Furniture Et Equip. Olrs; 



1 Office Machine, Calculator 
Et Typewriter Dealers: 



• Tree Service: 

SHEARER Tree Surgeons. 






• Typing: 



• Auto Radiators: 



• Organ Dealers: 

Flemlngton (Wmln 



• Roofing Contractors: 

ROOFII 1 



ipeciaMies, • Upholsterers 

AD Elegant Upholstery. 75 Main, Kingston 9 

• Upholstery Cleaning: 

^n6ChVrnKr*%ren h m'!s7, ' 



• 7uro7eZrbS^tl T : "*""' ^l?E h R y Ts,iHs? i Ssoc.ATES Z^^JS^S^m^o^ ?««? ^ISsTi-c. Pam.,, KSfXgSfASOi '" C • Vacuum Cleaner D, 



Dealers: 

VACUUM C 



• Exterminators: 



t) I nsulatjon Contractors: 
'u»'e • Insurance Agents: 



• Water Conditioning: 



:a "> • Fireplaces Et Accessories: 



• Fish; Seafood Dealers: 



• Floor Covenng Contractors: 



• S"* 1 * b ^ Associations: # Wndow 9udn . Venetn Blnds: 



' # Interior Designers: interior & T^aVrefs "'.T'niVed Lw?\aVM*nan"sxi\ocan* 

aoot o^l e Ro«d"e a Ra no p"«!."47f / "ch™ %**£»£"? crfw^ni^o* Ve* * Sewing Machine Dealers: 



• Jewelers; Jewelry Shops: 



• Auto Tops Et Upholstery: • Florists: 



' es ' • Kitchen Cabinets: 



• Food Markets: 



.->'■-. co • Landscapiiig Contractors: 



, • Fruits Et Vegetables 

_ Kingston (opp Shop Rltei 9 



*0UR PROMISE TO PRINCETON CONSUMERS: 

eft^T* IF VOU HAVE A COMPLAINT against any local business firm, just 
caJI 394-5700 and a Consumer Bureau representative will respond and in- 
vestigate; then, 

W C^ IF CONSUMER BUREAUS ALL-CONSUMER PANEL AGREES WITH 
YOU, the business firm involved has only two choices either satisfy your 
complaint promptly or lose its Consumer Bureau Registration 

"C^r* DON'T STAY MAO at any business firm - unit, you first give Consumer 
Bureau a chance to help straighten matters out CM (609) 394-5 700 any time 
ol any day or night and a Consumer Bureau representative will go into action 
There is no charge . 




ESTABLISHED 1967 
£S£» M3 394-5700 

• MOT a Bettei Business 8u'e» 



MAILBOX 



meetings required in order to 
obtain agreement on the 
numerous matters involved. 

Some people question 
whether the socio-economic 
community of Princeton -- 
some 26,000 people - is now or 
potentially will be so big that it 
if it should pass, would have should be divided into two or 
on the board. I urge any in- more governmental districts 



NOTICE 
Letters lo TOWN TOPICS 
Mailbox" should be typed, 
double-spaced, signed and 
received for publication no 
later than Monday No letter 
will be printed without a valid 



a run 



addrr 



Letters longer than 500 
words may be edited or 
omitted entirely, at the 
discretion of the editor 
Letters on subjects not 
specifically related to the 
Princeton area may also be 
rejected 



=lGI==gj 
THE TOMATO FACTORY * 



g Small Is Beautiful 
- To the Editor of Town Took- . 

< The hole in the doughnut! I (bviduals who are interested rather than be combined into 
a have lived in the Borough of in this topic to attend. one I submit that even with 

£ Princeton since 1935. coming ROBIN L WALLACK 30.000 to 35,000 people (which 

a to this unique, beautiful town President, Board of Education should be our maximum), our 

j as a bnde Small is beautiful. public officials in Borough 

_• Manv of my good friends in Editor'! Note: As Mrs. Hall or the Valley Road 
z both 'Borough and Township Wallack points out, Mr. Pike's building will still be very easy 
z also feel that we have co- letter was not used as pro- to reach and government will 

° existed with a minimum of consolidation material still be "close to the people " a small group of social 
"j problems and are so fortunate provided by the Board of At the same time, with one planners now proposes to 
z to be so blessed Education but was cited by medium-sized municipality SC rap what we have chosen 

| Who needs the drastic, both the Consolidation Study instead of two small ones, we aj,d substitute a centralized 
^-expensive changes that Commission and TOWN should be better able not only po Wer authority which they, in 
o consolidation would inevitably TOPICS as representing one to function efficiently within their wisdom, have chosen for 
§ bring' The real costs, efforts, individual's point of view. but also to deal with the us No shred of objectivity 

>- time and problems related to County and the State on such illumines their advocacy 

Smaking us "One" cannot be When Looking lor a Pet . . . things as highways, pollution, publication recently prepared, 

oimagined! To the Editor of Town Topics: flood control, grants-in-aid printed and mailed at our 

Don't let your "only and other matters affecting expense No factual data are 

If we have become one purebred" friends scare you ourinterests. presented to substantiate their 

metropolis from Boston to away from trying a shelter Anyone who is undecided on theory that, in some esoteric 
Washington. DC, why not when selecting a pet. You are the consolidation question fashion, new economies and 
unite with all the surrounding in for a treat adopting through should read the Commission's new efficiencies might evolve. 

townships and become one big the Princeton Small Animal thorough and positive report. 

city? Is that what we really Rescue League (SAVE), an It is most convincing. None of the above is really 

want? immaculate and efficiently- THOMAS P. COOK surprising, since the gist of the 

It is time we all consider the run temporary abode for 7RandomRoad publication was as predictable 

consequences of taking this homeless small animals at 900 as the predisposition of the 

first big step Many com- Herrontown Road (921-6122). RateofGrowthQuestloned. authorship Even the casual 
munities are living in close You won't find a more To theEditor of Town Topics: observer of the socialistic 
proximity in harmony. Why knowledgeable and caring Recently you published a scene is beginning to realize 
can we not continue to do the matchmaker than Mrs. le,ter from Niel Nielsen, a that ni g her cost an( j poorer 
same'' Graves who gives an accurate prominent spokesman for the efficiency go hand in hand 

Vote against consolidation and honest appraisal of the pet g™"P 'avoring consolidation, wjth ^ ° e centralized 
and keep our historic town and under consideration, the that took exception to the governmental control They 
our lovely suburban township report from the veterinarian's prediction that the Township ^g it consolidation and infer 
as is It works exam and all the "how to's" would grow faster than the that you wi u i ose only a little 

RUTHLPLUM youcaretoask Borough in the future He bit of your liberty and vour 

MMurrayPlace And how much is that doggie stated as a "fact" that "The right to be properly 

in the shelter? As much as you Borough will probably have represented 

Report Misinterpreted. want to contribute to SAVE, the faster growth rate in the f „.,, it encroachment ™h t 

To the Editor of Town Topic.: It's a very worthwhile future because of fuel shor- don^want foTos^n iota of 

I would like to use this space organization and you are the tages and the growing at- riBh . , renresentaiinn ai 

for additional coverage of a beneficiary. tractiveness of living closer to "_£ 3, 1 locahzed level I sav 

subject that concerns lis very Try it You'll like it! thecenter of things." W Tthe ^^0 Sen mv 

much. THE LUCAS FAMILY Like many "facts" J™ » their plan to weaken my 

On September 26, TOWN Rocky Hill presented by the group 

TOPICS published an article favoring consolidation, Mr. 

about food inspections by state A Trend Since 1932. Nielsen's fact seems to con- 

and local health authorities. TotheEditorof Town Topics: tradict conditions that exist in „„,„„,„.,,.,„,.„.,„„ „ 
Unfortunately. TOWN In the current debate over 'he Borough and Township. rS'oSnS,. 
TOPICS misinterpreted the whether Princeton is one We are asked to accept his R i„ eovcrnrnen. in ™1 
health inspector's report and I community and should Prediction as a fact ... to . °" IT?™ „' "" ay 
would like to let your readers therefore have one govern- "just take my word that it will n „r anv imnrn » t a 
know the correct facts ment. our past actions speak beso . don't stop to reason it "„„ii„ . _ i . e J- ' 

It was only the bakery at the louder than words In spite of out " £ ,hi ™,™« P ? PT 

Whole Earth Center that was having two governments - a ' „ „',rS ,„ mlleS to 

inspected that day and not the purelv historical accident - Since little or no land is our northeast on the precipice 
whole store Evidence of we have already demon- available for new construction ?' bankruptcy. I know of no 
rodents and roaches was strated the oneness of our of housing in the Borough, how "^nce of any consolidation 
mentioned in the article as community by consolidating can the Borough grow faster 0I municipal governments 
being present but in fact there many of our local government '"an the Township? Con- resulting "> improvement of 
was at no time evidence of functions. versely, how can the Township a "I . 

rodents and roaches on the It began as far back as 1932 fail to grow faster than the Accordingly, why are some 
premises The Whole Earth with the formation of the Joint Borough with the Township People so sure the con- 
Center store has the highest Sewer Operating Committee having so much undeveloped so' 'nation ol Princeton 
rating ("Satisfactory") given Joint Civil Defense-Disaster land available for housing? Borough and Township would 
to food-handling establish- Control was organized in 1943, The only way the Borough 
menu and the Joint Recreation ca n grow faster than the 

Donald Stuart, editor of Board came into being in 1964 Township is through "up- „. 

TOWN TOPICS, has been ward" growth .. through the ?- ast Windsor Township 

most helpful in rectifying this The past decade has brought construction of high rise hav J; . not , heard of , a 
situation and we thank him forth single joint agencies apartment buildings clamoring for consolidation 
verymuch dealing with planning, civil throughout the Borough . . . 

PETER BARUCH rights, public transportation, buildings capable of housing 
President-Manager environmental concerns the hundreds of families "closer 
The Whole Earth Center aging health the public l0 th e center of things." the ,n ^'.governmental functions, 
library and fire protection new, consolidated Town could '"eluding the various boards 
One Man's Opinion. One individual now serves eliminate zoning ordinances an . a . committees. Con- 

To the Editor of Town Topics: both municipalities as the tna t currently prohibit such solvation would pile more 

I would like to emphasize local judge another as the buildings and simultaneously *ork on fewer people who now 
that Win Pikes letter (TOWN municipal attorney and a abolish the rent control or mostlv volunteer their ser- 
TOPICS Oct 3) in the ap- th i r d as tax assessor The d ' n ance to encourage con- "??• 

pendix of the consolidation Borough Housing Authority is struction of such buildings. ra° .- doubt .'„ UDOn con - 

*udy is, as he indeed points also the Township" public Should this happen, I would J**" 1 " " ± ?*» be found 
out. not an official statement housing agency agree with Mr. Nielsen the b y future politicians that we 

by the Board of Education, but since both municipal Borough, thanks to a number wl " need a * 5 °.000 a year 
has personal opinion regarding governments have found it of ten-story apartment mavor wlUl ' he excuse of the 
consolidation and the school sensible to unifv in the buildings, would grow faster time required, not to mention 
system As such, I feel that it ( „ re ' ,* Stances why not than thi Township «5.°<» a year for each 

..unfortunate that it was go the^e fol t^'way and ' certainly hope Mr councilman because of ser- 
mcluded m the consolidation m eTf , e the ew ™1I. Nielsens prediction is not vices rendered Under the 
"?T. at , a !! u funcfions such as engineering based on undisclosed plans the P™ f"' a " an g e T nt We do 

That letter should not be pu b i, c works ^ collection consolidation group may have not have those burdens, nor in 
used as Pro-consolidation ^ n eral administrat'oTand to abolish rent control and the foreseeable future. 
Sl!!. n J l c -i"' 0V . lded by the Pohce' This would eliminate P erm 't the construction of . „_ — — 
Board of Education, since ,t is problems of jurisdiction and high nse apartment buildings read w,th considerable 

merely one person's viewpoint communication and wou"d in the Borough area interest the publication en 




voice. 

ARTHUR B.COE 
115 Shady Brook Lane 



result in any big 
provement? Hightstown is the 
doughnut hole in the middle of 



There is cooperation bet- 

veen both our municipalities 

all governmental functions 



and not that of the Board I, 



provide a single management 



2LET ' 2u.r™^°£ for^e procremenT'an ^"on Avenue 
tt^ are board members who operational facilities and 
are vehemently opposed to equipment 



interest the publii 
JOHN B. MILLER utled " A U n' fied Princeton' 



issued by the Princeton Joint 
Municipal Consolidation Study 
Commission. The garage 



mZ?£SK,L the *£*»? ° nly me ,T e L fe^'-cefonL... 

Board of Education ha. no Z!^ZmZS to"!.? SSJS? """ """£ r °° ted in been witness t0 suc " 
ri»n. >,. tat. » »*.!. i(i *nd appoint officials to ad- traditions we know and Droerams in the nasi r«„i,i„„ 



n, juit a. there ^"IhTs makes ,ense we T^ la ^'f nne , r i' Scorned - mentioned for the central 
[ l l e :..r. eT t U J e Ed' t orofTown r T plc 8 

firmly roo 
idiuons we know and programs in the past resultine 
oTtnTc^^idation it."? rnmister the unified functions revere The two forms of "- 
Hn-~~ a. .h. f ., n K., i« At the verv leasl tni» would government we have 
»^.7»7a. h^ Val « Road Mve *? overhead "I* 1 * « heatedly cholen are 
ESfiJ w5f te ^u*£ng ? a J " la 'n'ng two governing knowledgeable about, and 
aanefltcuttaatconolidauoiL bodie. and the voluminous responsive to, our diverse 
a. uai coiaKmaauon, ftJ)trwork and aaKy ^^ ^ ^ 



in unforeseen over-runL 
resulting in taxpayers footing 
the bills. 
The Township has a shop- 



Daily 10-5 Sunday 11-5 
609) 466-9833 (M9) 468.29,,, 



Bill Starr is Running for 

Princeton Township 

Committee 




Princeton Activities 

* Former Chairman, Joint Princeton Trans- 
portation Committee 

* Former Member, Sfony Brook Regional 
Sewer Authority 

* Board Member & Former Chairman, Prince- 
ton Battlefield Area Preservation Society 

* Member, Board of Trustees, Stony Brook- 
Millstone Watersheds Association 

* Member, Transportation Committee, Mercer- 
Somerset-Middlesex Council 

Professional Background 

* Is an engineer: B.S., University of Maryland 

* Is a lawyer: L.L.B., Catholic University 

* Served in the U.S. Navy for five years 

* Analyzed rate cases for Public Utilities 
Commission, Washington, D.C. 

* Held ke V engineering posts with the Port 
Authority of New York-New Jersey, where 
he was responsible for the rehabilitation of 
Newark Airport ' 

Pa.d lor by the Princeton Township Democratic Campaign 

committee. S Sherman Golomb. Treas . One Palmer.Square. 

Princeton, N J 



Mailbox 

ping center with plenty of free 
parking where Borough 
residents are welcome. Why 
should the Township tax 
payers be saddled with a 
likely big expense to develop 
the business center of the 
Borough? If anybody thinks 
such expansion is going to 
have any influence on people 
using the Quaker Bridge Mall 
they are sadly mistaken. 

The pamphlet goes on and 
on with supposition after 
supposition with no proof for 
any improvement. As a side 
item, not mentioned in the 
publication, I wonder how 
those residing in the Princeton 
University housing project on 
Harrison Street feel about the 
off street parking law of the 
Borough Some of the opinions 
and views expressed in the 
publication would do justice to 
the White House where 
greater wisdom is sorely 
needed. So much for the 
pamphlet. 

The consolidation of the 
Borough and Township school 
districts has been emphasized 
as an example of benefits to be 
derived by joining two public 
bodies, there is no analogy 
between these matters. 
Schools are "productive" 
enterprises, not governing 
organizations. They 
"produce" education by the 
use of facilities and personnel 
such as laboratories, books, 
class rooms, teachers, many 
kinds of equipment, academic 
atmosphere and many ac- 
tivities directly related to 
education. 

A sufficiently large student 
body is necessary in order to 
support qualified personnel 
and facilities. (However, in 
recent years it seems to me 
the little red school house did a 
better job than our big modern 
layouts. At least, the kids 
learned the three Rs.) 

Local government is for the 
sole purpose of public welfare, 
even though some persons on 
occasion seem to forget that 
fact. The smaller the better. It 
is only necessary to have 
sufficient personnel, facilities, 
and equipment to meet that 
responsibility. Consolidation 
will in no way reduce those 
requirements for the simple 
reason there will be no 
reduction in people or area. It 
has been stated that improved 
coordination as the result of 
consolidation of those 
facilities will reduce costs, 
and be more efficient, but no 
figures or programs have 
been submitted to arrive at 
such a conclusion that I have 
seen, just more supposition. 

PAUL S.SMITH 
181 Laurel Circle 

Bigger, Not Better. 

To the Editor of Town Topics : 

Even though the modern 
demand of the 1980s is for 
independence, self- 

determination and com- 
munication, the outmoded 
push of the 1950s is being 
reenacted here in Princeton 
and newcomers are caught in 
the past. 

Take, for instance, the 
slogan that bigger is better. 
Princeton Township is due to 
grow by the five to ten 
thousands in the 1980s. If 
Princeton Junction is even- 
tually included in the one 
Princeton, we would be well 
on the way to a city of fifty or 
sixty thousand. 

The slogan that bigger is 
better is out-of-date. We have 
daily proof of this, beginning 
with big government in 
Washington. It isn't working. 
Internationally we see 
countries like Switzerland 
working well. 

Nationally we see states like 
Rhode Island working well. 
Locally we see Princeton 
Borough and Hopewell 
Borough also functioning well 
It's the developing coun 
txyside which is restless. 



This developing open space Medical Center at Princeton, 
needs to have a voice in its However, without the support 
own development without the of many people, this would not 
burdens of merger or the loss have been possible. We are 
of power deeply grateful to the com- 

The modern trend is to "do munity who contributed so 
it yourself." Interaction generously and to all those 
between independent entities who came to buy. 
is the need of the present, as A special thanks must go to 
expressed by the youth of the host of volunteers who 
today. We need Theatre gave hours of hard work for 
Intime and McCarter, Prin- this worthy project. The ef- 
ceton Borough and Princeton forts of all those who assisted 
Township. us in any way are deeply 

Minorities are essential to appreciated. Our heartfelt 
majorities. Otherwise we slip thanks 
intofaceless bigness. MURIELFRANK 

On November 6, vote for NANCY BOWERS 

balance of power, vote against Chairmen, 

consolidation. Rummage Sale Committee 

MILA GIBBONS GARDNER 

217 Nassau Street Parody (or the Week. 

To the Editor of Town Topics; 

Two Parts of One Community. Instead of going through the 
To the Editor of Town Topics: trauma and expense of con- 

I heartily support con- solidating the two 

solidation of the two Prince- municipalities, why don't we 
tons and I intend to vote ac- get the two newspapers to 
cordingly. This is not a new consolidate? After all, we 
position for me As a Prince- really are a one-newspaper 
ton "old timer" I have been town. 

active in earlier efforts to The two newspapers are 
consolidate. It has always presently serving the same 
seemed a proper thing to me people, covering the same 
and most of the arguments news stories, and selling the 
against it have seemed same advertising to the same 
unimpressive. merchants. Think of the cost 

Efforts to resolve the savings to the rate-payer, the 
consolidation question in subscriber, the owners. We 
terms of tax arithmetic ignore could call it the "Paper of 
the fact that all things change Princeton!" 

and there is no way that any of 

us can forecast with assur- Under the present system of 
ance any advantage or dis- dual newspapers, there is a 
advantage to either township great deal of waste and 
or borough residents with or duplication. Two sets of 
without consolidation. None of publishers, editors, reporters, 
the arithmetic, and none of the secretaries, salespeople and 
projections, have indicated printers, two of every 
any significant differences department! They could 
between them. easily be combined into single 

departments at this time. And 

Forget the sophisticated no one need lose his job! 

arguments and try to explain Also, under the two 
to your children why there are newspaper system, each of the 
two Princetons. Explain to two must now send its own 
them how and why their in- reporter to cover the same 
terests, and those of their events, a needless waste of 
families, are different from man (or woman) power, when 
those of their playmates who a consolidated paper could 
live across the line. send just one reporter to each 

Better yet, try to explain to event, 
your Aunt Minnie who lives in Consider those citizens who 
Ohio that there are two must now go to both news 
Princetons and that there is a offices to hand out handouts, 
reason for this state of affairs, duplicate news releases, 
Tell her why it was necessary wedding announcements, etc. 
to change the boundary to Merchants must deal with two 
provide sites for the hospital sales staffs to place the 
and the high school. identical advertisement, and 

pay for space in each one. 

Get it down to fundamentals Under newspaper con- 
such as these and you will be solidation, this extra time and 
hard pressed to make much cost would be saved. 

sense. It is true that both 

municipalities have their Of course there are some 
various interest groups. It is minor differences between the 
not true that the interest of two papers and we are 
any of these groups is any way sympathetic to their feelings, 
threatened by consolidation, but surely people of good will 
As a matter of fact neigh- on both sides can make it 
borhoods cross the boundary, work. The fact that one 

Consider for example, the newspaper is delivered free 
way "Tree Town" extends out while the other is mailed to 
towards the shopping center subscribers is readily 
with no regard for the line, reconcilable, a small problem 
The Witherspoon section has that might be better handled 
its parts in both munici- in the future, 
palities The Western section A second problem we 
would be hard pressed to recognize is that the small, 
identify any differences tabloid-sized TOWN TOPICS 
between Westcott Road and is located in a charming old 
Edgerstoune Road. historic building in the center 
of urban, downtown Princeton 

Make your own examples. 
There are a great many 
people in all sections who 
could not identify with ac- 
curacy just where the boun- 
dary is. Influences and in- 
terests of the University and 
the many other Princeton 
institutions, large and small, 
extend across the line in all 
directions. 

All of this is by way of 
saying that the two Princetons 
are two parts of a single 
community. Continued in- 
sistance upon a fragile notion 
that two governments are 
necessary or desirable is just 
plain unrealistic. 

JAMES A. ARNOLD, JR 
280 Franklin Avenue 

Rummage Sale Successful 
To the Editor of Town Topics: 
We are very happy to an- 
nounce that we have had 
another successful Rummage 
Sale for the benefit of the 



Borough, while the larger (in 
size) paper has chosen to 
locate in a new, modern 
building on its own open space 
in the Township 

But even with these 
acknowledged differences, 
their public image is the 
same. Most people don't see 
any real differences. We 
really are a one-newspaper 
town, they say. 

The only people who might 
object to this eminently fair 
merger might be a couple of 
old-fashioned publishers 
(although in principle they 
both approve of some forms of 
consolidation.) The rest of the 
nice folks of both newspapers i 
would love to consolidate 1 
because "it makes sense," 
and we are all friends and 
neighbors anyway, working 
together for one newspaper. 
They are tired of having 
people say "Which paper do 
you work for?" and "I never 
can remember what I read in 
which paper!" It's so con- 
fusing. One newspaper would 
solve this serious problem of 
identity. 

The debts and assets of the 
two publications aren't 
exactly equal, but that 's not of 
much importance in a con- 
solidation which otherwise 
offers so much to so many at 
the expense of so few, really. 

Of course the consolidated 
newspaper would have to send 
everybody two copies of the 
new "Paper" to keep up the 
circulation figures. But we'd 
only have to read one. Think of 
the time that would save. 

Our committee thinks that 
this is an idea whose time has 
come. 

ORREN J ACK TURNER 
39 Hamilton Avenue 

Editor's Note: Mr. Turner 
signed the letter as "chairman 
of the Newspaper Con- 
solidation Committee." 



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EDITH'S 

30 Nassau Street 921-6059 




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1st Left Over the Bridge 
Princeton-Hightstown Rd. 

609-799-0530 



BUSINESS 

In Princeton 



i Weekly Stock Quotations of Area Firms | 



Low 

Applied Data Research i » ' . 

Atlas Corp 15^ 

Gulton Industries ■ ." - 

Lenox 26S, 

United Jersey Banks 11 

E.G.&G. Inc 36% 

Squibb 34'* 

Bid 

Base 10 T% 

Circle F Industries 5*-4 

Dalaram 28^ 

Heritage Bancorp 15'^ 

Horizon Bancorp 14 

Malhematica 6 

Metromalion % 

N.J. National Corporation 21^ 

Princeton Chemical Research ¥4 

Princeton Klectronics % 





Previous Monday 


High 


Low 


High 


11 


11% 


11% 


1«% 


15% 


16 


13 


12 


12% 


27 


28 


28% 


11% 


11% 


12 


3»4 


37% 


38% 


34% 


35 


35% 


Aiked 


Bid 


Asked 


8% 


8% 


»% 


6*4 


5% 


6% 




26'/4 


27% 


16 


15% 


16% 


14% 


14% 


15% 



'» 



SALE CONFIRMED? 
Sfceehan Question In Court. 
• The sheriff's sale of the un- 
; finished Sheehan building at 

Nassau and Markham, will be 

confirmed this Friday unless 

Timothy J Sheehan. prinicpal 

in the 146 Dundas Corporation 

which formerly owned the 

building, produces (400,000 by 

9a.m. 
Without that sum at that 

hour and date. Superior Court , 

will confirm the sale, andj I 

dismiss Mr. Sheehan's request 
j to the court asking that the 

sale be set aside. 
It is reported that Pulaski 

Savings and Loan of South 

River, awarded ownership of 
! the building in a foreclosure 

action, already has a buyer (or *)m^>mfja*m*>a&>»^>aK)mL)^>m.<>mK>m^>x<>&^yMxytt •*&**< 

the structure. Officials at the , escue plan ," Mi n H jjj Mews the living-room from a Mill Hill is at the end of 

savings and loan insitution wi n cons j st f 100 con- balcony and skylights. Jackson Street, behind the old 

would neither confirm nor dominium units of about 1,200 Van Sciver store building on 

quare feet each on land The only outside space will Broad Street. The develop 



l recommendation pro c 



Prlco Quotations Only— not to be construed a 

Prices Provided by Princeton Office of Tucker, Anthony & R.L Day 



deny. 



remaining after Trenton be an entry court of 10 by 12 ment is reached from the 
GROUNDBREAKING SET cleared the area of feet. Parking will be limited to Market Street exit of the 
For KM Light Project, dilapidated buildings. onecar. freeway. 

Gl ^i r ^f -L C . erem ?r^ Houses in "* first 36 units Miu Hi » Mews Associates 

will be held in Trenton at 11:30 will sell in the $55,000 to $65,000 Inc is a Dartnershin cnn 

am Friday, October 19, for Most apartments will be rarge . Buyers will probably sjsting of a Far HHs ar 

MiU Hill Mews, the privately only 13 feet wide. A typical be people employed in chitectural firm a law fi™ 

financed, middle-income town two-bedroom unit will have a downtown Trenton, according an engineering ZZ 

house project in which the carport under the main living t0 the Light firm, although construction managers and 

Karl M Light Real Estate levels, the second bedroom there has been considerable the Light real «ta?e firm 

firm is a partner and bath partly below grade, a inlere st from Princeton g ™ 

Described as "an urban den with fireplace overlooking residents. continued on p«g e i« 



LOMBARDO and HILL: 

We Care About All The People 




How Accessible is Borough Hall? 

We Propose: 

• A ramp up the steps for the handicapped 

• Better lighting in the parking area 

• A reserved parking space in front of Borough Hall for the handicapped 

Vote Democratic November 6th 

Re-Elect MARTIN P. LOMBARDO to Borough Council 
Elect BARBARA J. HILL to Borough Council 
Elect ROBERT D. McCHESNEY for Mayor 



'-rR BIlSS. T 



38 Hawthorne Si . Princeton 




Nassau 



<35>lF0RD 



« 



See Th 




Lincoln Continental 

Route 206 at Ch 




Mercury Monarch 



i-Conover Motor Company 

proudly presents the 

11GHTY EIGHTIES" I Sl 

em On Display Friday, October 12 




crry Valley Road, Princeton, N. J. • 921-6400 




5 Busiiirss in Prwu&on 



- HONOR AWARD WON 

o" By Short and Ford 
s Renovation 

« Massachusetts vacation homi 
2 belonging to Seward andj 
g Joyce Johnson Jr. of Prin- 

. ceton has won for architects 
< Short and Ford the First 
g Honor Award in an American 
J! Institute of Architects com- 
g petition The award was 
j sponsored by the Red Cedar 

• Siingle and Hand Split Shake 
z Bureau of the A1A. 
z Citing the renovation of the 
P. shingle and shake structure as 
u "a skillful handling of an old 
z building." the Award said of 
g Short and Ford's work, "The 
w - strongest quality is a respect 
o for the existing fabric of the 
g old house, and the thoughtful 
I- restoration of the exterior 
| New additions relate to the old 
o forms in a sensitive manner." — 
*• Last year the same project CRAFT FAIR CHAIRMEN: Chairmen of the third annual Craft Fair which will be 
a First Honor Award in held Oct. 26-27 at the Pennington Methodist Church include, from left, Mrs 



Mr. Trowbridge is a Princeton High School, 
managing director of Foun- Princeton Day School, the Hun 
dation Managers Inc. on School and Stuart Country 
Chambers Street and a Day School are all involved, as 
resident of Hun Road. Before is the Princeton Hunger 
coming to Princeton, he was Project, a community-side 
adviser to the president of the organization. The Jaycees will 
Inter-American Foundation in provide organizational 
Washington, DC, the largest assistance on the day of the 
governmental agency in Latin walk by manning the check- 
America. He also served for 15 points. 

years with the Ford Foun- 

dation as head of regional Nine religious 
offices in Peru, Equador and organizations, including the 
Bolivia Jewish Center of Princeton 
and most of the Protestant 

A 1960 graduate of Yale churches are participating, 
University who earned an Mr. Grove reports, as are 
MA. from the University of Princeton University and 
Chicago in 1967, Mr. Princeton Seminary. In ad- 
Trowbridge was assistant dition, efforts are being made 
director for Vietnam refugee to solicit participation from 
relief in Hong Kong under the businesses and industry. A 
auspices of the Presbyterian committee of 20, the largest 
Church right after college. ever, is planning the event. 

The Walk will include 

joggers and runners as well as 

CROP WALK DATBSET wa i ke rs. The 10-mile route 

To Be Held October 21. w in begin and end in Palmer 
Princeton will hold its annual square, and instead of 
CROP Walk for Hunger on heading out into the country as 



won a nrsi Honor Awara in neia uct. to-ti ai ino rannMiyiuii ™ii»»»i »,,,....... ,,.„._--, ■-■ ■ ; Snnriav Orinhpr ?i at l The — . — Ti j •. 

the AIA's Homes for Better Marjorie Mertz, chairman of the stitch V sew booth; Mrs. Ruth Bruce, chairman of „ ^ ds ° c o nL Walk are la f i' ear ;. wl11 wend ' ts wa y . 

Uvu^awardsprogram Short ..Nature's Corner"; Mrs. Barbara Newell, genera, chairman, and Mrs. Betty Ann P££*J »Mte Walk are , h . d 

located on Hartel, Chnstmas booth chairman^ _ fund raisi ^ educational Z S^ X Campus * 



and Ford 

Mapleton Road, off Route 

One. in Plainsboro. 




RELIGION 
In Princeton 



October 26 from 7 to 9 and on sermons on the Gospel of arm of Church World Service, 

Saturday, October 27, from 10 Mark, the first entitled "The and . °. ther religious j^g idea benind ^e Walk is 
MorrellHall. Beginning of the Gospel of organizations to disaster for runners and wa lkers to 



Chairman Barbara Newell Jesus Christ." The public L 

announced that this year's fair invited. 

will feature a number of new 

booths: baked and canned LATIN AMERICA TOPIC 

goods; fancy foods of unusual of Forum Talk. "The Role 

homemade condiments as of the Christian Leader in 
America" will be the 



WILSON GRANDSON DUE 
At University Chapel. The weM as old cool( books and Lat 



stricken areas around the obtain pledges of so much per 

world and to self-help mile from as many people ^ 

programs in underdeveloped possible and then , after the 

countries. Walk t0 coUect me pledges 

and hand in the proceeds to 

According to Terry Grove ' he CR0P representative. The 

' donor may specify that a 



At University Chapel. The «*" as °' u cook uooasana Latin America" will be the New Jereevd rector of PRrip' donor ma y s P eclf y 
Very Rev. Francis B Sayre recipes and an antique booth topic of a talk by James rh i« tear', w it 'ii h pledge go to one of the 
Jr., grandson of Woodrow of glass, china and collec- Trowbridge Sunday at 10: 15 at h "'lZ ■,„.„, llV hi ti, 3 religious organization: 



Wilson, will preach in the tibles 
Princeton University Chapel 

Sunday at 11 For his sermon, Bac i( aga j n w jh be the 

Dean Sayre will use a sub- chnstmas booth with a large 

stanbal portion of his gran- selection of tree ornaments 

dfather s baccalaureate and decorations. Nature's 

sermon to the Princeton corner will offer dried flowers, 

graduating class of 1905. The both traditional and unique 

service is one of the many and pine cone articles; stitch 

events at the university •„ sew with a wide selection of 

celebrating the centennial of handmade articles for every 

Wilson s graduation from memb er of the family and 

what was then called the Living Things .. g reen plants 
College of New Jersey. 



bigger event than before. The 
ondary schools 



various 
ligious organizations aiding 
world hunger. Undesignated 



Joseph O'Neill 



SPECIAL SERVICE SET 
By Christ Church. Christ 
hich 



Dean Sayre, born in 1915, 
GRANT AWARDED was the , firsl grandchild of 

To Write Manual. The Ford , E , lle " Axson „ , Wllson and 
Foundation has awarded the Woodrow Wilson. Dean 

rw.rm,™. nf Small Private Sayre s mother was Jess e Church of Princeton 

Co»e«s a Bran? of tSsTs Woodrow Wilson Sayre; his regularly meets tl ™, 

Joseoh P O'Nel is the '"her was Francis Bowes Boychoir School on Lambert 

Conference's executive Sa V re . who had a lon g and Drive, will hold services this 

director « e <- u " v < ; distinguished career in the Sunday, Visitor's Sunday, in 

The grant is for the com- Public service. Dean Sayre Bristol Chapel, Westminster 

nnciKrJ , nf a manual in onirta was Dean of Washington Lhoir College. 

Sol e« alimSrators who Cathedral from 1951 to 1978 Sunday School, from 9:30 to 

a^e faced iTtheDroWemso? and has recently been 10:30. includes a Bible survey 

mercer aco^sUion ? or Associate Director of the series for adults and youth 

S«ing of the'? coHege": WUh w «odrow Wilson International taught by Princeton Seminary 

ihaa«Wi«frtarlinpincnllM>e Center for Scholars in student Bart Ehrman. 

.7rnH>nVnt< in th. ?«?. Washington. Children's church school takes 

enro ments in the 1980s, ,„ ,° ,.,.. ... «i Q „a a » .i,« Pnnn »;«,„ j 

manv colleees will have to Woodrow Wilson, while P'ace at the same time, and a 

adoo a ^ new corporate stilus P™"* 5 " at ^ Pr«ident of nursery is provided. Coffee, 

m Trder to cOnTmue servme Princeton University, tea and cake are served at a 

the public Mr O'Neill said preached many times in the fellowship hour between 

^eTanuarwilYhe'pthem then M a rq uand Chapel. Some servcesfrom 10:30toll. 

w,th the legal, financial and S»j£S*lJS— Jfi * ,™Z ^TlL^Zt 
human problems involved 



sung during the service on directed by Forrest G. Hen- 
derson will take part in the 
worship service at 11. The 
Rev. Kenneth A. Smith will 
begin a series of expositional 



October 14 

The grant will provide EVANGELIST TO SPEAK 
funding to publish and At Nassau Christian Center, 
distribute the study's findings Dr CM. Ward, Chancellor of 
to a wider audience of those Bethany Bible College, Santa 
who are concerned with Cruz, Calif , will be at the 
higher education both in the Nassau Christian Center this 
Congress, and in federal and weekend for a four-day 
state agencies. The Con- speaking engagement on 
ference of Small Private "spiritual renewal " 
Colleges, whose offices are He will be heard Thursday, 
located at 145 Witherspoon Friday and Saturday evenings 
Street, has a membership of 94 at 7 : 30 and on Sunday at 10 : 30 
colleges and universities and 6:30 The services will be 
around the country. held at the Center, 26 Nassau 
Street 



TO DESIGN OFFICE 
For Millipore Subsidiary. 
The Princeton architectural 
firm of E Harvey Myers has vZ^m^JZ* 3%™ 

i .i—. j ../_;-.. ....- Methodist Church of Pen 

nington will hold its third 



CRAFTFAIRSET 
By Pennington Methodist 
Church. The First Ut 



been selected to design 
story office addition in 
Freehold Township for 
gton Diagnostic, a 
subsidary of the Millipore 
Corporation Energy con- 
servation and handicapped 
accessibility techniques will 
be incorporated into the 
project 

The 14.000 square foot ad- 
dition will include an entrance 
and lobby, visitors entrance, 
board meeting room and the 



annual Craft Fair on Friday, 



CREATIVE DRAPERIES 

Upholstering 
Slipcovers 

'5 Man St Kmgston 
9213569 201-828-7144 



The 

KIMBLE 

FUNERAL HOME 



Edwin L Kimble 
R Birchali Kimble 
Claude M Crater 



A Princeton Family 

Owned and Operated 

Funeral Home 

Since J 923 




fix up, warm up, dress up 

with a 

Nassau Savings remodeling loan. 

Now is the time to considei insulating your home, adding a fireplace 
room or garage. It is also a good lime to think ol painting or just plain 
lixing up An economical Nassau Savings Home Improvement Loan 
makes it possible lo add comlort and value to your home in a truly 
trinity way Visit any ol our three convenient offices and discuss your 
plans with us We'll be pleased to help make your plans a reality- 
auickly and courteously 




Religion in Princeton 



amounts will be channeled 
through CROP to Church 
World Service programs: 

Those who are interested in 
walking, running or jogging to 
help the hungry may call 
Margaret L'Huillier, 924-8028 
or Richard Alson, 921-3717, for 
more information and for 
sponsor envelopes. Last 
year's CROP Walk raised 
$7,336. 

BULLETIN NOTES 

The Princeton United 
Methodist Church will observe 
Laity Day Sunday at the 11 
worship service. The theme, 
"God's People: Called to 
Witness," will be affirmed by 
the participation of the laity in 
the worship service. 

The morning dialogue 
sermon will be given by Mrs. 
Beverly Beggs, Chairman of 
the Church Board; Mrs. 
Eunice Freeman, a native of 
South Africa; Dr Paul 
Houston, Superintendent of 
the Princeton Regional School 
System; and Dr. Andrew 
Shelpuk, chairman of the 
church membership com- 



mittee The dialogue theme 
will be "Witness, The 
Relationship of my Work to 
my Christian Faith 

Laity Sunday is observed 
throughout the United 
Methodist Church to em- 
phasize the fact that all 
believers have equal 
responsibility to be Christ's 
people. 

Temple Beth Chaim and 
Temple Beth El have agreed 
to sponsor a new group called 
the Jewish Singles of the 
Windsors in order to provide 
more of a service to the 
singles community age 28 and 
over. There will be house 
parties, dinners, trips, pic- 
nics, and dances. Two such 
functions are anticipated each 
month, in addition to the 
regular Third Thursday 
Singles Rap Session. 

The group is also working on 
new ideas for the Thursday 
meetings, such as guest 
speakers and workshops, as 
well as more rap groups. The 
next monthly rap session will 
be on Thursday, October 18, at 
8 at Congregation Beth Chaim, 
Village Road and Old Trenton 
Road, Route 535, West Win- 
dsor. The cost will be $2 per 



Covenant Presbyterian 
Church, Parkway and 
Parkside Avenues, Trenton, 
will hold its third annual 
Oktoberfest Bazaar Saturday 
from 10 to 4. 

Among the items for sale 
will be handcrafted goods, 
home canned goods, baked 
goods, candy, plants, jewelry, 
nearly-new items, holiday 
decorations, books and 
records, toys and games, and 
ice skates. There will also be a 
car wash. Lunch will be 
served and children's en- 
tertainment provided. 

The Catholic Daughters will 
hold their Fall Rummage Sale 
on Thursday and Friday, 
October 11 and 12, from 9 to 4 
at 16 Park Place The $1 a bag 
will start on Friday at 1. 

Trinity Church, 33 Mercer 
Street, will hold an art auction 
benefit on Friday, October 19, 
at 8:15 in the parish hall. The 
sale will be a collection of 
original works in many media 
by name artists. There will be 
door prizes and refreshments. 
General admission is $2.50. 



The Rev. George A. 
Chauncey, executive, 
Washington Communication 
Office, Presbyterian Church 
in the U.S. and chairman. 
Interreligious taskforce on 
US Food Policy, will be the 
guest preacher Sunday at 10 at 
the Nassau Presbyterian 
Church. 

Twenty-three Protestant, 
Roman Catholic, Jewish and 
ecumenical agencies 
cooperate in the Washington- 
based Interreligious Task- 
force to influence U.S. policy 
for justice for the hungry at 
home and abroad. 



The Rev. Dr. James I. 
McCord, president of Prin- 
ceton Theological Seminary 
and president of the World 
Alliance of Reformed Chur- 
ches, was one of eight leading 
non-Catholic American 
churchmen who prayed last 
Sunday with Pope John Paul 
II in an historic ecumenical 
service in Notre Dame Chapel 
of Trinity College, 

Washington, DC. 

The First Baptist Church at 

John and Paul Robeson Place. 
will have a revival October 22- 



26. The Rev. Willie J. Sanders 
of the Friendship Baptist 
Church. Trenton, will be guest 
Evangelist The theme for the 
week will be "Seeking the 
better way. through Christ " 

The Rev. Dr. John M. 
Mulder, Assistant Professor of 
American Church History at 
Princeton Theological 
Seminary, will speak on "The 
Phenomenon of Mission" on 
Wednesday, October 17, at 
6:30 in the seminary's Campus 
Center Auditorium. 

Discussion will follow. 

The event is the first in a 
series of lecture-seminars 
sponsored by the International 
Students Association and is 
open to the public. 

Dr Mulder, a graduate of 
Hope College, Princeton 
Seminary and Princeton 
University, was assistant 
editor of the papers of 
Woodrow Wilson. Since 1969 he 
has been assistant editor of 
"Theology Today." 

The Grlggstown Reformed 
Church, Canal Road, will hold 
its fall rummage sale Friday 
from 9 to 8. The $1 a bag sale 
will be from 3 to closing time. 

Items for the sale may be 



delivered to the church hall ; 
Wednesday and Thursday , 
between 9 and 1 or in the - 
evening between 7 and 9. For < 
pick-up call Carol Webster, : 
359-7554, or Sue Nilsen, 359- ; 
3728 

( 

The traditional Blessing of '• 
Animals in commemoration of \ 
St. Francis of Assisi will take < 
place at Trinity Church on '. 
Saturday at 5:30. Those who ! 
wish to have animals blessed i 
should bring them to the circle i 
in front of the church at 33 ; 
Mercer Street. The Blessing ! 
will be followed by the usual \ 
Vigil Eucharist of Sunday. 


Bill Walch, chairman of the '■ 
stewardship program at i 
Prince of Peace Lutheran < 
Church will lead a series of < 
four classes in the adult r 
Sunday School class during I 
October. The programs will f 
focus on the three aspects of Z 
stewarsdhip, time, talent and 1 
money and their relationship 
to each other. The class will 
begin each Sunday at 9:45. 

The church is located on 
i in 'I ii -.1 in it Road in Princeton 
Junction, the pastor is the 
Rev. Frederick Schott, 799- 
1753 or 799-1783. 



□ f=lGE 



]Bt= 



3 01 



)QE 



3QC 



3Q[ 



DIRECTORY OF RELIGIOUS SERVICES 



CHRISTIAN CENTER 
OF PRINCETON 



223 North Harrison Street 



Sunday Worship 
Sunday School 
Wednesday Prayer 
Thursday Teaching and Prayer 



and 6:30 p.r 
9:45 a.r 
7:30 p.i 
7:30 p.i 



The Rev Basil W. Coward, Pastor 
466-0546 



Q Princeton Baptist 
Church 

at Penn's Neck 
Washington Rd . . US 1 

Church School 9 45 a m 

I Nursery Care) 

Morning Service 1 1 a.m. 

Sunday School 10 a.m. 

Wednesday Bible Study 7 p.r 

Daniel B. England. Pastor 



QUAKER MEETING 
FOR WORSHIP 

Slony Brock Meetinghouse 

Quaker Road 

For information 

call Arthur Manuel 

452-2824 

Meeting for Worship 

9 30 and 1 1 a m. 
each First Day 



FIRST BAPTIST 
CHURCH 



Sunday Worship 11 i 
Church School 9:45 a 



FIRST 

PRESBYTERIAN 

CHURCH 

of DulchNeck 

54 So. Mill Rd (at Village Rdl 

Princeton Jet 799-0712 

Kenneth Blaine Cragg 
Pastor 

Identical 
Worship Services 

9:30 and 1 1 a.m. Sunday 
Church School 9:30 a.m. 
Youth Fellowship 6 p.m. 



First Church of Christ, Scientist 

1 6 Bayard Lane, Princeton 

Sunday Service II a.m. and 7:30 p.m. 

Sunday School II a.m. 

Child Care Available 

EDNESDAY EVENING TESTIMONY MEETING 8 15 p.i 

Visitors Welcome 



Weekdays, 9 :30a.m. to5p.m 
Wednesday to 7 : 45 p. m . 



Q Westerly Road Church 




Sunday School 9 45 a.m.. Morning Worship 8 and 11 i 
iingWorship6:30p.m 
Prayer Meeting. Wednesday 7:30pm 

Phone 924-3816 



Rev Edward H. Morgan. Pastor 

=i q ■ ' □ r=]or= 



* 




Princeton 

United Methodist 

Church 

Nassau and Vandeventer Sts 
Sunday Worship 11a.m. 
Church School 11a.m. 
Jack Johnson, Minister 

Church Office, 924-2613 



Witherspoon St. Presbyterian Church 

Withers poon and Quarry Streets 
Sunday Worship, 10:30a.m. (Nursery Available! 



Trinity 

Episcopal 

Church 



H C. (1st, 3rd & 5th Sun I 
10:30a.m. 

MP (other Sundays) 
Rev. Samuel Ishibashi 



Unitarian Church 
of Princeton 

Chtrry Hi mi State tads 

Sunday Schedule 

Worship Service 10 a.m. 

Religious Education 10a rc 

Child Care 10a m. 
Dr. Edward A .Fn*l. 




Congregation BETH CHAIM 

Village Road, West Windsor 

799-9401 

Friday Evenings, 8:30 p m. 

Saturday Mornings, 1 30 a m 

REFORM JEWISH CONGREGATION 

Rabbi Eric B. Wisnia 



St. Paul's Catholic Church 

214 Nassau Street, Princeton 



Saturday Vigil Mass: 5:30and7:30 
Sunday: 7 00.8:30, 10:00, 11:30 and5 00p r 




The Presbyterian Church 
of Lawrencevllle 

He. NJ Es/atJ r690 

Sunday Schedula 

Worship Service 1 a m 

Church School 10 am 

Inlani and Child Care Available 

Oana Fearon III, Minister 896-1212 



'The Bible Our 
Only Creed" 



+ Princeton 



felt of Christ 



DE 



3Q 



DE 



3EK 



IDS 



NASSAU CHRISTIAN CENTER 

Nassau & Chambers Streets 
P O Box 92 
Princeton, New Jersey 
Renewal broadcast on station WHWH, 1 350 AM 8 00 A M 

Sunday Worship 1 30 A M and 6 30 P M 

Thursday Bible Sludy & Prayer 7 30 P M 

Friday lacob -.Well Cotiee House 800PM 

i/l II'IHI 

452-2828 

"The Church That Cares And Shares" 



BUNKER HILL LUTHERAN CHURCH 

Griggstown. New Jersey 

Pastor Robert M. Sletta 

Telephone 359-6302 

Sunday: 9:30 AM Sunday School 

1 1 : 00 AM Morning Worship Service 
7:00 PM F.vi'iung (.nspel Service 



Wednesday: 7:30PM I. ihle Study and Prayer Meeting 



CHRIST CONGREGATION 

Walnut La & Houghton Rd 

Worship 4 Sludy 10a m 

Margot Trusty Pickett A\ ^ 

MarkH Pickett ^SFt 

Co- pastors 




THE JEWISH CENTER 

Princeton, N.J. 
435 Nassau St. 9210100 

—A Congregation Blending Tradition with Contemporary Meaning- 
Weekly Sabbath Services, Adult Education 
Religious School and Youth Program 
Rabbi Melvln Jay Glatt 



CHRIST CHURCH of PRINCETON 

P. O. Box 3003 Princeton , New Jersey 08540 
609- 971 -1020 



Meeting a 



^^^2m 



4 S Sunday School (also aduli class) 

00 Morning Worship Service 

30 Evening Service (leaching and soi 

Nursery Provided 

Kenneth A. Smith. Pastor 



LUTHERAN CHURCH OF THE MESSIAH 

Nassau Street and Cedar Lane 

407 Nassau St., Princeton 

924-3642 

The Rav. Allan A. Gartner. Pallor 

Services al 8 and 1 30 a m 

Sunday at 9 a.m. 
Bible Classes at 9 15a m 



3DC 



33 River Road 924-2J 

Bible Classes -10:00 a.m. 

Worship Services -11:00 a.m. & 6:30 p. m 

llll Mil . Illl 



irai.TTiT.nii 



Trinity Church 

33 Mercer St., Princeton. 924-2277 

The Rev. John Crocker Jr.. Hector 

Saturday 5 30 p m Sunday Vigil Eucharist 

Sunday Services 8am Holy Euchanst 

9 15am Family Euchanst and Church School 

11 15am Holy Eucharist • 1 St, 3rd & 5th Sundays 

Mommg Prayer & Sermon - 2nd & 4(h Sundays 

(child cart available) 



^% . . ■ '■>/ - 

\%. w\) Ann NUCLEAR MEETINOI trie net 
ation it to Mercer SEA Alliance (Safe Energ 




P8I hi&mpi SiHMt ran 

REDDING'S 

PLUMBING and HEATING 
924-0166 



AIR 

CONDITIONING 



APPLIANCES 



234 NASSAU STREET 
PRINCETON. NEW JERSEY 08540 



TOWNHOUSE 



NEED A BABYSITTE 


7 comclen 


IIMII 


mother Is oH.rinj d. 


jerM.OI., 1 




lnl.nnw.lcom. pi.. 


ecall«53 8 


"3,, 


■jKSLS«S£ 


r OUITA 


"'*„ 


jj£ IK «n 




397 



SAVE OUR MOST PRECIOUS 
POSSESSION ENERGY 

Buy a Coventry Court Townhouse 




Gas supplied heat, A/C, hot water, cooking 
Heatalator fireplace, Thermo-pane windows - no 
storms needed, Vapor barrier & insulation under 
flooring, Fully insulated throughout, Within walking 
distance to shops, restaurants, buses, schools, 
Low maintenance - Beginning at $62,500 with 
financing available to qualified buyers 

Can be shown 9-9 Mon. thru Fri., Sat. & Sun. 'til 
5:00 thru E. J. Lelie Agency, 41 Bridge St., 
Lambertville, N.J. 397-1700 



Princeton Real Estate Group 
Multiple Listing Service 



LIGHT 



Karl Light • Brokers • Pat Light 
Realtors 247 Nassau St. (609) 924-3822 




SALES ASSOCIATES 

Constance Brauer Janet Matteson 

John Cartwright Stuart Minton 

Marcy Crimmins Braxton Preston 

Cornelia Dielhenn Nancy Scott 

Lawrenceville Marge Dwyer 

Specialists Gladys Wright 




"THE TREE HOUSE" 

High on a hill with eye-level view of tall trees, this 
dramatic contemporary gives the feeling of living 
in a tree house Striking 2 story living room, 
spacious dining area, super kitchen with pretty 
breakfast area opening to a deck, 4 good 
bedrooms, family room, den, 3Vz baths - extras 
galore including central and solar assisted heat 
and hot water $240,000 







iW*WM*WI>.l»iil«»(WWiwuiMH.ni,+w 
WE SHOW THE HOUSE 

"e trees! This roomy 5 bedroom, 2Vz bath 
split level is on a particularly lovely 
. : ot. almost an acre, backing up to a 
A perfect home for a large family, and in 
:. jiar Littlebrook school district Family 
■■//■ «ith fireplace, pretty deck off the dining 
and so many trees it is hard to see the 
e New on the market, with oc- 
cupancy tor the New Year Ottered at $167,500 



1 740 AND ALL THAT GOES WITH IT 

This delightful 18th century colonial with a 20th 
century addition has been kept in nice condition 
without losing the charm of its period. Entrance 
hall, large living room with original fireplace 
mantel, charming dining room, small 1st floor 
bedroom and bath. Upstairs, 3 bedrooms of 
varying sizes, including spacious master suite, 2 
baths. Old barn-garage, gorgeous plantings, 
handsome trees and a walk to town Princeton 
location. | 

Asking $185,000 

Extra lot available 

LOTS -LOTS 

HEAVILY WOODED 2 acre lot on Stuart Road 
city sewer and water Perfect (or a contemporary 
home $80,000 

One and a half acre lot, Atumn Hill area Newly 
subdivided Offered at $65,000 

WEST WINDSOR 

We are pleased to offer a most attractive acre lot - 
nicely wooded, and with a stream Convenient 
Grover s Mill location with new sewer in the street, 
hookups scheduled for 1980 Buy now. get your 
plans in order, and plan to start building next year 
$20,000 



PRINCETON BOROUGH COLONIAL 

Location, size and condition are the notable assets 
of this pretty, freshly painted Colonial, tucked 
away on a peaceful Borough street. Large living 
room with fireplace, dining ell, pleasant kitchen, 
study. 3 sunny corner bedrooms and 1 Vz baths 
provide just the amount of living space lots of 
people are looking for these days. In addition, the 
house is attractive, beautifully built, and comes 
complete with stove, refrigerator, washer and 
drver! $139,500 




PRINCETON TOWNSHIP CAPE COD 

How often can you find a 3 bedroom, 2 bath house 
in a nice Princeton area at this price? Living room, 
dining area, kitchen, bedroom, study, and bath are 
on the first floor; 2 bedrooms and bath on the 
second. Mature landscaping on a nice lot backed 
by woods Some tender loving care is needed, but 
if it weren't, the price would be considerably 
higher. $92,500 



Z>ke Vreafure urove 
4-6Hullish 



bath a. 
924-7254 



■ THE POTTERY 

barn 



The Marketplace/Pfi 



HINT 

MTN 

SPORTS 

ROUTE 1 

^WRENCEVIULE 



FORER PHARMACY 

1 60 Wltherspoon St. 

Pharmaceuticals 
Orthopedic Supplies 

921-7287 



NOTICE 

All real estate ad- 
vertised in TOWN 
TOPICS is subject to the 
Federal Fair Housing Act 
of 1968 which makes it 
illegal to advertise "any 
preference, limitation or 
discrimination based on 
race, color, religion or 
national origin, or an 
intention to make any 
such preference, limita- 
tion or discr imi nation 

TOWN TOPICS will not 
knowingly accept any 
advertising for real 
.estate which is in 
violation of the law Our 
readers are hereby in- 
formed that all dwellings 
advertised in this 
newspaper are available 
on an equal opportunity 
basis. 



/ 



ANNUAL RABIES 
VACCINATION CLINIC 

Sponsored By 
PRINCETON BOROUGH 

AND 
PRINCETON TOWNSHIP 

Thursday, October 11,1 979 

3:00 PM to 6:00 PM 

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 1 3, 1 979 

9:00 AM to 12 NOON 

LOCATION COMMUNITY PARK 

POOL COMPLEX 

Three (3) year immunity will be received by all 
dogs receiving vaccine, with the exception of 
dogs under 11 months of age who will need 
vaccinations again next year to confer proper 
immunity. 

ALSO ALL DOGS MUST BE LEASHED AND 
ACCOMPANIED BY A PERSON CAPABLE 
OF PROPERLY HANDLING THE ANIMAL. 

Patrick Hanson 
Health Officer 



PEYTON 

ASSOCIATES 

246 NASSAU STREET PRINCETON NEW JERSEY 

REALTORS 609-921-1550 




SET AMONG SOFT PATCHES OF SUNLIGHT ON A WOODED 

velvet lawn this unusually attractive and Ideally located Princeton 
residence has large rooms and most attractive details (for 
example, an 18th Century mantle at the living room fireplace). In 
addition to the spacious living room, there Is a formal dining 
room, attractive kitchen with a breakfast bay overlooking the 
attractive grounds, a large stone floored screen porch with 
fireplace, panelled family room, 3 spacious bedrooms, 2</2 baths, 
Ideal office or hobby space, plenty of storage and a large 2-car 
garage. The space and the plan are most attractive and the price 
tempting at $165,000 



OFFICE SPACE 
RESEARCH PARK 



1 101 Sute Rend. Princwoo. N.J. 



$3.50 per square foot net, net 
Areas up to 30,000 square feet 

427, 000 square feet in Park 
Occupied by approximately 50 Tenants 

Princeton Mailing Address 
and Phone Number 

CALL: Research Park 
609-924-6551 




THIS IS SIMPLY AN INKLING OF WHAT THIS LOVELY 
LISTING NEAR THE INSTITUTE HAS TO OFFERI Pictured 
above is the contemporary addition by Wm. Thompson AIA 
with lots of indirect lighting and access to the yard-patlo. 
This all comes with a comfortable living fireplace, equal- 
sized dining room, practical kitchen, four bedrooms and two 
full baths. There's also an apartment possibility with full 
bath on the lower level. Panelled room with bunk beds Is a 
highlight down there! Come see for yourself. All within 
walking distance to Sprlngdale, McCarter, the Dinky and 
lots more. 

$209,0001 

JOHNT 

CHENDERSON 

REALTORS VJ 

4 Charlton Street, Princeton. N.J. 08540 • (609) 921-2776 



100 USED STEEL 
FILING CABINETS 

4 drawer LETTER SIZE '65 

5 drawer LETTER SIZE '75 

CASH AND CARRY 

STATE SALES OFFICE EQUIPMENT 

694 S. Broad St., Trenton, N.J. 
392-5166 

OPEN DAILY S SA TURDA Y 



UPTOWN PARKING 

Two Nassau St. Princeton, N.J. 

$40 

Inside or Outside Reserved 
Parking Spaces 

Convenient location 
Call:. 24-Hour parking 



mdduuit 



Restaurant, Inc. 
921-3849 



Antiques-Nice Household-Coins-Power Tools 

PUBLIC AUCTION 

The Schmid's (moving to Fla.) & Others 

DeCou Fire House, Whltehorse (Trenton), NJ 

off 2900 S. Broad St. to Hobson to Ruskin 

THURS.,OCT. 18-8:30 AM 

Sold 6:30: Silver and other coins; Rockwall-Delta band 
saw. sender-grinder table uw, shop vacuum; 
Homellght chain saw; 2 mowers; etc. Approx. 9:30: 
Good student upright piano; Rd mahog. claw foot table; 

carved server; Sheraton 2-drswer cherry stand; custom 

cherry drop leaf harvest table; Ruby Venetian vases; 

Spode; Sterling; Good china 4 glass; S. Jersey bottles; 

etc! Good Additions' Good Prints) 

Lester & Robert Slatoff 

AUCTIONEERS 
Trenton, N.J. 609-393-4848 



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HOUSE OF THE WEEK 




A RARE OPPORTUNITY. Gracious and authentic 18th century Colonial 
on four and one half acres in convenient Hopewell Township. A 30' front to 
back center hall serves the manor-sized, beamed ceiling living room and 
formal dining room. Efficient kitchen, den and full bath complete the first 
floor. Two full baths and three master-sized bedrooms on the second floor 
with a very large bedroom and bath on the third. Authenticity is here 
from the five fireplaces, each with antique mantels, nine over six blown 
glass windows, and wide pumpkin pine floors. Outside a 60' raised 
flagstone terrace, ancient specimen trees and planting. Frontage on -a 
jointly owned private pond. Enough? There's more... A horse barn, 
carriage house, heated workshop, and detached two-car garage. 
Financing to a qualified buyer. Newly offered at $245,000 

JOHNT 

^HENDERSON™ 

REALTORS^* 

Hopewell House Square, Hopewell, N.J., (609) 466-2550 



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Firestone Weal Estate 

Give Your Home the Firestone Advantage 




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A SPACIOUS EDGERSTONE CONTEMPORARY IN A 
COMM INDING HILLSIDE SETTING A very special house ior everyone 
with a dramatic flair for the contemporary ideas of Frank Lloyd Wright 
where inside is outside and the wedding ol the house and site is beautifully in- 
terwoven. Dramatic oak entryway, open air living room with fireplace, formal dining 
b picture window, eat-in kitchen with mellow contemporary wood cabinets, 

4-2222 



. carpeted family room in the garden motif with full bath nearby and laundry room In' 
the bedroom wing are three children's bedrooms, two full baths and a master suite fit 
tor a king with fresh wall to wall Berber carpet, a seperate study and newly tiled 
master bath. Need we say more, such as mature landscaping, an in-ground pool with 
cabana, and a location that can t be beat When lit up at night it dominates the whole 
area. See it before the open house by calling your Firestone agent NOW »209 000 



REALTORS 921-1700 u 



I Firestone °Real ^Estate 

Give Your Home the Firestone Advantage 



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SUPERB RANCH ON 1.9 ACRES IN MONTGOMERY TOWNSHIP We have just 
listed a four-bedroom ranch home that is ideal for the person who appreciates a 
fine collection of flowering trees, shrubs, bulbs and gardens, including apple 
plum, cherry, crabapple and dogwood trees; a wildflower garden with lady sli» 
per, jack-in-the-pulpit, blue bell, violets, plus many more varieties and many bulbs 
such as daffodils and lilies plus roses. The home itself has a living room with a 
large bay and fireplace, kitchen with excellent counter space and pantry; family 
room; and a special basement with darkroom and a full bath that suggest ex- 
pansion possibilities. To top it off, there is a 33x20 in-ground pool surrounded by a 
15' deck and cedar fence. We think you'll agree with us that this outstanding 
property is a wonderful buy at 197,000 



924-2222 



PUBLIC OPEN HOUSE, SUNDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2 to 3 p.m. 
Directions . Route 27 north to right on Raymond Road to left on Douglas Drive to 
right on Kean Court. House is number 10. 





SERENELY SITUATED IN A QUIET RIVERSIDE SETTING this spacious multi- 
level five bedroom home is walking distance to both New York and Princeton buses 
ine easily maintained large rooms make this an ideal family home. The minimal 
care needed for the luxuriously landscaped yard will leave you free on weekends to 
enjoy the outdoor barbeque. Call a Firestone agent today for a personal appointment 
to see this brand new listing ! tl 79 SO0 



] 




PRINCETON DUPLEX-COULD BE CONVERTED EASILY TO 
SUPER SINGLE FAMILY RESIDENCE This in-town home, with a 
Princeton stone foundation, is in a superb location just off Princeton Avenue. There is 
a large front porch for summer evenings, a foyer, living room with French doors to 
the dining room where a cobblestone fireplace will charm you. there is a fully 
modernized eat-in kitchen, a plant room off the back of the house, and a powder room. 
Upstairs are four more rooms and a full bath, presently being used as an apartment. 
There's a very private room in the converted attic, too. Call us today to see this new 
listing. 

1105,000 




SUPER PRINCETON TOWNSHIP BRICK DUPLEX. This two-family home IS 
located just outside the Borough. In excellent condition, it features a downstairs 
apartment with living room, dining room, modern kitchen with dishwasher, stove and 
refrigerator an enclosed porch, a sun room off the dining room, two bedrooms and 
full bath. Included with this apartment is a semi-finished basement with another full 
bath and laundry hook-ups. There is a patio in the rear and the yard is fenced in The 
second floor apartment has a living room, dining room, modern kitchen with dish- 
washer stove refrigerator and disposal, two bedrooms and a full bath A redwood 
deck off the second floor and lots of attic space go with this unit There is also a two- 
car detached garage. Excellent investment or live-in plus income situation 1135,000 



BRAND NEW LISTING IN PRINCETON WOODS DUTCH COLONIAL ON CUL 

DE-SAC Firestone Real Estate is proud to present for your inspection this char 
ming Dutch colonial home in a family neighborhood just outside of Princeton 
There are four bedrooms including a master bedroom with a walk-in closet and 
private full bath. The family room has a raised hearth fireplace and bookshelves 
The kitchen is large and eat-in with gas stove, dishwasher and garbage disposal 
This owner was transferred and is very sorry to leave this lovely, almost new 
home. Give us a call and we'U show you all the things that make this a very special 
home. i, "~ 

■ $119,900 




A TRULY SPACIOUS QUEENSTON CONDOMINIUM IN PRIN- 
CETON Within walking distance of bus, town, gown and shopping activities, the 
private end unit in Queenston Common has the best of all worlds ! No more grass, no 
more snow, no more leaves to rake and blow. Inside there are two truly large living 
space areas. First, a living room with fireplace wall overlooking a patio and with a 
study nook with built-in bookcases. And second, an open air dining room and custom 
oak eat-in kitchen arrangement where each room is large and thoughtfully functional 
Upstairs are four bedrooms and two full baths including a master suite with a walk-in 
closet and full bath There is also a children's study at the top. Downstairs is a 
separate guest quarters or personal office space with its own entrance. Be the first to 
see this exceptionally spacious condominium with your Firestone agent. $149,500 




SUPER VALUE IN EAST WINDSOR A three bedroom ranch in convenient to 
everything East Windsor. With its own touch of wilderness; the property backs up to a 
lovely brook with the backyard neatly fenced. 

The interior features a step-down family room with sliding glass doors to the brick 
patio. The modem kitchen is eat in size with real brick trim. The dining room, family 
room and kitchen all have views of the brook. This home has a full basement and 
central air conditioning. 

Call today to see this lovely home. $75,900 




HISTORIC GRIGGSTOWN Come and see this lovelv expanded cat» cod in one 
of the most charming neighborhoods in our area. There's plenty of room -living room, 
dining room, game room with fireplace, library, eat-in kitchen, enclosed heated porch 
with bookcases, plus three ore bedrooms and two full baths. Outside, vou'll eniov 
mature landscaping, a bluestone patio, and fenced garden area. We know that this 
gem will not last very long, so call us today and we'll take you right over ! $79.SO0 



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BUNKER HILL 
LANDSCAPING 

Landscape Design 
Planting • Patios 

201-359-3742 


THE WOODSHED 

Cham Clean Process 

Furniture Srnpptnq Restoration 

Bndppofft Ri. Brii M~d 

201-3»Z777 



32S 



* 



&-S0N ^ 



WALLPAPER & PAINTS 



Dutch Boy Points • Swilafnln Moore PolnU 

Martin Sonoar WIHtofMbwg Point* 

WolfcuooclnDO » Art Suppll n 

200 Kniu St »2*00S» 



NOW IS THE TIME 

TO "STORM" YOUR HOUSE 
FOR THE WINTER. 

CONTACT 

Bob Nelson 

at 

NELSON 

Glass & Aluminum Co. 
45 Spring St. 924-2880 



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Wm. B.May Co., Inc 

Real Estate 



SerqeantsviMe. N J 08567 609-397-1907 



Are You Selling? Are You Insuring? 

Furniture • China • Glass 

Art Objects • Silver • Jewelry 



Lester 

AND 

Robert 



M 



Attend 
Auctions 



AUCTIONEER 

Antique Dealer • Appraiser 
777 W. State St. 393-4848 Trenton, IVI.J. 



OBecause... 

the cost of a new house leaves little room In the 
budget lor unexpected expenses, let our ex- 
perienced 

LICENSED PROFESSIONAL ENGINEERS 

Inspect your new home from the foundation to the 
roof before you buy. 

• Compr •h«n«ive Wrltton Reports • 

Call tor our brochure! 

609-921-3775 



PRINCETON HOME 
INSPECTION SERVICE. INC. 



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CROSSROADS 



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NEWEST PRINCETON CONTEMPORARY. Cathedral 
ceilings in living room and in large family room. 4 to 5 
bedrooms, 2% bath Ranch In marvelously convenient 
location. $132,500 



PRINCETON CROSSROADS 
REALTY, INC. 
342 NASSAU ST 
609-924-4677 



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HB.ltiarfi 



EXECUTIVE HOME IN THE COUNTRY. Minutes from 
Princeton. Loving attention to detail and quality. 5 
bedrooms, Vh baths. $249,000 



Linda Carnevale 

Aniuta Blanc 

Joan Wojcik 

Hazel Stix 

Lois Fee 



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HUGE, HUGE, HUGE ROOMS! Wide center hall, living 
room, dining room, eat-In kitchen, 4 bedrooms, all on 
one floor. Private, fenced-in yard. Full basement. In 
Princeton for only $124,000 




IN TOWN CONVENIENCE: Walk to schools, shopping 
and transportation. Cathedral ceiling and fireplace In 
living room. Friendly neighborhood. Quiet cul-de-sac. 

$130,000 



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CHECK OUT THE ITEMS at the Charity 
rescheduled Saturday, October 13, all 


19TI MAVERICK, 
original owner. $400 


csss 


FOR SALE single bed with metal bate. 
box spring and mattress, $40; 
bookshelf, U0; kitchen table, S30. 


52 


RUMMAGE SALE 
Medthodlsf Chur 
vendeventer Street, 


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atmospheric conditions ot a normal 


"SFSttEtE 


FOR RENT: Excellent I bedroom 
Borough house including garage $435 



FULLER BRUSHES 

BEN D MARUCA 

l7SKcd».NMl Avenue 

Til. NNN-1254 
Trenton. N.J. 08610 



FOR BUSINESS-MINDED PEOPLE 




ZONED C-1 

NEIGHBORHOOD RETAIL 

COMMERCIAL 

Approximately 2,000 square feet on the first 
floor alone. 4 3-4 acres to create as much 
parking as needed. Located on a well- 
traveled road in Hopewell. Call for more 
details. 

ASSOCIATES REALTY 
OF PRINCETON 

162 Nassau Street 

Princeton, N.J. 08540 

609-924-6501 



Available Nov. 


S. Call 914-4710 




WHO WOULD LIKE TO DONATE 
baby clothes to young people In 
Germany? Please call 799-0430. 


East 


HOUSEMATE!! 

share. 9J4-28S2 


) WANTED: 1 or 


r'om 



KR0ESEN REALTY 

Realtor 

2 West Broad St. 

Hopewell, N.J. 08525 

609-466-1224 



l OO B O PBOOeC DDOOB e OO D ODOODI 

SKILLMAN FURNITURE 

* Local and New Jersey State Moving 

* Used Furniture: Chests, dressers, unfinished bookcases etc. 

* Special of the Week: Cordovan Mahogany dining room table and 
6 chairs. French Provincial Breakfront. 

Hours: Monday thru Friday 9-5; Sat. 9-1 ISiSI 

21 2 Alexander St.. Princeton 924-1 881 1 isi 




t MOB: 67.000 mile*. 4 speed c 
vertlbla, good condition. SI, 850 i 
w 4 7008 or 7w-4t38 evening* only. 



NO TABLE FOR SALE. With 
allot rut*, and tiling 
Mat offer. Call 329*459 




A once-in-a-lifetime offering! Authentic colonial farm 
estate with as little as 3.5 acres for purchaser wanting 
private residence. More land (up to 28 acres) available for 
buyers looking for RESEARCH-ENGINEERING-OFFICE 
COMPLEX, just minutes from Princeton in nearby 
Montgomery. Gracious main house affords all the 
amenities. Four bedrooms, 3 baths on the second floor; 
two more bedrooms, 1 bath and ample storage on the 
third! Rentable apartment over garage. Huge barn in 
excellent condition. Extra dividends: 35' screened porch, 
greenhouse, pool, pond, handsome landscaping. This 
property has many, many possibilities, all for a fraction of 
its replacement value. Asking $275,000 

JOHNT 

CHENDERSON 

REALTORS^^ 

4 Charlton Street, Princeton, N.J. 08540 • (609) 921-2776 



RENTALS 



RIVERSIDE DRIVE in Princeton - Apartment with living room, 
kitchen, bedroom and bath. References required. Available 
Immediately. Unfurnished. $350 per month plus utilities. 

FAIRFIELD DRIVE in Kingston - A pristine Colonial near the 
busline for easy commuting to Princeton or New York City. Entry 
foyer, living room, separate dining room, powder room, family 
room with fireplace. Upstairs, four bedrooms, two and one half 
baths. Full, dry basement, central air, wall to wall carpeting 
throughout. Two-car garage. References required. Available 
soon. Unfurnished. $600 per month plus utilities. 

RIVERSIDE DRIVE In Princeton - Apartment with living room, 
dining room, kitchen, three bedrooms and two baths. References 
required. Available November 1st. Unfurnished. $625 per month 
plus utilities. 

MEADOW RUN DRIVE In West Windsor. Spacious contemporary 
with living room, dining room, kitchen, game room. Four 
bedrooms, two baths, finished basement. References required. 
Available Immediately. Unfurnished. $675 per month plus 
utilities. 

MARION ROAD WEST in Princeton. Split level with living room, 
dining room, kitchen, three plus bedrooms, two and one half 
baths. Partial basement, two-car garage, laundry, central air, 
electronic cleaner, beautiful yard, enclosed porch. References 
required. Available November 1st. $690 per month plus utilities. 

CANAL ROAD In Grlggstown. Farm house with living room, 
dining room, kitchen, study, five bedrooms, three baths. Three 
working fireplaces, Interior newly painted. References required. 
Available Immediately. Unfurnished. $1,000 per month plus 
utilities. 

CLEVELAND LANE in Princeton. Living room, dining room, 
kitchen, family room, library, six bedrooms, four and one half 
baths. References required. Available January 1st. Furnished. 
$1 ,000 per month plus utilities. 

WILSON ROAD in Princeton. A gem of a modern house designed 
by Thaddeus Longstreth, the house has almost an acre of land, 
yet is |ust a short ten minutes walk from Palmer Square. Three 
bedrooms, three and one half baths. Large living and dining 
rooms References required. Available immediately. Unfur- 
nished. $750 per month 



TO PRINCETON REAL ESTATE CALL: 
921-7784 



r 



Robert E. Dougherty 



Claire Burns 
Anne Cresson 
Valerie Cunningham 
Julie Douglas 
Betsy Stewardson Ford 



Georgia H. Graham 
Barbara Rose Hare 
Pam Harris 
Toby Laughlln 

WiHiamE Stewardson(1935-1972l 

Realtors 



Fritzie Moore 
Sylvia Nesbltt 
Joan Pey 
Emma Wirtz 



Representing Previews Executive Home Search 



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CLASSY CONTEMPORARY 

Like to entertain? You'll love this' property! Inside there's 5 bedrooms, 2 full baths, 
and a MASSIVE recreation room with fireplace. Outside are 4 acres and a private 
brook complete with ducks! Set In horse country $149,900 




EWING TOWNSHIP 



Immaculate Bi-level with 4 bedrooms, 1 % baths, dining room, attached garage and 
more. Only three years young! $66,900 




EAST WINDSOR 



Great looking split with 3-4 bedrooms, full tile bath and 2 powder rooms, full wall 
fireplace in family room, and plush carpeting throughout! Just listed $85,900 




ALLENTOWN AREA' 



Constructed more than a century ago, this charming Colonial Farmhouse has It all 
Large^ooms, wide plank floors, rustic fireplaces and even a chalrTall! FOUR PLUS 

$110,900 



ToxC&FLazo 



cooking 

Can be 

eferences 



REALTORS 

ASK ABOUT OUR ^ 18 OFFICES ASK ABOUT OUR GUARANTEED 

EQUITY RELEASE PROGRAM 



Drame Division 
IHNnuuStrMI 
Princeton, N J. 



EquiIHoumil Opportunity 

54 Princeton-Hightatown Road 

Princeton Junction, N J. 

60*793-2022 

SINCE 1886 



SALES PLAN! 



McCay Division 

Rles. 130&206 

Bordentown. N.J. 

609-298-1600 






ROOMMATE WANTE 



PROGRAMMER 



SS3 


Call (or appointment 


1776 KAWASAKI 


350cc Motorcycle, on 

600. Call 934-4712 after 
10-3-tl 


FIREWOOD FOR 


SALE: Halt cord, $45, 
Split, stacked and 



i opposite sui 



PRINCETON 
BOROUGH 

Office Space 

150 Square leel to 3,400 
square feet. Modern 
building with parking 
location, 145 Wlther- 
spoon Street. 

Call Houghton Co. 
924-1882 



(s 



OOK 



lr COMTANY 
ESTABLISHED 1893 

REALTORS 

P.O. Box 685 350 Alexander Street 

Princeton, N.J. 08540 

609-924-0322 

A COMPLETE REAL ESTA TE ORGANIZA TION 

COMMERCIAL RENTALS 

On Nassau Street, approximately 510 square feet 
available Immediately for $600 per month 



On Route 206. ne; 
with private bath ; 



- Princeton Airport 584ejquare feet, 
imple parking $300 per month 



PARKING SPACES 

available Immediately. Call for details. 

RESIDENTIAL RENTALS 

Studio apartment on a "Tree Street" - walk I 
everywhere! Newly decorated. ' 

$350 per month Including heat 

3 bedroom townhouse on South Harrison has a large 
kitchen with most appliances, and other newly 
decorated rooms, with hardwood floors, fireplace, 
bookcases and more $550 per month 

On Jefferson Road, a FURNISHED 3-bedroom house 
amid trees. Garage Included. Available Immediately! 

$600 per month 

On Terhune Road, a 3-bedroom ranch with a main- 
tenance-tree pool and a 2-car garage. Available for 2 
" ea,sl $850 per month 

In Kingston, a short walk from the NYC bus, a 4- 
bedroom colonial available now. $850 per month 

A 4-bedroom, 2% bath contemporary ranch available 
$650 per month 




N.I Callaway 

REAL ESTATE ^ 

4 NASSAU STREET PRINCETON. NEW JERSEY 08540 
921-1050 



DIANNE F. BLEACHER 
PETE CALLAWAY 
PATCAHILL 
ANNE GALLAGHER 
LINDA L. HOFF 
JUDYMcCAUGHAN 
CHARLOTTE MCLAUGHLIN 
TERRY MERRICK 
BILL ROEBLING 
WILLA STACKPOLE 
KATHARINE G.WERT 
ELEANORS YOUNG 




princeton-lawrenuevilLe r 

Rare find -- a beautiful old stone house, circa 
1800. Classic center hall separates the music 
room and library from the living and dining 
rooms. True country kitchen, wide floor 
boards, deep window sills, high ceilings and 
7 fireplaces. Small study, four large 
bedrooms plus a separate wing that would 
make a nice apartment. Secluded convered 
porch and deck overlook two plus acres 
which border Stony Brook. Large restored 
barn. $230,000 



A VIEW FROM THE RIDGE 

One of Princeton's most admired houses and 
almost five partially wooded acres. Gracious 
reception hall, panelled living room, sun 
room, shelved den, attractive dining room 
and four fireplaces. Five bedrooms and baths 
plus a housekeepers wing. Lovely pool and a 
pool house. An exceptional property! 

$185,000 



HODGE ROAD 

Delightful Edwardian Cottage in private 
setting within walking distance of Nassau 
Street. Large entrance hall flanked by a living 
room with fireplace and French doors 
leading to veranda on one side and a library 
enhanced by leaded glass windows and 
fireplace on the other. French doors In the 
dining room open to a large deck overlooking 
lovely gardens and walled pool area. Updated 
kitchen. Five bedrooms and three baths on 
two upper levels. $250,000 




LAMBERT DRIVE 

Contemporary additions add a youthful flair 
to this handsome Colonial. Large living room 
with fireplace, panelled family room 
enhanced by fireplace, built-ins and 
cathedral celling, modern kitchen and a 
separate breakfast room. Both the den and 
dining room open out to a lovely terrace. 
Four bedrooms, two baths on the second 
floor. Game room, laundry and storage In 
basement. Detached two car garage. Lovely, 
treed hillside setting. May also be rented for 
one year, call for particulars. $249,000 



One of Hopewell's favorite Victorians, 
featuring high ceilings and spacious rooms 
with distinctive chestnut woodowrk. Large 
windows for light; the fireplace in the dining 
room adds extra charm. The private back 
yard boasts a brick patio. Four bedrooms 
and a large attic with great potential. 

$110,000 



HARRISON STREET 

Investment property - newly zoned for the 
following professional uses -- architect, 
accountant, lawyer, planner, engineer or 
medical. Two separate offices, approx. 2,000 
sq. ft. May also be rented. Two bedroom 
apartment on the second floor, presently 
rented. Fifteen parking spaces behind 
building. $230,000 



3 311 


SB* 


ESTABLISHED GIFT SHOP 




PRIME LOCATION - 13 Palmer Square West. 
Thirty-seven years old. Owner moving. 977 
square feet, plus full basement for storage. 
Price is negotiable, to be established at time 
of closing, depending on Inventory - call for 
details. Must be sold by the end of the 
month. 



PRINCETON 



A new Tudor house located on quiet Gallup Road. 
Large entrance hall with semi-circular stairway, 
living room, panelled (amily room with fireplace, 
eat-in kitchen and a large dining room. First floor 
bedroom or den, full bath, laundry - mud room and 
powder room. Upstairs are four bedrooms, two 
baths, walk-in closet, dressing room and balcony 
off the master bedroom. Brick, stucco and natural 
cedar shingles allow an easy to maintain house. 

$205,000 



RANDOM ROAD 



Story and a half Colonial situated on a large, 
treed corner lot. Living room with fireplace, 
dining "L", den or sitting room, kitchen with 
pine cabinets, two bedrooms or family room 
and sitting room and full first floor bath. Two 
bedrooms and sitting room or kitchen for "In- 
law" apartment and full bath on the 2nd 
floor. Full basement, one car garage. 
Flagstone terrace overk *s a pretty yard 
which gently slopes down to a brook. 

$127,500 



Adlerman,Click & Co. 



924-0401 




For All Area Listings 

Realtors — Insurors 



15 Spring St., Princeton, N.J. 

Evenings -324-1 239 



586-1020 



Joan Alport 
Dan Faccini 
Ros Greenberg 
Barbara Plnkham 
Esther Pogrebin 
Myrna Ahmed 
Phyllis Levin 
Marlene Horovltz 



Sarah Larach 
Dorothy Kramer 
Natalie V. Katz 
Jane Lamberly 
Suki Lewfn 
EdyceRosenthale 
Ed Kimble. Jr. 
Rosary O'Neill 



Members : Princeton Real Kstate (.roup. Multiple Listing Service. World Wide Relocation Service 
(iini mnpetenl Staff Can Show You Any And Every Home In The Area! 




PRINCETON CONTEMPORARY brick ranch with 4 
bedrooms. 2 full baths, living room with brick free- 
standing raised hearth fireplace, dining room, family 
room, centra] air and 2 car garage. $129,500 



THE WONDERFUL WORLD OF WEST WINDSOR 

awaits you! ! Come see this spotless center hall with 4 
bed rooms, 24 baths, family room with fireplace, 
separate dining room, living room, kitchen, central air 
and two car garage 1129,500 

LOCATED ON 9.5 ACRES WHICH MAY BE SUB- 
DIVIDED, we are offering this 1 4 story home with 3+ 
bedrooms, 24 baths, 2 separate kitchens. 2 living 
rooms il with fireplace), dining room, beautiful in- 
ground outdoor pool. Sanitary sewer, city water and 
gas available Asking $240,000 

NEW COLONIAL ON I ACRE! Carefree and spacious 
& well constructed, this 4 bedroom, 24 bath colonial is 
brand new to the market If you've waited for a 
gracious entry, large living room, formal dining room, 
eat-in kitchen, and family room with fireplace, full 
basement & great floor plan - let us show you a home 
designed for entertainment and family enjoyment on a 
full acre at $99,900 

SITUATED ON WOODED 4 ACRE LOT, this 4 
bedroom, 24 bath home has living room, dining room, 
eat-in kitchen, panelled family room with fireplace. 



SPECTACULAR REDWOOD CONTEMPORARY- 
HOME in Princeton Township situated on 2+ acre lot! 
Featuring 4 bedrooms, 34 baths, living room, library, 
study, family room, 2 fireplaces, fantastic kitchen, 
central air. and 2 car garage, this custom con- 
temporary has everything you could possibly want in a 
home. An added attraction is the heated Sylvan pool 
with lighting both inside and out. $350,000 



THE ALL AMERICAN HOME! This beautifully 
constructed custom ranch is made to order for the 
discerning couple or small family. With 3 bedrooms, 
early American decor in living and dining room and a 
charming country kitchen, it has a full basement with 
cedar closet, with its manicured private lot only 
minutes from commuting and West Windsor top 
schools - this is a home that now-a-days is hard to find! 
AFFORDABLE 




THE PERFECT PRINCETON LOCATION next to the 
Herrontown Woods - 4 bedrooms, 24 bath Colonial on 
wooded 14 acre lot Large living room, formal dining 
room, eat-in kitchen with deck for outside dining, 
family room with full brick fireplace, full basement, 2 
car garage, and central air. $164,900 




OUR 3 BEDROOM RANCH features living room, 
dining room, family room, 2 baths, kitchen, and 2 car 
garage Ideal location and in excellent condition Just 
reduced and a good buy at $97,500 

COUNTRIFIED - Ranch with 4 bedrooms. living room 
with fireplace, 2 baths, eat-in kitchen and garage 
Entire rear yard fenced by Poplars and shrubs 

$54,900 

IF YOU'RE LOOKING FOR A HAPPY ENDING TO 
HOME HUNTING, this could be it! 3 bedroom ranch 
with living room, separate dining room, kitchen, bath, 
full basement and garage. $59,000 

ARE YOU LOOKING FOR A NEW HOME? We have 
two new custom colonials featuring large rooms 
throughout 4 bedrooms, 24 baths, separate dining 
room, family room with fireplace, kitchen with 
separate breakfast area, central air, gas heat, full 
basement and 2 car garage Wooded lots with Green 
acres in rear Call to see 

$144,900 & $149,900 

ATTRACTIVE INCOME PROPERTY- The ultimate 
hedge against inflation 3 good houses on 1 property - a 
3 bedroom ranch home to live in or rent, 2 rental houses 
with new kitchens and roofs and fine tenants, 
numerous outbuildings on 20 acres of land for farming, 
horses, etc. Terms for eligible buyer. 

$115,000 



EIGHTY THOUSAND NINE AND SIMPLY DIVINE! 

Our executive sized colonial is 6 years old and in im- 
peccable condition If you require a formal dining 
room, paneled family room, lovely eat-in kitchen and 
four fine bedrooms, 24 baths, you'll love this fine home 
with its newly painted exterior and delightful family 
neighborhood at an oaffordable $80,900 

ROOSEVELT, often referred to as a unique town 
having an excellent school system and country-type 
living, features this 3 bedroom ranch with living room 
with floor to ceiling windows, dining el with 8 foot 
sliding glass door to large fenced-in lawn with a 
background of woods, and an all butcher block kitchen 
with a Mexican hie floor. A really warm, sunny home 
for a reasonable price. Asking $52,900 



A GOOD BUY — 3 bedroom ranch with large modern 
eat-in kitchen, panelled family room, 1 full bath, 1 car 
garage and central air. $42,000 

SUPER HIGHWAY LOCATION - Broad Commercial 
and multi-use zoning makes this custom home on one 
acre a fine investment Splendid kitchen, oversized 
dining room, living room, large eating porch and 
numerous fine rooms are suitable for office. 
restaurant, home or any purpose. Don't miss out - cali 
for details! Only $K5,000 



IN TOWN LIVING - Convenient to schools, shopping 
and buses. 3 bedrooms, 14 baths, breezeway, kitchen 
dining area, living room with fireplace, central air 
conditioning, full basement, and garage Lovely rear 
yard Potential professional use. $125,000 

SEARCHING FOR A SPECIAL RANCH? Come see 
our new listing! ! Entrance foyer, living room, dining 
room, family room, 3 bedrooms, 14 baths, central air 
and 2 car garage. Also included ate intercom system, 
burglar alarm system (light timer) and smoke alarm. 
Excellent floor plan and situated on a 4 acre lot. 

$78,500 

SITUATED ON 4 ACRE, this 3 bedroom ranch 
features living room, dining room, kitchen, bath and 
garage. Nicely landscaped. $37,250 

RENTALS 

Off ice space on Nassau Street $350 per mo. 

Townhouses $300 & $500 per mo. 

HOUSE FOR RENT - three bedroom, one-bath ranch 
on half acre lot. Living room, large kitchen-dining 
room combination, and one-car garage. 

$350 per mo. plus utilities 



LAND & INVESTMENTS 

$85,000 — 6 acres on Route 1 near turnaround 
$180,000 — for 5 houses — fine income on 2 acres 
100 stunning acres - PR. "RFD" area - farm assessed. 

49 Acres — Industrial Land — Washington Township 
24.43 Acres — Contiguous to American Cyanamid. 

Commercial building in Hightstown $95,000 

Stained Glass Studio in the heart of Princeton $40,000 

TO SETTLE ESTATE - Approximately 86 acres in 
Princeton Junction. 

Excellent Buy at $5,500 per acre 



"Beautiful Things for Gracious Living" 

THE RUG & FURNITURE MART 

and 

IVY MANOR SHOWROOMS 

Princeton Shopping C»ni«r 921-9100 or 921-9292 



IJULIUSH. GROSS 

Painting and Papering Contractor 

For Your Home or Business 
Call 924- 1 474 for a Free Estimate 




MAHN WHO WANTS PRINCETON 
ELECTRICAL CONTRACTING CUSTOMERS' 
Mt-«**-lllJ N.J. License N 441* 

Reasonable Price) offer ineir services through the 
SATISFIED CUSTOMER Community Phone Booh v 2J M 


JAMES IRISH TREE EXPERTS 

Princeton, New Jersey 

924-3470 

Residential maintenance of young and 

established trees and shrubs. 

Trimming - Topping 

Removals -Feeding 

Cabling • Wood Chips 

- INSURED - 


1 31 M PRINTEX LEGAL KITS 


Divorce. Wills, Bankruptcy. Separation. 


COMMUNITY 

PHONE BOOKS THINKING ABOUT LANDSCAPING? 

•3 Nassau st. l.| ouf professional landscape ar 


LAWRENCE TOWNSHIP 

HWY. DEVELOPMENT 

OFF U.S. 1 — Historical. 4 apartmenl building with 
2 75 acres Has many commercial uses 

DEAN REALTY 

Realtor 882-S8S1 


W TOu't E | *th E Y °d U '' FECT TAK,NO OOERIER LANDSCAPES, INC. 
where vou are and' where o nt Oeiigner-Contr actors 


.»,««».«»,. M.-H 




teed hln 8eile a Mea^ r Ro^ln^ 0r v34 J04) a or EVE F0 * AHT 
201 359-5W3 * 10 N * Spring Si 


AGENCY REALTY W0RLD - 




PROFESSIONAL FLOOR STRIPPING . 
AND WAXING. Reasonable rales, 34 

hour service Best Cleaning Co. 71* Perhaps Voo'll Find 
1760 7-2S-M What You'd Looking For 




f^t n> S Main Slrret 

[H MLS 737-1330 Pe " n """ t " ,NJ 
You can feel at home with us 


"HELLOGOODBUYSI" 

MEN'S ALTERATION on clothing by A Character and Class Thrift Shop 
expert tailor either purchased here or lw WltherspoonSt , Princeton 
elsewhere Princeton Clothing Co, 17' Tues -Frl 11am 7pm 



THE BEST BUY IN ANY AREA is this usually not the biggest or 
most expensive house. This beautiful traditional 1 V6 story set on 
almost 3 handsome wooded acres is In an area where recent sales 
have ranged from $250,000 to over $300,000 so we think the buyer 
of this property has a chance to make one of the best buys of the 
year. A much sought after kind of house these days, It Is 
economical to heat, easy to maintain and not far from the center 
of town. The house has 3 bedrooms, 2 baths on the first floor as 
well as 2 bedrooms, full bath upstairs that can be used when 
needed or closed off when not needed. Both the attractive living 
and the huge panelled family rooms have fireplaces. There Is 
separate dining room and a handsome screened porch. Call us 
for more Information and an appointment to see this ex- 
traordinary property $229,000 



Beauty, comfort, flexibility -- this spacious home has them 
all. Perfect for a large family or In-law situation, or rent one 
or two rooms for increased Income. Attractive entry hall, 
large living room with raised-hearth Heatllator fireplace, 
dining room, eat-in kitchen with laundry area, one and a half 
baths plus three other good-sized rooms on first floor. 
Separate entrance from hall to second floor, where there are 
three more large bedrooms and two full baths. Fully air- 
conditioned, big basement, two-car garage. Flagstone open 
front porch and back terrace. Even an In-ground wading pool 
and treehouse. All this on wooded two-thirds acre In the 
desirable Johnson Park school district. The price? A low 
$142,500. 

Take Route 206 to Mansgrove Road. West on Mansgrove to Woodland 

Drive. 

JOHNT 

CHENDERSON 

REALTORS^"* 

4 Charlton Street. Princeton, N.J. 08540 • (609) 921-2776 



Hahn Electrical Contracting 

Have an electrical engineer 
solve your electrical needs. 



I ndu «trt« l/C omm«fc la I 

• General 

• Maintenance 

• S H A Consulting 

• Control Design 

Princeton/Skillman 



R*sid»ntUt 

• Complete Wiring Service 

• Increased Capacity 

• Pool and Palio Wiring 

• Additional Outlets 

609-466-1313 



Howe 

tervlng people ilnce 1885 
realtors- Imuran 

Trie GaUer v of Homes 

One Palmei Square • PRINCETON 
924 0095 

WEST WINDSOR 'PENNINGTON • ELEUINOTON 
HAMILTON • SEA GIRT 



NOTICE 

compliance with a ruling 
; State Supreme Court, all 
newspapers must ascertain 
that employment ads do not 
discriminate between sexes 

For example, titles such as 
"Salesman." "Nurse" and Girl 
Friday" should be replaced, 
respectively, by "Salesper- 
son. "Nurse (M/W)" and 
"General Office Work M/W" 
TOWN TOPICS has a copy of 
the Division of civil Rights 
booklet, "A Guide for Em- 
ployers to the New Jersey Law 
against Discrimination," and 
will provide assistance in the 
wording of all such ads upon 



equest 



Adv 



cooperation is sought in 
meeting the requirements of 



Harry A. Bloor 

Contractor mine 

Plumbing & Heating Trade 

896-0692 



Princeton Music Center 

TV SERVICE 



I best] 

y FLOOR COMPANY < 

tf * FLOOR SANDING ^ 

V • FLOOR STAINING V 

X • RESTORATION U 

[/ Free Estimates 924"1 760 ? 



TOWN TOPICS Is dell 
Borough and TowniMp 
Hopewell, Montgomery 



COUNTRY RENTALS 

All brick Queen Anne Estate with four 
bedrooms, 2'/» baths completely secluded in 
Lawrence Township, one mile to downtown 
Princeton $1 ,275/month 

Included one bedroom guest cottage. 

g Princeton Township - three bedroom farmhouse 

£ with barn for horses surrounded by 100 acres. 

$600/mon.h 

Stone and frame farmhouse with four bedrooms in 

Delaware Township, completely secluded and 

recently renovated, 25 miles to Princeton. 

1460/month 
Call 




• Ctfcfom cut stone 

• Free do it yoursell literature 


WILLIAMSON 

CONSTRUCTION CO. 

ROOFING 


OELAWA.E VALLEY ' 


• Shingle, Hot Tar • Quality Work 
& Slate Roofs • Bonded 

• Old Roofs Repaired • Free Estimates 

• New Roofs Installed • Prompt Service 

"SERVING ALL MERCER COUNTY" 


4-4-321 ! 


921-1184 

P.O. Box 2194, Princeton, N.J. 



The seclusion of 



Princeton Court 



RAYMOND ROAD SOUTH BRUNSWICK NEW 

i North of Princeton bet 
I ond 27 




Outstanding 4 ond 5 bedroom homes with all the 
amenities, everything you need for comfortable living. 

OPEN HOUSE 

SATURDAY & SUNDAY 
NOON TO 6 

DIRECTIONS: Princeton Kingston Rood North to 
Raymond Rood. Raymond Rood to Princeton Court. 
Models on your right. 



^HENDERSON 

BPAiTntfO^ 



4 Oiortton Street. Princeton. N.J. 06540 (609) 921-2776 




HOUGHTON REAL ESTATE 



INTERESTED IN ANTIQUES? 




Why not buy this authentic Colonial which is the site of an 
existing antique business and shop. The property also provides 
extra income from 2 apartments. You couldn't go wrong with 
this location just outside Princeton. $198,500 

PRIME ACREAGE 

81.3 acres of land located on Clarksville Road, West Windsor 
Township. Excellent road frontage, zoned research, office 
building, limited manufacturing. Suitable for Office Park. 

$12,000 per acre 

RENTAL — PERFECT FAMILY RESIDENCE 

Three acres of wooded privacy. Four (4) bedrooms, 3 full baths 
fireplaces in living room and master bedroom. Available 
November 1. $700 per month 



MEMBER OF 

Multiple Listing Service 

Mercer, Somerset Counties 



LB 



Princeton Real 
Estate Group 



John H. HoughtOtl, Licensed Broker 
New Jersey and Pennsylvania 



8 Palmer Square E., Princeton, N.J. 08540 
(located at the Nassau Inn building) 

609-924-1001 

FREE PARKING PALMER SQUARE PARK & SHOP 



ANTJ NUCLEAR I 



FILING CABINETS, Come an0 w «,, EXPERT LANDSCAPING SERVICE SPECIALIZING IN THE UNUSUAL 

metal tiling cabinets for ofnceor home 

Grey, tan, olive. 2 or 4 drawer Also DRIVEWAYS CONSTRUCTED Jewell by Juliana 

ivpmgtabies Hmkson's, S? Nassau Precious lewets sat In H and 18 cera 1 

* 10 " M Atpnelt or stone gold Designed and created lust tor you 



WANTED— GUNS. SWORDS. 



SaWE® 

YOUR OLD 
NEWSPAPERS 
FOR 
RECYCLING 



CHECK OUTTHE ITEMS at me Charity 
Mart. Lawrence Shopping Center 
Saturday. October 13, all 



HOUSE FOR 



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N.C.JEFFERSON 

PLUMBING— HEATING 
CONTRACTOR 



Roofing Heating] * 

COOPER &SCHAFER 

SHEET MfTAl WORK Egg 

S3 Mora. Avenue [ 

Tel. 924-2063 ■"■»' 





STEWARDSON- DOUGHERTY 

^ftf/ Estate Associates, Incorporated 

366 Nassau Street, Trinceton, J(ew Jersey 08540 

'Phone: 609-92 1 -J784 



FOR LUXURY CONDOMINIUM BUYERS IN THE PRINCETON 
AREA we offer a fine alternative with these advantages: 1) West 
end Borough location, two minutes walking distance to the 
Nassau Club and five minutes walking distance to Palmer Square 
2) Immediate occupancy 3) Competitively priced, but with much 
more space — Intrigued? Let us show you this peerless 
Townhouse located on Mercer Street in Princeton's historical 
district. Five working fireplaces, eleven foot ceilings, handsome 
architectural detailing, new architect designed kitchen. Two 
living rooms, book lined library, informal sitting room with quarry 
tile floor, four or five bedrooms, 4 four and a half baths. French 
doors open off formal dining room to Charleston style veranda 
and lovely walled garden. Tree hidden two car garage. The 
convenience and low upkeep of intown living. Elegant and 
special. Minimal maintenance. All in exquisite condition. 

$240,000 





EDGERSTOUNE In this lovely residential enclave a one floor 
architect designed contemporary, comfortable and manageable 
in size, but done with real elegance and flair. An entry hallway 
leads to a bright living room with stone fireplace and Thermopane 
windows overlooking the garden and swimming pool. An ad- 
joining dining room has the same view plus doors to a wrap- 
around bluestone terrace. Swift kitchen with dishwasher, 
disposal, breakfast bar, etc. Playroom, bedroom and bath near 
the kitchen for children or a live-In. Three family bedrooms, full 
bath, plus master bedroom, dressing area and bath. Central air, 
lots of wall to wall carpeting, heated pool ... Almost an acre of 
land, the terraces, pool and landscaping are exceptionally at- 
tractive. All is in first-rate shape. $225,000 



A VERSATILE COLONIAL IN A PREMIUM LOCATION This at- 
tractive multi-level Colonial carefully screened by luxuriant 
landscaping is located In Edgerstoune - perhaps Princeton's 
finest family neighborhood. An entry hall with adjoining study 
leads to a well proportioned living room with fine view of the 
private grounds. A separate dining room, kitchen with breakfast 
area, maid's room and full bath, and guest lavatory complete the 
first floor. Several steps from the study Is a separate suite; also 
accessible by separate outside stairway with large bedroom, 
study alcove and bath -- a perfect set-up for a rental flat. On 
second floor, there are three more bedrooms and two baths. 
Lovely brick patios, attached two-car garage. $228,500 




SLEEP A LITTLE LONGER AND SOUNDER In this well built 
Buccl Colonial just five minutes from the trlan station In West 
Windsor. The first floor contains living room, separate dining 
room, large eat-in kitchen, family room with fireplace and 
lavatory. On second, there Is a master bedroom with bath, three 
other bedrooms and hall bath. Full basement, two-car garage, 
central air. An acre of ground with new plantings around house 
and trees along driveway. $158,000 



Robert E. Dougherty 
Claire Burns 
Anne Cresson 
Valerie Cunningham 



Julie Douglas 
Betsy Stewardson Ford 
Georgia Graham 
Barbara Hare 



William E. Stewardson (1935- 1 9 72) p a m Harris 

REALTORS Toby Laughlin 

Representing ".Exchange International Relerral Service Fritzie Moore 



Sylvia Nesbitt 
Joan Pey 
Emma Wirtz 



H-iy.y.y.y my .Y' ■ ■ ' I' .^y iv 1 v.v .'i'lv.v.V.W.T' 



v 



;A\W»V.VaV.V.VW 



ERIC ^C 

THE EXPERT HANDYMAN ^^ 
924-5792 % 



194 Alexander St 
924-0041 



NOTICE 

AD real estate advertised 
in TOWN TOPICS is 
subject to the Federal Fair 
Housing Act of 1968 which 
makes it illegal to ad- 
vertise "any preference, 
limitation or discrimina- 
tion based on race, color, 
religion or national origin, 
or an intention to make 
any such preference, 
limitation or discrimina- 
tion." 

TOWN TOPICS will not 
knowingly accept any 
advertising for real estate 
which is in violation of the 
law, Our readers are 
hereby informed that all 
dwellings advertised in this 
newspaper are available on 
an equal opportunity basis. 



Experienced Professionals 

PAPERHANGING & PAINTING 
737-1789 

Anglo P aperh an gin g & Painting Co. 




dip'n /If ip- 

FOR YOUR FURNITURE 

OUR REFERENCE YOUR NEIGHBORS 

y^t • Reflnlshlng • Repairing 

JP-j • Hand Stripping 



• Rushing 

4>M*lnStTM< 



Caning 
Kingston. N.J. 



(609) 924-5668 




ZjyTZ! 

CARNEGIE REALTY, Inc. 

Each Office Is Independently Owned And Operated 

229 Nassau Princeton Circle 

921-6177 452-2188 



246 NASSAU STREET PRINCETON NEW JEHSEf 

REALTORS 609-92 1-1550 

OUR NEWEST LISTING! 



*m 




\ 



No picture can do justice to this perfect 4-bedroom country traditional 
ideally located close to the center ot Rocky Hill with access to shopping 
and other actjvities. The brick-floored entrance hall gives easy access to 
spacious carpeted living room, a step-down dining room with high 
ceiling, ultra modern kitchen with eating area There is a large family 
room with door opening to beautiful terrace which overlooks handsome 
grounds For the energy conscious there is a very attractive Norwegian 
wood-burning stove in the family room Close by is a marvelous cozy 
den or study where adults can get away Upstairs there are four at- 
tractive bedrooms and 2 full baths. This is one of those exciting "better 
than" offerings that should be iresistible. Call us today to hear more 
-'.-.-.. • v*or an appointment to see H $129,500 

Another Unique Peyton Listing 

921-1550 



n 



Studio 

1 &2 

Bedrooms 

starting at 

$ 210 

Steele, Roskrff 

and Smith 

Realtors and Insurors 
Members of MLS 
[609] 655-0080 
[6091 448-681 1 

Twin Rivers Town Center 



PRINCETON JUNCTION CAPE COD with mother- 
daughter apartment. Lovely setting, mature trees 
and shrubs facing RCA's park-like setting $91 ,500 
PRINCETON INCOME PROPERTY: Two units - 
large main floor two bedroom apartment with 
fireplace in living room, full dining room; small 
upstairs apartment Walk to Choir College and 
shopping Good return. $89,500 

OUR -NEWEST LISTING, Kendall Park, three 
bedroom ranch on wide quiet street, den. fenced 
yard, carpet and appliances included Convenient 
to busline. $62i900 



See us about a Career in Real Estate 

Take advantage of our International Network of 
Referrals and Top Commission Program In- 
tensive training provided. 
Join our Compatible Offices at Two Terrific 
Princeton Locations 

Make an appointment with Mary Ostheim to talk 
about Your Future in Real Estate 



RENTALS 
PRINCETON, part/furnished 4 bedroom $650 

FRESH IMPRESSIONS S Brunswick 3 bedroom 

$575 
BRUNSWICK ACRES 4 bedroom $550 

PENNINGTON BOROUGH, expanded colonial 
walk to village, shopping, and school, delightful 
kitchen with breakfast room, spacious living room 
with fireplace, formal dining room, den four 
bedrooms, 2'/, baths Immaculate condition 

$108,500 



CAREER WORKSHOP In The sp,rl. of 

begins soon Weekly meetings designed 
to help you decide where you went to go 



KH^SBBIUBBfllflK^HBBKU^Bil^Hla^BSBI^I^I 



PRATIQUEZVOTREFRANCAISI 

tous renselgnemenrs sppelei s 
Group* Francophone" 




REAL ESTATE 

Anne S Stockton Broker 



Barbara P. Broad 
Ann T. Rose 
Thornton S. Field, Jr. 
Clotide S. Treves 



Lorraine E. Garland 
Margaret D. Siebens 
Katharine Garland 
Cornelia Reader 




Take pleasure in the passing of the seasons in this 
beautifully kept and easy to maintain colonial with 
four bedrooms, two and one half baths, study, full 
basement, and an enchanting garden. Close to the 
New York bus and in a quiet neighborhood, this 
house has the added charm of a year round 
garden roomi $170,000 



PRINCETON TOWNSHIP 

Walk to town or Community Park You must see it 
. to believe what's inside 1 Four bedrooms, one full 
and 2 half baths - living room, dining room, study 
and kitchen. Asking $125,000 



Donald Bartusis 
Lorraine Bo ice 
Larry Collins 
Sheila Cook 
Ted David 
Jo Ann Dv.ii lei 
Barbara Ellis 
Harriet Eubank 
Betsey Hardin): 
Mary Ann Harmu 
Charles Hurford 



(OOK 

ESTABLISHED 1893 

REALTORS 

P.O. Box t>85 • 350 Alexander Street 
Princeton, N.J. 08540 

609-924-0322 

A COMPLETE REAL ESTATE ORGANIZATION 



MarjorieKerr 
Ted Kopp 
Klnabeth U 
Joan Ouai kriilni'li 
Cecily Ron 
Ralph Snyder 
i Diane llnruh 
Not. Wilmot 
DeeWUnon 
Tin. Woodruff 




QUAKER ROAD 

A brick ranch set amid evergreens and 
flowering trees that almost hide It from view 
.... It's beautifully decorated and carefully 
maintained! Both the living room and the 
dining area are bright and sunny; the den 
leads to the screened porch ; the kitchen has 
been newly papered; there are 3 bedrooms 
and 2 baths. $87,500 



CARTER ROAD 

Many large and lovely trees shelter and 
shade this handsome ranch In Lawrence. The 
living room has a bluestone fireplace, triple 
windows, and a dlning-el leading to the 
private back yard. The family room is 
panelled and has built-in book cases. There 
are 3 bedrooms and 2 baths. 

$100,000 





^ 




Air* 


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1 




1 ***■ ^^SttW 







HAMILTON AVENUE 

This well landscaped house Is In a very 
friendly section of Princeton Borough, has 
just been repainted, and lacks only a buyer! 
It has a private back yard, 3 bedrooms, 2 
baths, and even a fireplace! $115,000 




STATE ROAD 

This unusual split-level house should appeal 
to you Immediately! The entry has a han- 
dsome oak floor; the living room has a 
fireplace and large window; there's a 
screened porch adjacent to the dining room; 
and the kitchen Is delightful! Upstairs are 4 
bedrooms and 2 baths. Asking $120,500 




This immaculate "Longmeadow" colonial Is 
in move-in condition. There are 4 bedrooms, 
a large center hall, a family room and much 
more. For the artistic eye, there Is 
magnificent wallpapering and lovely fixtures 
all included in our price. A commuter can 
appreciate gas saving too, for the train is 
only a few minutes' walk away! Best of all : It 
offers Immediate occupancy! $105,900 



TALL TIMBERS DRIVE 

Graceful trees attract the eye to this custom - 
built ranch - It's delightful on the Inside too! 
The entry hall has a handsome quarry-tile 
floor; the living room and the stone-floored 
library each have a fireplace! In addition, 
there is a dining room, kitchen, study, 2 
bedrooms, a lavatory, and 2 full baths. A 
large raised patio overlooks the refershlng In- 
ground pool. If you enjoy entertaining, you'll 
want this house! $175,000 



amwamwiwwimaTasmWAW^^^ nm «■ lumyij i m mwi 



rauran f ww««»'»»" j « Jil l 



WOODSY SETTING IN HOPEWELL TOWNSHIP lor this two bedroom 
"doll house." This house has been completely gutted and rebuilt Walls 
and ceilings and floors have been insulated Windows, doors, interior 
and exterior walls, rool, electrical plumbing, bathroom and kitchen are all 
new Ideal lor a small family. 

Offered at $68,500 

HOPEWELL TOWNSHIP, live bedroom. 2V, bath colonial with Municipal 
Sewers on 1 5 acres Family room with fireplace, formal dining room, 
kitchen with breakfast area, laundry room, full basement. 15x12 wood 
deck, two car attached garage Approximately 2400 square feet of living 
area 

$117,500 

StonYBrook 



3MANUSCRIPTTYPINO 



SOFA BED FOR MUl flood qu*)ity, 
queen sue mattre« Call m 7101 after 



35 WEST BROAD STREET ^REALTY 

HOPEWELL. NEW JERSEY 08525 
(609)466-0900.737-9150 CARMEN R MANZONI. GRl IFA 
or Don Hickson, 466-1135 




Priced to sell quickly is this 4 or 5 bedroom 
home m Princeton location Lovely formal dining 
room with dramatic floor and french doors to 
Williamsburg garden. Utilize 5 rooms and bath on 
first floor as your needs dictate Call Marpry White 
to see this soon $163,900 



Location is the key to this Princeton Borough 
home. Built to last with plaster walls, real pine 
paneling, 2 tile baths, full basement and low 
maintenance exterior siding Watch the world from 
the cozy front porch, $139,500 





Do You Know Where This House Is? Its not too 

late to see this contemporary in private, secluded 
location, yet close to town. 2 heatolater fireplaces, 
thermopane windows, both study and family 
room, decks and much more. $250,000 



Conservative Contemporary ...thermopane 
windows and woodbuming stove in addition to 
regular heating system. Beautiful view from full 
deck to woods and nieghboring pond. $1 33,500 





Hillside Ranch .... complete lower level for at- 
tractive guest quarters or family room area. 
Beautifully maintained and decorated home in Elm 
Ridge Park suitable for the discerning buyer who 
appreciates a fine neighborhood of substantial 
homes with the convenient location and excellent 
schools Available at $173,500 



Sourland Mountain View from our excellent 4 
Bedroom Colonial in the Willowmede Tradition A 
best buy in today's market sure to delight all the 
family members $123,900 



REALTY WORLD 



AUDREY SHOOT 

163 Nassau Street, Princeton, N J. 921-9222 
2431 Main St., Lawrenceville, N J. 896-9333 



I* 


SHED HOUSE FOR RENT. 

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PEYTON ASSOCIATES REALTORS 



Tuesday and Thun 



C.J. Skillman Co. 

Furnrture Repairing 

Upholstery 



924-0221 
3 Spring Slreel 



JAMES V. TAMASI 

Plumbing & Healing 

Contractor 

Princeton Junction, N.J 

799-1494 



e FABRICS 

e DRAPERIES 

e SLIPCOVERS 

• FURNITURE 
REPAIR6 

DEWEY'S 

Upholstery Shop 

S-8 Station Drive 

Princeton Junction tlBWr j 

799-J77B 



NOW RENTING 
PRINCETON ARMS 

Luxury Apartments 
1 and 2 Bedrooms 

From $280 Per Month 

Features: 

Wall-to- Wall carpeting over 
concrete in 2nd floor apts. 
all utilities except Electric 
Individually controlled heat 
2 air conditioners 
Private entrances * 
Walk-in closets 
Individual balconies 
Storage room within apt. 
Laundry Rooms 
Superintendent on site. 

Open Mon. — Fri. 

9 a.m. -5 :00 p.m. 

609-448-4801 

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REAL ESTATE 

10 NASSAU STREET 

PRINCETON, NEW JERSEY 08S40 

Phone: (609) 921-1411 



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NEW PRINCETON BOROUGH HOUSE - FOR SALE OR RENT 

A superbly located, brand-new house. Walk to the University or mid- 
town shopping. The house is traditionally Colonial in style, has a 
well-proportioned living room opening from the entrance area, 
dining room, informal family room next to kitchen, or fourth 
bedroom with brick fireplace and adjoining powder room. The 
second floor includes a master bedroom with dressing area, large 
walk-in closet and private bath. There are two other family 
bedrooms and a full bath. An exceptional value at $135,000, also 
available for rent - $700 per month. 



INVESTMENT PROPERTIES 

Princeton Borough - Double house, a two bedroom, one bath, living 
room with dining area, kitchen and basement each side. 

$18,500 per side. 

Princeton Township - Good sized apartment complex with office 
and commercial possibilities. $325,000 

Pennington Borough - Fine investment, the building ideal for home 
and professional use. $99,500 




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CHARMING OLDER HOUSE IN WELL ESTABLISHED HIGHT- 
STOWN NEIGHBORHOOD 

This comfortable, well maintained house is located within walking 
distance of town on an oversized beautifully treed lot. 

The house contains a living room, paneled den, formal dining 
room, eat-in all-electric kitchen, laundry room, powder room and 
screened and carpeted porch. Upstairs are four bedrooms and bath. 
The basement contains a large paneled rec room with bar. 

An excellent buy at $92,500 



NEARBY CRANBURY 

A charming country property of 7.2 acres, absolutely superb for 
the horse owner. There is an excellent show barn with six box 
stalls and fine tack room. 

The house itself is practically new ( 1973) ; - it is a spacious 
traditional home with many fine features. The formal living room 
has a fireplace, the dining room opens to a large solarium, there is 
a large family room, panelled, with fireplace and bay window. 
Upstairs are four bedrooms and three full baths. 

An unusual offering, convenient to commuting as well as 
Princeton, - and a superb value at $219,000 

NEARBY PLAINSBORO TOWNSHIP 

Down a long lane of fine old trees is a charming farm house built in 
1798. This is historically documented and makes a most fascinating 
and unusual offering. 

The property is three acres of broad lawns, handsomely wooded 
with specimen maples, chestnut, and walnut trees. The house, 
having been maintained beautifully, consists of formal living and 
dining rooms, a nice study with fireplace, a cool and spacious 
screened porch, a country kitchen and pantry shed. Upstairs are two 
wings, each of two bedrooms and bath. "Financing available from 
owner to qualified buyer". 

This property of special interest is available at $135,000 



RENTAL 

Kingsway Commons - 3 bedrooms, 2>/ 2 bath townhouse, living room, 
family room with fireplace, kitchen and dining area. Energy saving 
heat and air conditioning. Available Oct. 1, Princeton address. 

$650 per month 

NEARBY MONTGOMERY TOWNSHIP 

This custom-designed house is situated in the rolling country side of 
large country estates just north of Princeton. Thoroughly con- 
temporary, this newly completed house has energy-saving features 
galore - double-glazed window walls, two zone heating and air- 
conditioning. The brick exterior is virtually maintenance free. 

A wide tiled entrance foyer leads to the magnificent sunken living 
room and a delightfully informal living room which overlooks the 
garden courtyard. The kitchen, designed for the gourmet cook, is 
lavish with counter-tops, storage space, and the latest of culinary 
aids. There are four bedrooms, four full baths, plus two powder 
rooms. 

A farm-land assessment increases the attraction of owning this 
fine country property. Our representatives will be happy to show you 

its many unusual features. 

$275,000 

Member Mercer County Multiple Listing Service 
Princeton Real Estate Group 



KING'S GRANT has a fine selection of Country Acreage. 



MONTGOMERY TOWNSHIP 

5.4 acres beautifully wooded acres. Lovely country retreat - with 
stream. Convenient - 10 minutes to Princeton, 5 minutes to Hopewell. 

$40,000 

Only minutes from Nassau Street, a Montgomery Township 
property of four acres would be perfect for an elegant country house. 
An excellent value at $75,000 

LAWRENCE TOWNSHIP, across from ETS, 37 acres prime, 
wooded residential land. $12,500 per acre 

HOPEWELL TOWNSHIP, 3 plus acres on Elm Ridge Road with one- 
story barn in excellent condition. Ideal building site. $65,000 



KING'S GRANT REAL ESTATE 

S. Serge Rizzo, Licensed Broker 
New Jersey and Pennsylvania 

10 Nassau St., Princeton, N.J. 
Phone 609-921-1411 



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Employment Opportunities throughout the Princeton Area 



S*tf m*s Smone Shop 
Center Slat. oners 



i Temporary in h 



HOPEWELL 



EAST WINDSOR 
Roma BaHery 

<ENDALL PARK 



LIVE IN HOUSEKE 


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SECRETARY: in 


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HELP WANTED - 


FULL TIME: IX 



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Career Counseling 

Service 

for Women 

Workshops 
Resumes 
Individual counseling 

Ema Grantier Tmbee, MA 

22 Chambers 924-3022 



Princeton Super 



sporlation Call I 



ESTATE SALES 



Complete 

Personnel Services 

BANNER BUSINESS 

Associates 

TEMP-PERM. 
PLACEMENTS 

228 Alexander St. 

(NuttuMdg.) 

924-4194 



NOTICE 

In compliance with a 
ruling of the Stale 
Supreme Court, all 
newspapers must ascer- 
tain that employment ads 
do not discriminate bet- 
ween sexes 

For example, titles 
such as "Salesman." 
"Nurse" and "Girl 
Friday" should be 
eplaced, respectively, 
by ' Salesperson,' Nur- 
se (M/W)" and "General 
Office Work M/W".- 
TOWN TOPICS has a 
copy of the Division of 
Civil Rights booklet. "A 
Guide for Employers to 
the New Jersey Law 
against Discrimination." 
and will provide 
assistance in the wor- 
ding of all such ads upon 
request Advertisers' 
cooperation is sought in 
meeting the requiremen- 
ts of the law 



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RESEARCH TECHNICIAN 



1 to 1 2K - creative, adaptable. 
Chemical background helpful 



609-924-9200 



Tuesday. Thursday i 



NASSAU 
PLACEMENTS 

■ by Bea Hunt 

Personalized placemen! 
or a// of/Vce personnel 



95N.»muSI 924-3716 



Ma/for/a M. Hamoty's 

PRINCETON 

EMPLOYMENT 

AGENCY 

Specializing in 
Temporary Help 
-Also- 
Permanent Placements in 

Secretarial, Clerical. 

Executive, EDP. Technical 

Sales 

No registration tee 

352 Nassau Street 

Princeton, NJ 

924-91 34 



BANKING POSITIONS 

TELLER TRAINEES; Good figure aptitude and appearance 
with pleasant manner. Experienced tellers always welcomed. 
CLERKS; Typing, filing, pleasant phone manner. 

PROOF MACHINE OPERATORS; Accuracy, dexterity, and 
flexibility. Hours 10 a.m.-6:30 p.m. or 1 1 a.m.-8 p.m. One part 
time opening 2 p.m.-8 p.m. three days per week. 

Your own transportation is necessary in all positions. 
Apply between 9-1 1 a.m., Personnel Office, 2nd Floor 



MEDICAL SECRETARY/ 
RECEPTIONIST 



First r 
required 



Busy Gyn Office 

typing skill) 



Apply 609-921-6040 
Mon. -Fri. 




ADVERTISING 
CLERK-TYPIST 

Here's one ol those rare op- 
portunities to "break into" a 
lascinatmg iieid' If you have 
good basic skills and thrive on 
people-contact, you'll enjoy 
mierestmg diversified duties 
(ranging from trallic 10 Special 
reports) Even better, you'll be 
working in the pleasant 
Princeton Office ol a statewide 
organization We olfer a good 
starting salary and excelleni 
benefits 

Call for an appomiment. 
Personnel Department 
609-921-6100. 

United Jersey 
Banks 






ELECTRONIC ASSEMBLY 

osilion in expanding production deparlmenl Musi 
be capable ol using hand tools for cable and chassis wiring 
Mechanical assembly and PC board wiring Contact Bob 



ENGINEERING TECHNICIAN 

__^ Challenging posilion in expanding engineering group lor 5? 
Q recent lech school grad, with t lo 2 years' experience General ||| 

I engineering support dulies lo include prololype. wiring || 
wrapping, debugging, special project assembly Opportunity lo *y. 
learn and grow with the latest technology, loi right individual 2S 
Competitive salary and excellent company benefits Contact 111 
Gary Schnerr. 

ACCOUNTS PAYABLE 

II Looking lor person lo process all company invoicing and U 
JJ various other duties Musi have previous accou is Q 

accounting expenence be dependal e sell have || 

good aililude Salary commensurali Call II 

April, ext 237 II 

SENIOR TECHNICIAN 

Tech school grad with experience to provide technical support 
^ lor various groups Oulies include computer and peripherals, 
Q special hardware repairs along wilh general engineering 

D technician duties, such as bread boarding and wire wrapping 
Working knowledge ol data communications desired DEC 
computer experience a definite plus Salary commensurate 
Q with abilities and experience Contact Gary Schnerr. 

PRINCETON GAMMA TECH 

Washington Street 

Rocky Hill, N.J. 08553 

609-924-7310 

=XOI JOE 



Baoi 



PRINCETON BANK 



76 Nassau Street Princeton, N.J. 

Member HORIZON Bancorp 

Anerj. female 



Response Analysis Corporation 

P.O. Box 158 
PRINCETON. N.J. 08540 

DATA PROCESSING- SURVEY RESEARCH PROFESSIONAL 

Manage Development ol DATA BASE for Important U S Department ot 
Energy National Survey ol Residential Energy Consumption 

SPECIFIC DUTIES INCLUDE: 

Oesign ol O P Systems Management Data Editing Procedures, Scheduling ol Co-ordinalion ol 

Intern liana External Data Processing Activities. Liaison with DOE Computer Specialists 

e and Software Resources 'or Survey Data Editing and File 

SEND RESUME WITH DETAILED WORK EXPERIENCE 

AND SALARY REQUIREMENTS TO: 

Personnel Department 

Response Analysis Corporation 

P.O.Box 158 

Princelon. New Jersey 08540 

^^^^ An Equal Opportunity Employe/ 



TOWN TOPICS * 

fCLASSIFIED AD RATES 

$2 .00 for 20 words, per 
insertion 5c for each ad- 
ditional word Box number 
ads 50c extra Payment of 
ad within six days after 
publication saves 50c 
billing charge 

Cancellations must be 
made by 5 p.m. Monday; 
reorders by 5 p.m. 
Tuesday, the week of 
publication. 

Ads may be called in, 924 
2200. mailed to P.O Box 
664, Princeton, or brought'^ 
to the Town Topics office, 4 I 
Mfrcer Street. 





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cooking, parking, 2 minutes 1o campus. 
Call 91* **?* 


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TUTOR: with experience teachlr 
PDS & PHS. Offering study and 
position help In High School levc 
English and History. Call Ohyai 



everything. Call 



Quiet j TIRES FOR SALE: 
Allege, E -70's, with cregen, 
Ik to afterfip.m. 



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. 8EAUTIFULI Big 
ans Big Taxes and I 
acy. Consolidation? \ 



CANE CHAIRS: Need i 
Contractors. B82 7736. 



I 4 ACRES 



TUCKED IN 



amidst luscious trees and expansive lawns 
with a view overlooking the Delaware River 
and the New Jersey hills, this elegant 
traditional house offers 22 x 29' living room 
with Williamsburg wainscoting and french 
doors to flagstone patio, big sunny kitchen 
with eating area, 20 x 21' family room, 3 
bedrooms, beautiful dark oak floors, hand 
split cedar shake roof, and a place to keep 2 
ponies. Luxurious country living. $174,000 

_ _^__ ELIZABETH "^^^^ 

pMES 

M^mm ▼ COUNTRY REAL ESTATE 

I rSSL^F. ass. 215 794-7403 




' "'" ' r.v Sp •r-ia-ii* 1 * 

WEIDEL— The Name To Remember For Outstanding Service 



HOUSE FOR RENT 

Immediate occupancy, easy commute to 
N.Y., Princeton and North Jersey. 4 
bedroom 2'/s bath 2 story colonial with 
central air, all appliances, 2 car garage and 
great area $575 per month 





AWAY FROM THE MADDENING CROWDS 

In the quiet country atmosphere of 
GRIGGSTOWN, on a beautifully wooded lot at the 
end of a dead end street, sits our most interesting 
custom-built 3 bedroom, 2 bath ranch. The builder 
incorporated such really nice features as redwood 
deck overlooking the private woods, large rooms, 
brick fireplace, 10' ceiling in full basement, hot 
water baseboard heat and a great floor plan. A 
great buy at $89,900 



HIGH ON A HILLTOP 

Overlooking the western section of Princeton - 
and beyond, our custom built brick and frame 
ranch is a joy to see. With 3 bedrooms, 2'/i baths, 
a lovely Vermont marble fireplace in the living 
room, a brick fireplace in the large family room 
that affords a most pleasant view of the nicely 
landscaped acre, this is the perfect property for 
the family who cares about prime location. 

$114,900 

"PUBLIC HOUSE" - CIRCA 1848 

The history buffs, lovers of authentic colonial 
homes or people who want to live in one of the 
most charming properties around today must see 
this 4 bedroom, 1 M bath, 1 room delight. 
Recorded in the West Windsor and Lawrence 
Historical Records, the period of original con- 
struction was kept in mind when the owners 
recently remodeled. Such modern improvements 
as new electrical wiring and service, extra in- 
sulation, fabulous new kitchen with French tile 
counter and storms and screens enhance the 
value of this incredibly charming, professionally 
decorated property. The pine floors, beamed 
ceilings, built-in corner cabinets, brick breakfast 
room floor and some antique appointments make 
you feel you've never left the 1 9th century. 

Asking $149,900 




THE THEME IS QUALITY 

Although this energy efficient 3 bedroom, 2 bath 
ranch is only 1 Vi years-old, it was custom built 
with old world care incorporating such features as 
marble vanities, oak panelled family room with 
brick fireplace, bay window in living room and 
poured concrete full basement. This 1.97 acre 
property borders acres of untouched woodland for 
complete privacy. $159,900 



and turn this 4 bedroom cape on a nicely land- 
scaped 2 A acre lot in nearby South Brunswick into 
the best investment you ever made. There's a full 
basement, new roof, nice sized rooms and the 
location is convenient. Now is the time to make 
your handy work count. $55,700 



PROFESSIONAL OFFICE SPACE Building 
with 5 offices plus reception area. Partially 
furnished. Parking for 15 cars, V4 mile from 
Twin Rivers. Will rent per office basis for 
$1 00 per month . Total area $600 per month 



NORMA GREAVES - MANAGER 



Ruth Easley 
Donna Keating 



Paul Lavin 
Thomas McGann 



Theresa Ranft 
Freda Routh 



Cindy Sneddon 
Karin Wagner 



WEIDEL REAL ESTATE 



Interior & Exterior Color Photos 



242V4 NASSAU ST., PRINCETON, N.J. 

921-2700 



international Relocation service 



A CHOICE SELECTION 



THE CLASSIC PRINCETON IN-TOWN 
COLONIAL! Right from the Vermont slate roof 
down to the stone foundation, the gracious center 
hall colonial is just about perfect! Built in 1925, 
there's not even a settling crack in the solid plaster 
walls A spacious center hall with carved stairway 
leads to the living room with fireplace and French 
doors to a divine screened porch, inviting dining 
room, butler's pantry, good-sized kitchen and 
seasonal breakfast room overlooking the garden A 
powder room completes the high-ceilinged first 
floor A master suite with large bath is the highlight 
of the second floor, which also includes three other 
bedrooms, full hall bath and sewing nook! Fully 
floored attic houses the TV antenna ; full basement 
with laundry facilities and outside entrance, of 
course! One of the prettiest lots and properties in 
Princeton, all within walking distance of Nassau 
Street, the University and the Lake. Who could ask 
•for more? Top-notch condition, as any inspection 
will prove But don't take our word Please come 
see this exquisite listing for yourself. Call Ann 
Browertomakeadate. Just $179,500 



THIS IS THE BEST OF ALL POSSIBLE WORLDS ! 
A comfortable four bedroom colonial has been 
transformed by its imaginative owners into the 
perfect family house for today's living. A new 
contemporary wing with step-down family room 
with cathedral ceiling and walls of glass 
overlooking a beautiful view is absolutely splendid! 
It incorporates a fifth bedroom and a full bath, too ! 
The living room and library are tastefully 
decorated and the kitchen - dining room blends both 
for easy living! Situated on a cul-de-sac in Rocky 
Hill with a wooded lot and every convenience. 

$167,500 



THE BARN ... AN HISTORICAL TREASURE 
A MODERN ACHIEVEMENT ... the original 
barn from the Tulane Farm dating back 
through the 19th century Updated by imaginative 
restoration, the large foyer preserves the integrity 
with its antique strap hinges and early 1800 post and 
beam timbers The family room must be measured 
in cubic rather than linear footage and the massive 
chimney of old brick is executed in scale with the 
two-story ceiling. Sliding glass doors and custom 
windows* extend 14 feet upward to open the room to a 
deck and woods beyond. The kitchen features board 
and batten pine cabinets, stainless steel three- 
sectioned sink, gas range, double self-cleaning 
electric oven, trashmaster and many other custom 
highlights The dining room is large and bright with 
a WiBiamsbure flair. The formal living room 
complete with stone fireplace opens to a warm 
study with Vermont barn siding. Upstairs a balcony 
bridge spans the entrance hallway and separates 
the two sleeping areas. On one side the master suite, 
dressing room and full bath is secluded. On the 
other, are three double-sized bedrooms and hall 
bath plus a guest room with private access at the 
bridge. Built-ins, air conditioning, and much more 
. all on a lovely piece of nearby property with a 
Princeton address. Please call Virginia Ja'ydel for 
details. 



SHADES OF SCARLETT O'HARA . . A spacious 
newer-style 5-bedroom, 3^4 bath Southern Colonial 
distinctive for a variety of environments! A rich, 
dark oak adult entertainment room with beautiful 
built-in custom cabinets, bookshelves, desk, sit- 
down bar and mood lighting, a family room with a 
raised hearth fireplace, a first floor bedroom (den 
or library'') with complete bath; great hobby shop 
and darkroom; teen-style hideaway; spacious 
formal living room with huge bay window and 
fireplace; plus much more A home proudly 
displayed in a wooded setting across from a park- 
like property in Princeton's desirable Riverside 
section near sailing on Lake Carnegie, schools and 
buses A home to really enjoy the Princeton ex- 
perience $198,500 




JOHNT 



Hopewell 

Hopewell House Square 
Hopewell, New Jersey 08525 
[609] 466-2550 



INC 



^HENDERSON 

REALTORS^^ 

4 Charlton Street, Princeton, New Jersey 08540 [609] 921-2776 



West Windsor 

Princeton-Hightstown Road 

Cranbury, NJ 08512 

[609] 799-4500 



. . . HENDERSON, OF COURSE! 





OUR NEWEST DODDS LANE LISTING IS A GEM. ..just the right size for most 
of today's living, in meticulous condition, and ready to be moved into! Eighteen 
years young on a heavily wooded lot on Dodds Lane, with central air and a 
comfortable floor plan affording living room, dining room, eat-in kitchen and 
panelled family room with fireplace and access to the yard. Three large 
bedrooms, two of which are richly panelled, and two full baths. A finished 
basement recreation room with lots of storage and a great workshop area, too. 
Two-car garage and all for $167,500. Open House today. 



HERE'S AN IDEAL HOUSE FOR ALMOST EVERYBODY! The price is right, 
the neighborhood's lovely, the location is super. ..with a touch of town and 
country! In Penn View Heights with Hopewell Schools, this spacious 3-bedroom, 
2 bath ranch ofers lots of space among the living room-fireplace, dining room 
and eat-in kitchen with lovely cabinets and convenient island ! There's a family 
room besides which opens via sliding doors to a marvelous slate-floored, 
cathedral-ceilinged glass-enclosed porch. It's almost an all-weather room. 
There's also a finished recreation room in the basement. Just painted on the 
outside and ready for almost immediate occupancy. $135,000 




IN PRINCETON WITH IMMEDIATE OCCUPANCY is this four bedroom, two 
and one half bath home that has been freshly painted on the inside. Many extras 
include centra] air conditioning, fireplace, electronic air cleaner and fantastic 
storage and closet space throughout all on a magnificent wooded lot. Call us 
today to see this great buy at $147,9 00 




DO YOU LIKE A HOME WITH SPACE WHERE EVERYONE'S ACTIVITIES 
CAN BE SEPARATE? Then this is it! 4 bedrooms, 2 baths, living room, dining 
room, family room, den, solarium and screened porch on the first floor. 2 extra 
bedrooms with built-ins on 2nd floor. For the active housewife an easy to run 
compact kitchen. A great family house with room for everyone where everyone 
has room. Brick & frame construction on a 'k acre landscaped and treed lot. 
Just a brisk walk from Princeton Junction. For the energy conscious commuter 
who does not want to spend more than $82,500 - and this includes a 1-year 
homeowner's warranty. 



A DREAMY NEW LISTING FOR ANTIQUE BUFFS! Here is the absolutely 
perfect setting for your treasured possessions. ..not to mention yourself. A 
landmark property in the quaint village of Cranbury. Living room with carved 
mantel, formal dining room, country kitchen with brick wall, laundry room, 
powder room, three bedrooms plus master room with fireplace. A sunny library 
overlooks Cranbury Lake. And, of course, there's a charming brick terrace 
surrounded by Holly trees and boxwood. All on a small lot and just a short walk 
from the picket fence to shopping. Asking $164,000 




PRINCETON BOROUGH. FIVE ROW HOUSES, GOOD INVESTMENT! Each 
unit has living room, dining room, kitchen, three bedrooms and bath. 
Aluminum siding; garage, within walking distance to Nassau Street, the "Y" 
and Community Park. Call for details. 

BR 




EXCELLENT VALUE IN PRINCETON! Totally renovated with new wiring, 
all new appliances, new professional landscaping, within walking distance to 
the Community Park, here is a brick and aluminum sided, maintenance-free 
Cape Cod with three full baths, two compact kitchens, four bedrooms, fireplace, 
garage, and much more. Great for one family with two or three generations or 
really super for the investor, because it includes a Township-approved "flat". 
Please see this good buy. $127,500! 



THIS GRACIOUS PRINCETON COLONIAL HIGH ON A HILL with two+ acres 
comes complete with swimming pool, tennis court and exquisite landscaping 
Of course, there are also three fireplaces, one in the master suite with dressing 
room and full bath, one in the panelled family room and one in the formal living 
room There's a cozy panelled study, too, for quiet moments. Great kitchen and 
two staircases. Three-car garage ... so you can see this offers a great deal of 
modern living space. Come see it for yourself. $295,000 



JOHNT 



Hopewell 

Hopewell House Square 
Hopewell, New Jersey 085^5 
[609] 466-2550 



^HENDERSON 

REALTORS^"* 

-> Charlton Street, Princeton, New Jersey 08540 [609] 921-2776 



West Windsor 



Princeton-Hightstown Road 

Cranbury, NJ 08512 

[609] 799-4500 



9 

. APARTMENT AVAILA* 

£ Thrm 1*9* roomj «no b*tn, 

»- C Vance to me University. MOO 1 

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walking 

deluding 


EPPICtBNCY APARTMENT tor rent 
3rd ftoor center of town. $1*5 ■ month 
Available Immediately Call 701 564 


S ONE ROOM: waiting dlst 
• University 1115 includes All win 

U ASSOCIATES REALTY 

O OF PRINCETON 


FOR SALE: Sola. Wild, comfortable. 


*•*-«*-*»> 


Sunday October 14. vtoSp m Antique*. 


z 

O YARD SALE 
* 




plckenion Street. Princeton 



Mary Watts 
Store 

Grocenes. Gasoline 

Fireplace Wood. Kindling 

Charcoal Briquets 

Open every day 

and evening 

Route 206, State Road 

Tel. 921-9866 



DID YOU KNOW? 

That We clean Some of 
The Most Unusual Things? 
Lamp Shades 

oriental rugs 
Needlepoint & petit point 
Fabnc covered shoes 
Stuffed animals & dolls 
PBows— recovered & renovated 
Leather amc'es (clean & dye) 
Poc*etboo*s & evening bags 
Cloth-type museum pieces 
Afghans 
Tyrolean shons 
Berets 

Banners & flags 
Sleeping bags 
Upholstered furniture 
Yes even your great-grand- 
mother's wedding, dresi- 







February, 
February 



IN MONTGOMERY TOWNSHIP 




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knotty pine country kitchen with fireplace 
another fireplace In living r oom. O nly $95 900 




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REALTY CO. OF PRINCETON, INC. 




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$139,900 




SUPER HOUSE and neighborhood located near Cranbury Golf Club Six bedrooms. 2V 2 baths, 
paneled family room with fireplace, dining room, huge kitchen with separate laundry Extra 
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INVESTMENT PROPERTY ... Brick Bldg in Lawrence Twp 1675 Sq Ft on 1st floor and a 
presently occupied 7 room apt on 2nd floor Adjacent to bldg. are 3 lots thai could expand 
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SUCCESSFUL RETAIL BUSINESS, located in high volume customer area Call Hilton for 
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NOW UNDER CONSTRUCTION - 5 bedroom Colonial Nice country setting. Close to bus and 
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FOR RENT: MONTGOMERY SHOPPING CENTER STORE Approximately 2700 Sq Ft - $4 00 
Per Sq. Fl per year net, net. Call 924-6551 

HOUSES FOR RENT at $850 per month 

HOUSES FOR RENT in Lawrence Township Immediate occupancy. Call Hilton for further 
details 

RENTALS: HOUSES AND APARTMENTS 

MEMBER: 

Mercer and Somerset County MLS 

Princeton Real Estate Group 

Affiliated Independent Broker William Schuessler, 921-8963 Asa G. Mowery 395-1671 

(Nationwide Referral Service) Harvey Rude, 201-359-5327 Dorothy Oppenheim, 924-3923 

921-finfin !!',!" M ^ f ?°' i$ FriederikeCoor, 921-0460 

,\'° c. Allen D'Arcy, 799-0685 Emma King, 799-1694 

Hmonmdo 2ndl D r «-s Edmonds, 201-449-9357 Marilyn Creasy, 201-297-5110 

Hilton Bldg., 2nd floor Jim Ajamian, 466-1 592 



Open 7 days a week. 
Evenings & Weekends Call: 




Mayoralty Candidates, Differing on Consolidation, Both Feel 
That the Issue Is Not an Integral Part of Current Campaign 



Borough voters choose a 
mayor every four years. The 
ma^or is elected directly, and 
oeparately from members of 
Council, in contrast to the 
situation in the Township. 

This year. Republican 
Robert W. Cawley is seeking 
his third four-year term. He 
k was first elected in 1969 when 
borough mayors in New 
Jersey served for two years. 
The law was changed, and 
when he won re-election in 
1971 and 1975, it was for four- 
year terms. 

His challenger is Democrat 
Robert McChesney, a 
newcomer to elective office 
but a Borough resident who 
has been active in community 
affairs, especially in regard to 
rent control and development 
of Quarry Park, 

The candidates are on op- 
posite sides of the con- 
solidation question: Mr. 
Cawley supports consolidation 
■ ii 'id Mr. McChesney opposes 
it. 

Although Mr. McChesney 
acknowledges that one of the 
first questions voters ask is 
"How do you feel about 
consolidation?" he hopes 
today, as he did when he 
declared his views late in the 
summer, that he can keep his 
candidacy and the con- 
solidation issue separate, and 
he declined to discuss the 
question in the interview that 
follows. 

Mr. Cawley has also found 
that "the number one issue" 
among voters is consolidation, 
but he also tries to keep it in 
the background. Both can- 
didates point out that voters 
themselves will make the 
consolidation decision, and 
that it is technically not linked 
to the political campaign. 

"I do have an interest in 
consolidation," Mr. Cawley 
,»ys, "and I would like to be 
involved, either way. If it is 
defeated, there are some 
things wejiave put off doing 
that need to be done, like re- 
structuring the Planning 
Board, for example, to make it 
smaller, with alternate 
members." 

Challenger Rob McChesney 
says, "A new eye can suggest 
possible solutions to problems, 
As a community, we face the 
need, over the next 10 to 25 
years, for careful, thrifty use 
of our resources: people's 
, time and money, the land, 
trees. I have new ideas, an 
unincumbered approach." 

Incumbent Bob Cawley 
says, "The real issue is what 
the candidate has to offer. I'm 




Republican Robert VV. Cawley 

running because the down- 
town. Central Business 
District project won't be 
finished in '79 and I want to 
see it through. If you've been 
in office, you have experience 
and expertise." 

Coherent Plan Possible. "I 

see the need for expansion of 
commercial and housing 
space downtown," Mr. Cawley 
continued. "We have a chance 
very few towns have -- to 
make a really coherent plan. 
The Borough owns some of the 
land, and most of the rest 
belongs to only one owner 
(Palmer Square, Inc.). With 
only two owners, you are in a 
position to develop a com- 
prehensive plan. 

"But the magnitude of the 
task! Lots of things still 
remain to be done that it was 
too early to think of before: 
fringe parking, ride-sharing, 
organizing employers, finding 
ways to do it all equitably; for 
example, people who need 
cars for valid business 
reasons should be allowed to 
park in the CBD." 

Mr. McChesney has a three- 
part plan which he says will 
provide an additional 800 to 
900 parking spaces within five 
to eight minutes' walk of 
Palmer Square. 

"The heart of the plan," he 
explains, "is to repeal the two- 
hour parking limit during 
business hours on streets 
adjacent to the CBD. Then, we 
must crack down on meter- 
feeders, and reduce the size of 
half the existing parking 
spaces to accommodate small 
cars. I estimate about 170 
more spaces could be created 
this way." 

Mr. Cawley disagrees with 



Democrat Robert McChesney 

the heart of the McChesney 
plan. 

"It's not acceptable to the 
residential character of the 
community to remove the two- 
hour restriction on residential 
street," hestated. 

Housing and rent control are 
McChesney concerns. He says 
he will work for a revised rent 
control ordinance because he 
does not believe the present 
one is very effective for either 
tenant or landlord. 

A landlord's allowable in- 
crease is now pegged to in- 
flation through the Consumer 
Price Index, but the CPI also 
reflects such items as food 
increases, Mr. McChesney 
points out. He believes that 
tying rent levelling to some 
other index might be better, 
and he does not like the $400-a- 
month ceiling in the present 
ordinance. No landlord should 
be "priced out of business," he 
explains, "but saying a lan- 
dlord is entitled to a 
reasonable return is like 
guaranteeing a store a certain 
level of profit." 

Basically, he thinks the 
ordinance is important 
because it shows that local 
government is concerned 
about renters. 

Mr. Cawley would prefer no 
rent control, and he believes 
the present ordinance has 
been a "placebo," with 
relatively little effect. 

"In the early days of the 
ordinance, at least," he says, 
"there were rent increases 
higher than they would have 
been without it. We looked at 
the issues just before the law 
was extended and my con- 
clusion was that landlords 
hadn't been hurt much. It was 



vhat tenant at- 



Outside Funds Needed. 
Challenger McChesney 
doesn't think the Borough has 
assiduously pursued Federal 
or state moneys: "The 
Township is better oriented to 
getting outside funds," he 
commented. 

' The First Aid Squad seerr^ 
a perfect spot to ask fur 
Federal or state money, 
perhaps from Civil Defense," 
he proposed. "Maybe Venturi 
and Rauch (CBD consultants) 
might have been paid with 
outside money." 

He points to two HUD Block 
Grant applications he 
prepared for the Borough 
(Quarry Park and renovation 
of public housing) , and 
charges there was never any 
follow-up to other sections of 
each grant. 

"The Borough just hasn't 
done enough to seek outside 
money," he declared. 

Since Borough Council has 
had a Democratic majority 
for some time, Mr. 
McChesney was asked how his 
criticism could be directed at 
the Republican mayor. It was 
a question of leadership, he 
replied. 

Warning of "a real budget 
crunch this year," Mr. Cawley 
said "The budget-tax problem 
is as difficult as any we're 
going to have." 

He would like the state- 
imposed "cap" on the budget 
tied to a flexible indicator like 



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Tuesdays 7:00 p.m. 
For more information: (609) 799-1863 




We have the pleasure of offering an extensive 
selection of giftware and beautiful home accent 
pieces. ..all of fine craftsmanship, unique styling 
and affordable prices. 



The CHRISTMAS SHOP will be opening at the end of the month. 
Come in and browse. ..watch us trim a tree. 



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9241822 



Mixed Reception for Play Pitting Joan of Arc 
Against the Nazis as McCarter Season Begins 



16.50 STILL BUYS 




BALLET 

MODERN DANCE 

MODERN JAZZ 

THE 

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ItfTINGSHilD AT UNITARIAN CHURCH Th 

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1 Oct 14: The March -Washington, DC 




PRE-SEASON 
COAT SALE! 

UP TO 
50% OFF 

SHEEPSKIN COATS 
AND JACKETS 

A.VTARTEX Sheepskin Shops: Princeton. N. J., 4-6 Hul/iah Street 



Aidmore: Suburban Square Shopping Center, St. Georges Road 



Plauhousc 

Princeton! on palmer square 



ANOTHER REVIVAL WEEK: 

COMEDY TONIGHT 

THURS.-FRI.-SAT. OCTOBER 11-12-13 

John Barrymorefr Judy Holliday, William 

Carole Lombard Holden & Broderick 

n Howard Hawks' Crawford in 



TWENTIETH 
CENTURY 



comedies' Barrymore mak« 
Lombard a star then tries 
woo her bac* aboard cros 



BORN 
YESTERDAY 

Directed by George Cukor 8 
Written by Garson Kamr 
Junk-deaier-made-good Craw 



SUN.-WED., OCTOBER 14-17 



THE MARX BROS. 

A NIGHT AT 
THE OPERA 

/ou doubt 



KATHARINE HEPBURN 
& SPENCER TRACY 

in 

PAT b MIKE 

Directed by George Cukor 
Hepburn is Pat top female 
jock and Tracy her manager in 
. ' on dim to Adams 



FREE 
PARKING 



With an eye-filling, ear- 
tihng production of a 1940's 
play about a poor French girl 
who dreams she is Joan of Arc 
and tries to imitate the Maid 
in action against invading 
Nazis, the McCarter theatre 
Company last week opened its 
1979-80 season and introduced 
its new Producing Director, 
Nagle Jackson. 

To put the positive first, 
John Jensens single setting 
for "The Visions of Simone 
Machard" by Bertolt Brecht 
and Lion Feuchtwanger is 
breathtakingJy convincing in 
its massive recreation of the 
spacious courtyard between 
an expensive restaurant and 
its garages and gasoline pump 
in Saint-Martin. Its stone 
walls and steps are ancient 
and grimy, its atmosphere 
grim. (Mr. Jensen, says the 
program, is now on the 
McCarter staff as principal 
designer. Good.) 

Robert Morgan's costumes 
are many and colorful as 
Simone alternates between 
drab, threatening reality and 
a dazzling dreamworld in 
which her town's spineless 
mayor becomes a simpering 
King of France, her haughty 
employers and other 
collaborationists become 
breast-plated or brilliantly be- 
gowned persecutors, and her 
fellow restaurant workers are 
brave spear-carriers in her 
march to liberate France. 
John McLain, a McCarter 




invaded by an Angel. With brother, killed at the front - 

Simone alone in the courtyard, who in mostly rhymed 

a roof section ingeniously couplets urges her to summon 

opens up and there stands a up the actions of a tiger named 

handsome young man, all in Joan. 

off-white, with feathery white What dramatic steam has 
wings - apparently Simone's 



LA GUERRE 
EST FINIE 



News Of Tlw 
THEATRES 



regular, lights the 

proceedings admirably as 
always. 

The actors - including 
Princeton's own Karl Light as 
a cowardly French colonel, 
Anne Sheldon as Simone's 
mother, Sallie Brophy as a 
hungry refugee - are well 
chosen and attractive. 

The director - Mr. Jackson 
himself - is clearly a man of 
talent and imagination. But in 
telling him this play, thus 
produced, would be a good 
opener for his McCarter 
producing directorship, his 
imagination double-crossed 
him. 

"Visions," conceived by the 
propagandist-fantasist Brecht 
but largely written by the 
novelist Feuchtwanger, is, as 
here produced, a self- 
defeating blend of familiar, 
simplistic fact and spec- 
tacularly overblown fancy. A 
more modest treatment might 
have helped give it the 
seamless unity a play needs in 
order to gather momentum 
and work its magic. (One 
reason we are lucky to have 
the McCarter program is that 
even an unsatisfying 
production by talented people 
raises intriguing, debatable 
questions.) 

The play begins 

realistically: a wounded 
soldier and other restaurant 
workers are talking in the 
courtyard. Simone, who 
should be minding her laun- 
dry, is engrossed in a book 
about Joan of Arc, which has 
been giving her disturbing 
dreams. 

We meet the greedy young 
restaurant owner, glimpse the 
cowardly colonel, and learn 
that the Nazis have bypassed 
the Maginot Line and are 
headed this way The French 
army is virtually immobilized 
by refugees crowding the 
roads and beginning to flow 
into Saint-Martin. 

Then what has been a rather 
talky and conventional but 
potentially dramatic scene is 



McCarter Theatre Company) 

presents a Bertolt Brecht East Coast Premiere! 




't " ..ifcr 
VlSIOMS Of 

Simone Machard 



October 2-21 



The play tells the story of 
a French girl who, during 
the Nazi occupation of her 
homeland, dreams of Joan 
of Arc, sees comparable 
visions, and suffers a 
comparable fate. 






by Bertolt Brecht 

and Lion Feuchtwanger 

directed by Nagle Jackson 

••• 

Nagle Jackson's premiere at the Milwaukee 
Repertory Theater was hailed as "one of the 
10 best plays of the 1975-76 season." 

— National Observer 
••• 



Single Tickets and Season 
Subscriptions on Sale Now 
at McCarter Theatre Box 
Office (609) 921-8700 



Curtain Going Up!! 



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CURRENT CINEMA 

Titles and Times of Listings Subject to Change 

GARDEN THEATRE. 924-0263: Breaking Away, Wed & 
Thurs 7:35,9:30; Fri. & Sat. 7:45. 9:45; matinee Sat l;Sun 
2. 3:55.5:50.7:45. 9: 40; Mon.-Thurs 7:35,9:30 

PRINCETON PLAYHOUSE. 924-0180: Double Feature. 
Thurs , 20th Century. 7:30. and Born Yesterday, 9; Fri. & 
Sat 20th Century. 8. Born Yesterday. 9:30; Sat.-Wed. Night 
at the Opera. 7:30. Pat and Mike. 9 

MONTGOMERY THEATRE. 924-7444: Double Feature. 
Wed 4 Thurs , Bell Jar. 7: 15. and Old Boyfriends, 9: 15; Fri. 
& Sat . Let's Talk About Men, 7, 10:20, and All Screwed Up. 
8:40; Sun. All Screwed Up. 5:40. 8:10; Let's Talk About 
Men, 7:30; Mon St Tues. Jacob the Liar. 7:15. and La 
Guerre Est Flnie. 9. 

PRINCE THEATRE. 452-2278: Theatre I, Apocalypse Now. 
Fri. & Sat. 5:15, 8. 10:45; matinee Sat. 1; Sun. 1:45,4:25,7, 
9:35; Mon -Thurs. 7, 9:35; Theatre II. Time After Time. Fri. 
6, 10; Sat. 1, 6, 8, 10; Sun. 1:45, 3:45, 5:45. 7:45, 9:45; Mon- 
Thurs. 7:30,9:30; Theatre III, Life of Brian. Fri & Sat 5:45, 
7:30, 9:15, 11, matinee Sat. 1; Sun 2:30, 4:15, 6, 7:45, 9; 
Mon.-Thurs. 7:30. 9: 15. 

MERCER MALL CINEMA, 452-2868: Cinema I, Wed. & 
Thurs The Legacy, 1:30, 3:30, 5:30, 7:30, 9:45; beginning 
Friday and daily thereafter, Rock 'n Roll High School, 1:30, 
3:30, 5:30, 7:30, 9:30; Cinema II, Rocky II, daily 2, 4:30, 7, 
9:30; Cinema III, 10, daily 1, 3:10, 5:20, 7:40, 10. 

QUAKER BRIDGE MALL, 799-9331: Theatre I, beginning 
Friday, Rust Never Sleeps, Fri. & Sat . 4 : 45, 7, 9 : 15 ; matinee 
Sat. 2:30; Sun. 1, 3:15, 6:15, 8:30; Mon.-Thurs. 6:15, 8:30; 
Theatre II, The Muppet Movie, Fri. & Sat. 4:30, 6:30,8:15, 
matinee Sat. 2; Sun. 1,3,6,8; Mon.-Thurs. 6,8; Theatre III, 
Seduction of Joe Tynan. Fri. & Sat. 5:30, 8, 10:15; matinee 
Sat. 2:30; Sun. 1, 3:15, 6:15, 8:30; Mon.-Thurs. 6:15, 8:30; 
Theatre IV, Starting Over, Fri. & Sat. 5:15, 7:45, 10:15; 
matinee Sat. 2: 15; Sun. 1, 3:15, 6, 8: 15; Mon.-Thurs. 6, 8: 15. 



LAWRENCEVILLE, 882-9494: Eric I, Double Feature, 
Harold and Maude and King of Hearts, call theatre for 
times; Eric II, When a Stranger Calls, daily 7:30, 9:30; 
matinee Wed. 4 Sat 1. matinee Sun. 1:30.3:30.5:30. 



McCARTER'S NEXT 
"All the Way Home." An 
adaptation of James Agee's 
novel, 'A Death in the 
Family," McCarter Theatre's 
next play was a Pulitzer Prize- 
winner (1961) described by 
McCarter as "haunting and 
beautiful." 

The play's title is "All the 
Way Home." and it was 
adapted by playwright Tad 
Mose! from Agee's book It is 
the story of a young and loving 
family which loses one of its 
members, and those who have 
seen the play report that the 
subject of death is treated 
with gentle humor, com- 
passion and honesty. 

"Like the process of trans- 
lating from one language to 
another, adaptation aims at 
preserving the spirit rather 
than the literal substance," 
Mr. Mosel has said. "My task 
in All the Way Home' was to 
reveal in stage terms what 
Agee was saying in poetic 



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McCarter Review 



been generated up to that 
point quickly escapes in a 
cloud of theatricality. Oh, we 
knew she would hear voices, 
see visions; but somehow 
nothing prepared us for an 
angel so handsome and 
substantial. Her fellow- 
workers appear in armor with 
spears and banners and there 
is much marching-in-place, 
which struck us as stagey and 
not very dream-like. 

Young Simone -- ably played 
by Leslie Geraci -- whom we 
might have felt for, without all 
the theatrical hocus-pocus, 
becomes a puppet 

manipulated by authors and 
production. Unsurprisingly, 
the Nazis arrive, the 
collaborationists fawn, 
Simone commits an heroic act 
of sabotage. 

Though in general the 
characters are stereotypes, 
there is a German soldier 
(Michael Plunkett) who 
establishes rapport with his 
wounded French counterpart 
(Stephen Mendillo) over bad 
cigarettes and a mutually 
acceptable four-letter 
definition of war, and gives us 
one of the few real-life, real- 
people moments in an 
otherwise pretty lifeless 
charade. 

Simone has other visitations 
from the angel and other over- 
produced dreams including 
one in which collaborationists 
and Nazis in armor-plated 
wheel chairs play a game with 
outsize playing cards, another 
in which Simone is judged by 
enormous, cardinal-cloaked 
men on built-up shoes, whose 
endless echoing of one 
another's words becomes 
tiresome. (Are we to suppose 
Simone has been reading 
"Alice in Wonderland," too?) 
Their verdict and sentence we 
leave for you to discover. 

Credit Nagle Jackson with 
courage and determination. 
He knew the play suffered 
from a "disparity of styles," 
but he had done it successfully 
(less elaborately?) as director 
of the Milwaukee Repertory 
Theatre, and he wanted to 
open at McCarter with a 



rarely-produced work by, or 
half-by, a world-renowned 
dramatist, 

On the whole we are more 
en- than discouraged by the 
effort. Mr. Jackson has talents 
that, applied to sounder 
works, should delight us all. 
Weiook forward to the rest of 
his season with optimism 
undiminished. 

-William McCleery 



mmBBWxtt 



invites you to visit our 
new restaurant. 



Freshly prepared continental cuisine 

Special cocktail hours 4-7 p.m. in our lounge 

83 Princeton Ave.. Hopewell. N.J. 

■minutes from Princeton- 

Open weekdays for lunch. 
7 days for dinner 

(609)466-1700 



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You're Invited 



Every Sunday, from 

11:30 a.m to 2:30 p.m. 

the tables are set and 

waiting at the Nassau 

Inn, with beautiful, 

bountiful food at the 

Sunday Brunch 

Buffet. Come and join 

us. Let us tempt you 

with our best efforts. 

We want to serve you, 

to please you. 

$7.50, with children 

under 10, half price. 



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NASSAU INN 

Palmer Square. Princeton. NJ (609)921-7500 



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TO LUNCH 

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News of the Theatre* 

narrative terms." 

"All the Way Home" will 
preview October 30 through 
November 1, and will open 
Friday, November 2. The run 
will extend through November 



NASSAU 
LIQUORS 

<H Nniw SI. 
L m-M31 



CLARIDGE WINE 
& LIQUOR 

Wine and Champagne 
chilled while you watt 

m 3-5 minutes 



924-0657 — 924-570C 
FREE DELIVERY 



COMEDY TONIGHT! 
Groucho! Carole! A quartet 
of comedy film classics will be 
cycled into the Playhouse 
schedule starting this Thur- 
sday and continuing through 
next Wednesday 

"Twentieth Century," with 
Carole Lombard and John 
Barrymore, will team with 
"Born Yesterday," featuring 
Judy Holliday and Broderick 
Crawford Both belong to the 
"screwball comedy" genre, 
although they are about 20 
years apart. "Twentieth 
Century" was made in 1934, 
"Born Yesterday" in the 
1950s. 

The two films will play this 
Thursday, Friday and 
Saturday. They will be suc- 
ceeded Sunday through 
Wednesday, by "A Night at 
the Opera" and "" 
Mike." 



Discounts Available 
Theatre-goers at both 
ends of the age scale -- 
senior citizens and students 
-- can benefit from discount 
prices for McCarter 
Theatre tickets, the theatre 
announced this week. 

Senior Citizens Discount 
Night will be Sundays. 
Anyone 65 or older may buy 
a ticket for any Sunday 
performance in the drama 
series for half-price. You 
may reserve in advance, 
but you must pick up the 
ticket in person at the 
theatre's box-office. 
Reservations may be made 
at 921-8700 between noon 
and 6 p.m., Monday 
through Saturday. 

Students with a valid ID 
card will be able to buy two 
tickets per card, half an 
hour before curtain at $2.50 
each for any available seat 
in the house, any per- 
formance in the drama 
series. Included are junior 
high, senior high and 
college students. 



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GOOD M0N.. OCT. 15 & M0N., OCT. 22 
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One coupon per Adult dining couple 
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Open Daily 9 to 6; Saturday 9 to 4:30 



Jones will be remembered by 
Intime audiences as Troilus in 
"Troilus and Cressida," and 
by Princeton Inn Theatre 
audiences for his portrayal of 
Cosmo in "Mad Dog Blues." 
He is the winner of the 
Princeton University Class of 
1883 English Prize. 

Ms. Herman was a 
management intern this 
summer at the Circle 
Repertory Company in New 
York. She has studied at 
Juilliard, and, as her senior 
project, wrote and directed an 
opera . 

The two plays will be per- 
formed at 8 p.m. Reservations 
may be made by calling 452- 
8181 between 1:30 and 6 p.m., 
Monday through Saturday. 



«/<«<M/ X&oei <%-. fa. 






"A LITTLE JEWEL ON THE DELAWARE" 

...N.Y. TIMES 



/&o. Z'4--2<f/fS9* 



, 



The 1935 "Night at the 
Pat and Opera" is the one with the 
Marx Brothers in the 
stateroom. It has Margaret 
Dumont in the cast — 
naturally — and Kitty Carlisle 
and Allen Jones as the singing 
young lovers. 

"Pat and Mike" is one of the 
Spencer Tracy - Katharine 
Hepburn comedies. Hepburn 
is Pat, a topnotch athlete, and 
Tracy is Mike, her manager. 
Film buffs can look for the 
young Charles Bronson, at 
that time using the name 
Charles Buchinski. 



WORKSHOP 
Directors Hone Skills. 

Two contemporary one-act 
plays, to be given October 17- 
20, will sharpen the skills of 
Theatre Intime's directors. 
Brian Jones and Laura 
Berman -- the former a 
Princeton University 
sophomore, the latter a junior 
-- have been chosen for this 
year's workshop 

Theatre Intime is an 
organization of Princeton 
University students interested 
in all aspects of the drama. Its 
productions, given in Murray 
theatre on the University 
campus, are open to the 
public, as are the workshop 
presentations. 

The first of the two short 
plays, to be directed by Brian 
Jones, is "Welcome to 
Andromeda," the story of 321- 
year-old quadraplegic, who 
pleads with his nurse to end 
his suffering, the second play, 
"Home Free," concerns a 
brother and sister, alienated 
from society, and their in- 
cestuous relationship. Laura 
Berman will direct. 

Each of the directors has 
had experience in theatre. Mr. 



v 



For 



-^ WonJerfuf 

Goun/ry T)ininy 
in nearby JCinyston 

(across from Good Time Charley's) 

Superb Dinners Prepared By 
Our Culinary Institute Graduate Chef 

Friday & Saturday Evenings, 6-9 pm 
homemade soups, crepes, quiches & desserts 

Also 

Luncheon Specialties 

'The Diner In A Hurry" and "The Leisurely Diner" 
Tuesday-Saturday, 1 1 :30 am-2:30 pm 

r Reservations Optional • 924-0946 • 43 Mam SI . Kingston 



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j Far A way Places i 

JJewelry. Gifts* Clothing! 
• 1225B1 206 S 518 

I 924-4191 



The British Lion 




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Carriage & Oil Lamps 
Fine Brass Furnishings 

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Pennington, N.J. 

737-9666 
Open 9:30-5:30 

Sat. 9-5 
Parking in Rear 




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ABOUT 



EVERGREENS 
IN FALL 

with Sam deluro 

Woodwinds 
Associates 

WOODWINDS gels lots of calls 
in ine lall from homeowners 
concerned about browning and 
dropping needles ol 
Evergreens especially Pines 
II is normal for these irees lo 
shed their two- and three-year 
old needles Look closely at 
the irees lo make sure that no 
new growth is being lost, Ihis 
could mean (rouble irom a rool 
injury or some olher cause 
One Mini on preserving the 
healih ol Evergreens when the 
needles drop don t rake them 
up lei ihem remain where 
they tall Needles provide a 



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penng the soil 
during Ihe heal 
shielding it ag; 
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If Conifers have 
needles in excess Ihis fall, the 
best hope is lor abundanl 
rainfall before the ground 
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spell m the nexi month or so. 
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recommends leedlng with a 
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tree 'ood The in 
respond wiih new growth nexf 
spring 

WOODWINDS is happy to 
answer any queslion con- 
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shrubs please call us at 924- 
(500 



CALENDAR 
Of The Week 



Wednesday. October 10 
3 p.m.: Soccer, Lehigh vs. 

Princeton; Bedford Field. 
8 p.m.: Township Committee; 

Township Hall. 
8 p.m.: Joint Historic Sites 

Commission; Borough Hall. 

Thursday. October 11 

7:30 p.m.: Film. "Don 
Quixote." with Rudolf 
Nureyev; Rocky Hill Public 
Library. 

7:30 p.m.: Brecht, "The 
Visions of Simone Machard," 
McCarter Repertory 
Company; McCarter 
Theatre. 

8 p.m.: Hillel Illustrated 
Lecture. "Recent 

Photographs of Jerusalem 
and of People and rituals 
Around the world," Walter 
Kaufmann; 101 McCormick 
Theatre. 

8:30 p.m : Historical Society 
Lecture, "Who Went to 
Princeton 200 Years Ago?" 
Prof. Frank Craven; Con- 
vocation Room ; Engineering 
Quadrangle, Olden Street. 

Friday, October 12 

8:30-11:30 a.m.: French 
Flower Market, the Garden 
Club of Princeton; m impark 
oppositie TOWN TOPICS, 
Nassau and Mercer Streets. 

12:30 p.m.: Museum Break 
Talk, "18th Century French 
Drawings from the Musee 
Carnavalet," Christopher 
Comer; Princeton Art 
Museum. Also on Sunday at 
3. 

6:30 p.m.: International 
Volleyball Tournament, 
among 11 North American 
Colleges; Jadwin Gym- 
nasium. Play continues at 
9:30 a.m. Saturday. 

7:30-11:30 p.m.: International 
Folk Dancing, World Folk- 
dance Cooperative; 185 
Nassau Street. 

m.: Benny Carter and his 
All-Star Sextet, featuring 
Dizzy Gillespie; Alexander 
Hall 

8:30 p.m.: Brecht, "The 
Visions of Simone Machard," 
McCarter Repertory Com- 
pany, McCarter Theatre 



Also on Saturday and on 
Sunday at 2:30and7:30. 

Saturday. October 13 

11 a.m. 10 p.m. : Antique Show 
and Sale, sponsored by the 
Friends of N.J. State 
Museum, 205 West State 
Street, Trenton Also Sunday 
from noon to 6. 

11 a.m.: Football, Columbia 
Freshmen vs. Princeton 
Freshmen ; Finney Field. 

11 a.m.: Soccer, Columbia vs. 
Princeton; Bedford Field. 

1 pm : Puppy Sweepstakes, 
sponsored by Dog Owners 
Education League; 4-H 
Center, Milltown Road, 
Bridgewater Township. 

1:30 p.m.: Football, Columbia 
vs. Princeton; Palmer 
Stadium. 

2:30 p.m.: Gilbert 4 Sullivan's 
"The Mikado," Trenton 
Civic Opera; War Memorial, 
Trenton. Also at 8. 

8:30 p.m.: Friends of Music 
Concert, Geoffrey Michaels, 
violin, Barbara Blegen, 
piano; Woolworth Center. 

10:30 pm.: Delayed Tape of 
Columbia-Princeton Football 
Game; Channels 23 and 52. 

Sunday, October 14 

3 p.m.: Friends of Music 
Concert, Syrus Stevens, 
violin, Paul Lansky, French 
horn, Henry Martin, piano; 
Woolworth Center, 

University campus. 

4:30 p.m.: Annual Meeting of 
the Princeton Quarry Park 
Association; Community 
Room, Lloyd Terrace, 
Harrison Street. 



Monday, October 15 

Noon: Pre-concert lecture, 
John Ellis, chairman of 
Lawrenceville School music 
department, discussing all- 
Brahms program to be 
played by N.J. Symphony on 
Wednesday; Drumthwacket, 
Stockton Street. 

8 p.m.: Talk, "Are We Really 
Running Out of Energy," 
Alan Stang; reporter for 
American Opinion and the 
Review of the News; Holiday 
Inn, Route 1. 

8:30 p.m.: University Concert, 
Series I, James Galway, 
flute, with I Solisti; 
McCarter Theatre. 

8 p.m.: Planning Board 
Meeting; Valley Road 
Building. 



Tuesday. October 16 
5 p.m.: Ticket Applications 
Close for Penn vs. Princeton 
Football Game: Jadwin 
Gym 
8 p.m.: Board of Education; 
Valley Road Building. 
8-11 pm : International Folk 
Dancing, Princeton Folk 
Dance Group; Riverside 
School Instruction for the 
first hour. 

Wednesday. October 17 
8 p.m.: Township Committee, 
Township Hall 
8:30 p.m.: Concert. N.J. 
Symphony Orchestra, 
Thomas Michalak con- 
ducting all-Brahms 
program. Shura Cherkassky 
piano soloist; McCarter 
Theatre. 

Thursday, October 18 
2-4 p.m.: Free Child Health 

Clinic; Borough Hall. 
3:15 p.m.: TOWNSPEOPLE 

Meeting; Public Library 
8 p.m.: Princeton Community 

Orchestra; Band Room, 

Princeton High School. 



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921 7298 

Princeton, N J 



DEL VAL PHARMACY 

PENNINGTON 
SHOPPING CENTER 

Route 31 Pennmglon 

LeoS BrummeIRP 

Daily 9 to 9. Sat. 9 lo 6 

Sunday 9 to 1 

Phone 737-0900 




HALO 
TRACK LIGHTING 



Track lighting may be used on 
paintings; plant growth or to accent 
a feature in your home. This con- 
tinuous electric power source is 
available in 2. 4, 6. 8 or 12 foot 
lengths Just attach a miniature 
lampholder at any place on the track 
and put light exactly where you 
want it. 

Available in many colors - white, 
walnut, chrome black and bronze. 
Also available in many sizes and 
shapes 




PRINCETON ELECTRIC SUPPLY 

811 Hwy. #206 Princeton 921-6803 

'/> mile south ol Princeton Airport 
OPEN SATURDAY 8 :30- 1 2:30 PM • Daily 8-5 



DIMMER SWITCH with Purchase ol Track 
FREE Lighting Fixtures • Bring in this Ad 



THE BIG BAND IS BACK AND IT'S AT 
THE NASSAU INN 



Sunday 

October 14, 1979 
4 p.m. to 8 p.m. 



Listen to, dance to the 

big band sounds of 

Stan Rubin and his ? 

orchestra. The music \ -^ 

is true to the c 

traditions of Tommy and \ 

Jimmy Dorsey, Glenn Miller, / 

Harry James, Artie Shaw and Benny Goodman. 

And, the HI TONES will be therel 

The mood is marvelous. $2.50 cover. 

Just come and be happy! 



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ONE PALMER SQUARE, PRINCETON, M J (609)921-7 500 



MUSIC 
LESSONS 

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Prvtciton S Largest 

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134 Nassau St 

924-3413 

Uondar-Saturaay 9.5 30 



PRINCETON DfCOUTWG 
SHOP 




At my prices, gold It a 

good investment with large 

capital gains of enjoyment 

Along with antique Jewelry, 

I have lovely art deco, 

Cartler and Tiffany pieces 

at prices far less than at 

their points of origin. 

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at 
KINGSTON ANTIQUES 

43 Main St. Kingston, N.J. 
924-0332— Shop 
924-3923— home 

Open Tues.-Set 11-5 
& By Appointment 



SENIOR ACTIVITIES BRIEFS 

Informilton Provided by Stntof Resource Center. 
Spruce Circle. 924-7108 

Wednesday, Oct. 10: 10-1130 am MCCC In- 
troduction to Literature Poetry; Jewish Center 

11am VIM exercise class. YM-YWCA 

Senior Citizen's Club trip to Netcong tor lunch and 
show. "A Happy Time " Bus departs Community Park 
at9:30 

Thursday, Oct. 11: 1-2 30 p m MCCC International 
Relations. Mt Pisgah Church 

1-3 30 pm MCCC French Culture, SRC. Spruce 
Circle 

1 2 30-4 p m Hildas Workshop; Redding Circle. 
Friday, Oct. 12: 11 am: VIM exercise class. YM- 
YWCA 

Monday, Oct. 15: 10-11:30 a.m.: MCCC Introduction 
to Literature Poetry. Jewish Center, 

1 30 am Dance/Movement; SRC. Spruce Circle. 

11am VIM exercise class: YM-YWCA. ' 

12 30-4 p m Hilda's Workshop; Redding Circle. 
Tuesday. Oct. 16: 12 30-4 p.m.. Hilda's Workshop; 
Spruce Circle, 

1-3 p.m. Pottery. Redding Circle. 

1-2:30 p.m.: MCCC International Relations. Mt 
Pisgah Church 

7:30 p.m Bingo, refreshments. Redding Circle 
Everyone welcome 

Wednesday, Oct. 17: 10-11:30 am.: MCCC In- 
troduction to Literature Poetry. Jewish Center 

1 30 a m Readings Over Cotlee. "The Rime of the 
Ancient Mariner "; Public Library 

11am VIM exercise class, YM-YWCA 



SERIES TO OPEN wi " be the Russian-born 

With All Brahms Program, virtuoso Shura Cherkassky 
The New Jersey Symphony playing Concerto No. 1 for 
Orchestra will return to Piano and Orchestra in D 
McCarter Theatre on Wed- Minor, Op 15. The program 
nesday evening, October 17, at *i" also include Tragic 
8:30 for the first of four sub- Overture, Op. 81 and Sym- 
scription concerts scheduled phony No. 1 in C Minor, Op. 68. 

for the 1979-1980 season. 

In the all-Brahms program A student in Philadelphia 
conducted by Thomas Wllh Josef Hofmann, Mr. 
Michalak, the featured soloist Cherkassky's concert career 
now encompasses the entire 
musical world, and he 
gularly performs at the 
usic festivals of Europe. 




MUSIC 

In Princeton 



Among the last of the post- 
Romantic tradition of master- 
pianists, he has collaborated 
with some of today's most 
distingusihed conductors and 
orchestras. 

For ticket information, call 
McCarter Theatre 921-8700. 
Although the symphony series 
is heavily subscribed, single 
tickets are generally available 
at the box office. Subscribers 
who cannot attend a per- 
formance are urged to make 



The New H /rs ne ver 

School for ^H 

Music Study M t00late 

, »«•<». I***,™* wrmroN to begin! 

Adult beginners take heart! 

Always wanted to play piano? Never took lessons? 
Started as a child but stopped too soon? 

Now we can help you succeed in the friendly informality 
of a daytime or evening group. 

First 1 0-week term starts October 1 0th. 
Call (609) 921-2900 for full details. 



Afro-American Studies 
and Music Department 

JAZZ CONCERT - FRIDAY 

BENNY CARTER 

and his All-Stars, featuring 

DIZZY GILLESPIE 

with 

Joe Kennedy, violin 

and the 

Larry Ridley Trio 

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 12, 8 P.M. 
ALEXANDER HALL 



Tickets $5 General Public 



$3 P.U. Students 



On sale at: Nassau Street Jazz, 1 95 Nassau St. 
70 Washington Rd., Room 1 
42 McCosh 
and at the door 



Princeton University 

ORCHESTRA 



Michael Pratt, Conductor 



mzMv 



Qve.rh)re, To 



"Dpn^jpygnni 



fflZELi 



Mother 



^oose 



-KDBALYi 



Ho'rtj 



To'nos 



PUCCINI: In flo^W" 

Fmnle. of Act I 



Judith Nicosia , So prano 
Christopher f.AMEf yiu. Tfcnor 



FRI.. October 19 
SAT.. October 20 



8 30PM 



Alexander Hall 

ADMISSION FREE 



TILE 
DISCOUNT CENTER 

KORVETTESHPT CTR 

Trenlon 392-2300 

Carpeting — Ceramic Tile 




Apples 

Cider and 

MUMS 

PETERSON'S 

R t. 206 

Open Everyday 9-5 



Music in Princeton 

their tickets available for re- 
sale by contacting McCarter. 

The revenue from re-sale 
will be treated as a con- 
tribution, and a tax-deduction 
statement will be given. 

Pre-concert Lecture. Once 
again this season, the Prin- 
ceton Area Chapter of the New 
Jersey Symphony Orchestra 
league is sponsoring pre- 
concert lectures by John Ellis, 
chairman of the Lawren- 
ceville School music depar- 
tment. The first will be at 
Noon on Monday, October 15 
at "Drumthwacket," on Route 
206- All music lovers are in- 
vited to bring a sandwich and 
coffee will be provided. There 
is no admission fee. However, 
donations are welcome and 
membership in the Symphony 
chapter ($5) is encouraged. 



THROUGH OCTOBER... 

Wednesday is 
SENIOR CITIZEN 

DAY at 
L & M LAUNDRY 



• Save Vz on : 
: all Washers j 

• For Senior CHizens-Wed. Only • 




; Save 20% on Dry Cleaning • 
; Dry Cleaning by the Pound • 

•FOR SENIOR CITI7ENS-WEDNESDAY ONLY • 
•••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••a* 



WEDNESDAY ONLY • Senior Citizen Day 
Bring in this coupon and Receive 
FREE SOAP FOR FIRST WASH 



L & M LAUNDRY & DRY CLEANING 



Grand Union Shopping C 
Rocky Hlll/Prlncelon 



D'Cew Jersey Symphony Orcnes/ra 




Wednesday Evening 

October 1 7 

8:30 p.m. 

McCarter Theatre 

921-8700 



if SHURACHERKASSKY, Piano 
' HOMAS MICHALAK. Conducting 




ALL BRAHMS 
PROGRAM 

Tragic Overture, op. 81 

Piano Concerto No. 1 , op. 1 5 

Symphony No 1 , op. 68 

'Till music lovers are invited to a pre 
concert lecture by Join Cllis 
'Monday, October /J, 12 noon at 
' ' Drumilwaclei ' ' 7<toule 206, 
'Princeton. 
(2 miles sou/1 o/ (' Im TZoad tiaht) 

Information: Princeton Area Chapter 

\Cvw Jersey Symphony Orchestra Geaque 

Janet Haring 921 -2381 

Joan Hicks 921 -1065 

Cecilia Rosenblum 924-9734 

Ruth Thornton 921-6283 



Chapter members only (you being held for the other roles, 
mav join at the door) are Peter Westergaard will direct. 

invited to Prettv Brook Club 

on Sunday afternoon at 4:30 ENSEMBLE TO PERFORM 
where Mr. Ellis will highlight In Alexander Hall Concert, 
the all-Brahms program to be The "Concert Royal" will 
heard the following Wed- open the second season of 
nesday evening Refresh- "Sundays-at-Alexander" on 
ments will be served. October 21 at 3 in Alexander 

For further information. Hall. These concerts are 
call Janet Haring, 921-2381; presented by the Princeton 
Joan Hicks 921-1065: Cecilia University Concerts in an 
Rosenblum 924-9734; or Ruth effort to make the best music 
Thornton 921-6283. available at moderate prices. 

The Concert Royal is named 

BLUEGRASS PLANNED after the type of chamber 
As Folk Music Concert. The music suite that Couperin 
Folk Music Society is spon- composed for 18th century 
soring an evening of bluegrass French court musicales. The 
music with the Katie Laur ensemble specializes in music 
Band on Friday, October 19, at of the 17th and 18th centuries 
8 at All Saints' Church, and performs on original 
Terhune and All Saints' Road, instruments James Richman, 
Based in Cincinnati, the artistic director and harp- 
Katie Laur Band has achieved sichordist of the group, has a 
prominence as one of the most master's degree from Julliard 
versatile and popular groups where he studied with Albert 
on the eastern bluegrass Fuller 

circuit since its organization 

.n 1975 by Katie Laur, who has He has performed with the 
gained the label of the "queen Brandenburg Ensemble, the 
bee" of bluegrass music. Orpheus Ensemble and with 

the Aston Magna Festival. 

The Band performs a wide Sandra Miller, who will play 
range of material in a spirited flauto traverso, is a graduate 
style. In addition to traditional of the North Carolina School of 
bluegrass, the Band delves the Arts and the Curtis 
into country music, jazz and Institute Miss Miller played 
1950's rock and roll favorites, numerous solo and chamber 
Katie Laur can also deliver music recitals on the East 
powerful blues, as in her Coast and has performed on 
rendition of "Ain't 'he baroque flute at the Frick 
Misbehavin " Museum in N.Y. She is 

Admission is $3.50 for currently on the faculty of the 
adults, $3 for students and State University of New York 
senior citizens, $2.50 for at Purchase. 
Society members and $1.50 for 

children. There are no ad- Mary Springfels, viola da 
vance sales. Memberships are gamba, has been a member of 
also available at the door at $5 the New York Pro Musica 
per individual and $8 per Concert Ensemble and the 
family New York Pro Musica Consort 

of Viols. She is now a member 

FIRST CONCERT SET of several early music groups 
By University Orchestra, and has recently given 
The Princeton University recitals with Wendy Gillespie 
Orchestra will give its first an° Luc y Cross Ann 
concert of the season on Monoyios, soprano, has an 
Friday and Saturday, October MFA in music history from 
19 and 20, at 8:30 in Alexander Princeton University and now 
Hall The concerts are free lives in New York City where 
and open to the public she has appeared in numerous 

The program will include recitals. Besides "Concert 
the Overture to "Don Royal," she is also a member 
Giovanni" by Mozart, Ravel's of the Folger Consort of 
"Mother Goose" Suite, Washington, DC 
Kodaly's "Hary Janos Suite," The pro-am will include a 
and the finale of Act I of Rameau i Cantata, songs by 
Puccini's "La Boheme" with Pureed, Caccini, Frescobaldi, 
Judith Nicosia, soprano, and Monteverdi, arias by J.S. 
Christopher Cameron, tenor. Bach and instrumental works 
Miss Nicosia is a graduate by J S. Bach and Leclair 
of Indiana University who has Tickets at $3 ($1.50 students) 
studied with Pierre Bernacare available at the Concert 
and is the recipient of many Office, Woolworth Center, 
fellowships. She has been a Princeton University 924- 
finalist in major competitions 0453, or at the door. Phone 
and has done extensive recital reservations will be accepted, 
work. 

Mr. Cameron is a graduate 
of the Cleveland Institute of 
Music. He is a member of 
several opera companies and 
recently sang the Count at the 
Washington Civic Opera's 
production of the "Barber of 
Seville." 

The Princeton University 
Orchestra has grown in size 
and stature under the 
leadership of Michael Pratt. 
In April the Orchestra will 
present an all-Beethoven 
program, including the 
Symphony No. 5 and the Piano 
Concerto No. 4 with Edward T. 
Cone, pianist. Also in April, it 
will join with the Princeton 
Freshmen singers in a per- 
formance of Beethoven's 
Mass in C Major. 

In February the Orchestra 
will combine with the Prin- 
ceton University Opera 
Theatre to present Mozart's 
"Don Giovanni." Miss Nicosia 
will be heard as Donna Anna 
and Anne Ackley as Donna 
Elvira. Auditions are now 



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OCT. 13 
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The Friendi of Music ui I'rinceton 



QE0FFREY MICHAELS, Violm 

BARBARA BLESEN, P,an 

6,1 gar, 3rQhms, tbeetnoven 






SUN. 

OCT 14 
300 PM 



Violin; CYRUS STEVENS 
French horn: PAUL LAN5KY 

ftan« HEW MARTIN 
Srai/m Carter, Sfo 2 art, start in 

WOOLWORTH CENTER 

Admissum Free ^_____ 




workbench 



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SEND $2 FOR OUR 44 PAGE CATALOGUE 

55 State Road |Rte 206), Pnnceron. N J [609] 924 96V 
l' YORK ALBANY. N V •HACrOHNSACKflOCHBLU RUHt 

IVoHOMrK M\ss . H AK I M >RI I Mill OHO. I ONN 



1 


24 Vnhertpoon St ' 


ART 


B 






d 


In Princeton 




B 


6 Chombers Wolh 
»21-3231 






3 


AREA ARTISTS SELECTED 




Mon Sot 10-6 


For Exhibit at State 





Sundoy 1-5 


Museum. A number of 


te 




Princeton area residents are 


3 




among the 115 New Jersey 




Eng/Zsrt 


artists from 17 counties who 




have been selected to show 


S 


fleprodijcf/on 


one of their recent works in 




the Second Biennial New 


3 


VV//VE 


Jersey Artists exhibition at 


. 


the New Jersey State Museum 


o 


COASTERS 


in Trenton The exhibit will 
open on October 20 and will 


1 


QH|t iJKluer fctpp 


continue through December 2. 
The artists from Princeton 


™ 


and the work they will be 


5 


59 Palmer Square West 


showing are Rich Chu, 228D 


E 


924-2026 


Harrison Street, photograph; 
Margaret Fisher, 105 Audubon 


P 








Lane, photograph; Eileen 




a/TV 


Hohmuth, 249 Cherry Hill 


- 


f 11 


Road, poly toned photograph; 




U? 


Jim McDonald, 7 Madison 
Street, photograph; Jane 
Teller 200 Prospect Avenue, 
wood; Herk Van Tongeren, 




Give A Picture, 


Ettl Farm, red bronze and 
lead, Steven L. Weiss, 94 




Give 


North Stanworth Drive, 
marble, Constance Wellnitz, 




Some Pleasure. 


194 North Harrison Street, 
photograph and Robert A. 
Devoe, Johnson Atelier, 743 




QUEENSTOWN 


Alexander Road, mixed 




1S1 *DlH»i'i»» 

Pvnnlngton, N.X 

Tu.s.-SjL 9:30-6 737-1 »76 


media; 
Also, from Hopewell Chris 




Craig, 37 Somerset Stree 
mixed media drawing, Gar 


y 




GRAND OPENING 






Tuesday, October 16th 






After Three Years of 






Fine Framing in Princeton 






Abbv is Now in Her Own 






Shop in Hopewell. 






She Invites All Old 






and New Customers to 






Visit Her at the 






Hopewell frame shop 






48 West Broad Street 






'Hop.wf II Home Square) 






466-0817 • Hopewell 






Free Delivery In Princeton 


1 




Wjm Film 

SQ Processing «* S 


J 




Saretzky, 3 West Broad 
Street, Hopewell, silver print, 
K.S Mclndoe. 18 Burton 
Avenue, oil on canvas; and 
from Lawrenceville, Audbrey 
J. Kauffman, 89 Phillips 
Avenue, photograph. 

GALLERY TO OPEN 

At 1st National Bank 
Branch. The First National 
Bank of Princeton will open its 
new art exhibition gallery at 
the bank's East Nassau Street 
Branch on Wednesday, 
October 17, at an Open House 
from 5 to 7. On view for the 
occasion, through November 
30 are paintings by Karen 
Dennis and watercolors by 
Marguerite Doernbach. 

Ms. Dennis has had her 
work exhibited at the Parsons- 
Dreyfuss Gallery in New 
York, Firestone Library, 
Princeton and the Portland 
Art Museum in Oregon. 

Mrs. Marguerite Doernbach 
studied at the American 
Artists School New York, the 
School of Graphic Arts and the 
Tyler School of Art. her work 
has been exhibited at the 
Rotunda Gallery, London, and 
The Little Gallery, 
Philadelphia. 

The public is Invited to 
attend the Open House at 370 
East Nassau Street. For more 
information, call Maureen M. 
Gopel at 921-6100. 

EXHIBIT PLANNED 

At Watersheds Association. 
The Princeton Art Association 
is sponsoring an exhibit at the 
Stony Brook-Millstone 
Watersheds Reserve on 
Wargo Road, Hopewell 
Township, on Saturday, 
October 20. Water colorists, oil 
and acrylic painters, and print 
makers, all members of the 
Princeton Art Association, 
will have their works on 
display in the Pond House frm 
11-6. There will also be a water 
color demonstration during 
the afternoon. Approximately 
20 works will be on exhibit and 
for sale. A portion of the 
profits will go to the Water- 
sheds Association 

Exhibits will include prints 
by Elizabeth Monath, 
watercolors by Mumie 
Warga; drawings and pain- 
tings by A.R. Fishcer; oils by 
Helen Gallagher, water colors 
by Bunny Newman, 
photographs by Kathleen 
Ireland; and flower paints by 
CarinLaughlin. 

Interested parties are also 
invited to attend the Second 



Annual Barn Warming and 
Barn Dance from 3:30 to9:30. 
Both events will be cancelled 
if the weather is bad. Radio 
station WHWH will carry 
cancellation notice. For ad- 
ditional information call the 
Watersheds at 737-3735. 

MUSEUM TO BENEFIT 

From Antique Show. 
Antiques dealers from 
throughout the mid-Atlantic 
area will be represented the 
weekend of October 13 and 14 
when the New Jersey State 
Museum in Trenton opens its 
doors for a major antiques 
show and sale. 

Sponsored by the Friends of 
the Museum organization to 
benefit the Decorative Arts 
Acquisition fund, the show is 
being managed by the Pink 
House Antiques of New Hope, 
Pa . Co-chairmen for the three- 
day affair are Mrs. Peter 
Carter and Miss Suzanne 
Corlette, both of Princeton. 

Admission will be $2.50 each 
day Hours will be 11 to 10 on 
Saturday and noon to 6 on 
Sunday. There will be free 
parking behind the Museum 
both days. 

A Friends-sponsored 
preview reception from 6 to 10 
Friday will provide an op- 
portunity to examine the 
objects being shown. The 
admission price of $15 per 
person includes a light buffet. 
There will also be a cash bar. 

Featured in the show will be 
18th and early 19th century 
American, English and 
French formal, country and 
primitive furniture; 
American Belleek and other 
19th century procelains: 
Goergian and Victorian 
silver; Oriental rugs; folk art 
including quilts; and a variety 
of 18th and 19th century 
porcelains and potteries 

A special Museum 
exhibition being mounted in 
conjunction with the antiques 
show will illustrate how fine 
and decorative art objects are 
documented and authen- 
ticated. This exhibition will 
continue through December 9. 

The Museum is located at 
205 West State Street in 
Trenton's State House 
Complex. For further in- 
formation on the show and 
sale, phone the Friends of the 
Museum office at 394-5310. 

STUDIO OPENS 

In Cranbury. The Lee Stang 

Harr Art Studio has opened at 




PRINCETON 
ART ASSOCIATION 

Rosedale Road 
921-9173 



One piece or an entire estate . . . 

we are always interested in 
purchasing your diamonds, jewelry, 
sterling silver flatware and holloware 



Perrisue Silver 
Princeton. N J. 
609-924-2141 



G.I. A. Certified 
Immediate cash paid 



1 



-.guild gallery.. 

Where you don't need 

to wait for weeks 

...to have the finest 

in custom framing. 



FINE 
ART 



HAWUOHAr ; tU 
POTTERY 



CUSTOM 
FRAMING 



In the montgomery center • rocky hill 
(609)921-8292 

Mon.-SaL 10-6; Fri. Eve. 'til 9; Sunday 1 1-5 




-fZTL 



Aila Mackenzie and Jackie Phares of McCarter 

Associates have designed an After the Theater 

Supper Table with plates from the Limoges Uuirnrii 

series, Val St Lambert all-purpose wine bubbles, and 

Tiffany Prm-rmr silverware to highlight the 1979-80 

season at 

MrCARTER THEATRE 

Drama series begins Table on view 

October 2nd until October 1 3 



The First National Bank of Princeton takes pleasure 
in announcing a new art exhibition gallery at our East 
Nassau Street Branch. 

On view until November 30, 1979 

Paintings by 

Karen Foote Dennis 

Watercolors and Drawings by 
Marguerite Doernbach 

We cordially invite you to join us at our 
OPEN HOUSE 

Wednesday, October 17, 1979 

5 P.M. - 7 P.M. 

370 East Nassau Street 

Princeton, New Jersey 

Exhibit arranged by the Princeton Gallery ol Fine Art 

I The First National Bank 
I of Princeton 

Member United Jersey Banks 




New* Of 

Clubs and Organizations 



The Singles Fellowship will 
hold a newcomers coffee and 
conversation this Thursday at 
7:45 at the Nassau 
Presbyterian Church. All 
single, divorced or widowed 
adults over 25 are invited. For 
information call 452-1368. 

The Princeton Chapter of 
the National Association of 
Accountants will meet 
Wednesday, October 17, at 
Prospect House, Princeton 
University, with social hour at 
5 30 and dinner at 6 30 

The program, co-sponsored 
by the Princeton University 
Fellowship Program in 
Economic Journalism and the 
Princeton Chapter of the 
National Association of 
Accountants, will feature as 
its speaker Dr Abraham 
Briloff, who will address the 
audience on the Corporate 
Accountability "Sin-Drome." 

Guests are welcome. For 
reservations, contact Marleen 
Kilgore, 201-874-2000. 

The Soroptimlst Club of 
Princeton will host the 
District 2 Meeting Saturday at 
Forsgate Country Club, 
Jamesburg. Co-chairmen of 
the event are Dorothea 
Lummis and Christine- 
Rapking Allen. Registration 
will begin at 8 with Mrs. Betty 
Dukro in charge. The morning 
session will start at 9 : 30. 

The regular monthly 
meeting will be held Tuesday 
at 6:30 in the Nassau Inn. 
Guest speaker will be Bernice 
Schwartz, who will talk about 
"One Woman in Princeton." 

The Princeton-Trenton 
Chapter of the Special 
Libraries Association will 



meet Wednesday, October 17, 
at 1:30 the Glendale Inn, 
Trenton 

The speakers, Robert L. 
Bland, law coordinator at the 
New Jersey State Library, 
and Catherine East, head of 
Reference Service at Cherry 
Hill Public Library, will 
highlight current legal and 
general reference materials, 
respectively. This free lecture 
is open to the public. 

The Mid-New Jersey 
Chapter of the American 
Society for Training and 
Development will meet on 
Thursday, October 18, at the 
Forsgate Country Club. The 
program will cover the uses of 
The Assessment Center for 
Measuring and Developing of 
Human Potential. The session 
begins at 9 and luncheon will 
be served at noon. Members 
and non-members are invited. 

The Women's College Club 
will meet Tuesday at 1:30 at 
All Saints' Church, Van Dyke 
Road. Dr. Norman B. Ryder of 
Princeton University will 
speak on "The Future of 
American Fertility." Dr. 
Ryder is a professor in the 
Department of Sociology and 
faculty research associate in 
the Office of population 
Research at Princeton 
University. 

Those who would like to join 
Dr. and Mrs. Ryder for lunch 
at the Nassau Club at 12 noon 
should call Mrs. William 
Turnbull at 924-1370. Refresh- 
ments will be served at the 
meeting. Guests are welcome. 

The Princeton Quarry Park 
Association will meet Sunday 
at 4 : 30 in the community room 
of the Lloyd Terrace Senior 



Citizen housing complex on 
Harrison Street. 

The Quarry Park 
Association spearheaded the 
drive to preserve the old 
quarry at the foot of Spruce 
Street for recreational pur- 
poses The Borough purchased 
the quarry about two years 
ago and is now proceeding 
with its development as a 
park. 

Membership in the 
Association is open to all 
neighbors and friends of the 
park area. At the annual 
meeting, officers will be 
elected for 1979-80, a report 
will be offered on the latest 
Borough plans for the park's 
development, and a recom- 
mendation by the executive 
committee for the donation of 
Association funds to the 
Borough for the park's lan- 
dscaping will be offered. 

The Riverside PTO will give 
a reception to welcome Gene 
Biringer as the new principal 
at the home of Dr and Mrs. 
Gil Falcone, 621 Lake Drive 
this Thursday from 8 to 10 
p.m. The Riverside School 
community - parents, 
teachers and staff -- are in- 



vited. 

The YWCA International 
Club will meet this Thursday 
from 8-10 in the lounge of the 
YM-YWCA on Paul Robeson 
Place. Two movies will be 
shown, "The Young Man and 
Death," with Nureyev, and 
"Afghanistan." Refreshments 
will be served and candidates 
for the executive committee 
will be recruited. 

The Lawrence Township 
Senior Citizens Club I will not 
have the regular meeting as is 
the custom on the third 
Tuesday. However, members 
will journey to Club Bene for a 
buffet luncheon followed by 
the show "Funny Girl 
featuring Mimi Hines. Buses 
will leave the Lawrence 
Shopping Center at 9:45 a 



"Dyeing the Natural Way" 
will be demonstrated by Mrs. 
Frances E Mustard this 
Thursday at a meeting of the 
Dogwood Garden Club. The 
meeting will be held at the 
home of Mrs. Joseph L. 
Pierson on Route 206. Mrs 
Pierson will be assisted by 
Mrs William Boyd. 

The monthly meeting of the 
Hightstown Registered 
Nurses Association will be 
held on Tuesday at the 
Meadow Lakes Nursing Care 
Facility. All registered nurses 
are invited. The speaker will 
be Dr Raymond Schweibert. 
a psychiatrist in practice at 
the Princeton House Unit of 
the Medical Center at Prin- 
ceton, who will present a 
program on "Psychiatric 
Evaluation of Children and 
Adolescents." Discussion and 
refreshments will follow. 

American Association of 
Retired Persons, Princeton 
Chapter 459, will meet on 
Thursday, October 18, at 2 at 
the YM-YWCA. Helen and 
Frank Zavitkovsky of Pen- 
nington will present "A Look 
at Mainland China," a report 
of their trip to the People's 
Republic last summer, 
illustrated with slides. 

After their presentation, 
there will be a brief review of 
the pros and cons of con- 
solidation All individuals 55 
and over are welcome. 

Dr. Robert Kunin, an in- 
ternationally known ion ex- 
change specialist, will present 
his impressions of the Peoples 
Republic of China in a talk 
"China Visited and Revisted" 
at the joint meeting of the 
American Chemical Society's 
Trenton and American 
Institute of Chemical 
Engineers', Central Jersey 
Sections on Tuesday at 8 in the 
Rider College faculty dining 
room. The meeting is open to 
the public. 




14K GOLD 
CHAINS and BRACELETS 



UKGold 

S-Chain Bracelets 

Reg. '17 »10' 

LIMITED SUPPLY 



Ear Piercing • Walch Repair 



It 



Anthony & Patricia 
Jewelers 

The Vlllaqe Shopper • Rle. 206 & 518 • Rocky Hill 
(609) 924-6195 





EXPERIENCED • DEDICATED • RESPONSIVE 




HE HAS SERVED... 

ENVIRONMENTAL COMMISSION OF PRINCETON 

PRESIDENT AND BUDGET CHAIRMAN, UNITED WAY 

PRESIDENT, COUNCIL OF COMMUNITY SERVICES 

WARDEN, TRINITY CHURCH 

PRESIDENT, KIWANISCLUB 

TREASURER, CHAMBER OF COMMERCE AND CIVIC COUNCIL 

GERARD B. LAMBERT COMMUNITY SERVICE AWARD 

MARRIED TO ANNE, TEACHER AT THE TRAINING SCHOOL FOR 

BOYS IN SKILLMAN; FATHER OF 2 SONS, STEP-FATHER OF 5 

VICE-PRESIDENT, TUCKER, ANTHONY & R L DAY 
HAS LIVED AND WORKED IN PRINCETON SINCE 1 957 
... HE'LL SERVE FOR YOU 



George Adriance 



GEO" 



for Princeton Township Committee 



IT'S NEW 

To Is 




1 NEW PERSPECTIVES 
o At Nassau Interiors, 
v Exciting new concepts of 

2 design and service are being 
J2 offered by Nassau Interiors. 
2 The newly redecorated store 
2 presents inviting suxroun- 
5 dings for a new line of office 
-»" furniture with a refreshing, 
* natural look, luxurious leather 
g furnishings for office or home, 
B and beautiful upholstered 
o pieces, as well as tables, 
5 chests, etageres. mirrors and 
a. lamps for every decor, 
to In addition, Nassau 
^ Interiors has a total design 
o service, including remodeling 
2 for homes and offices, and a 
S huge new furniture clearance 
2 center will open soon on State 

Highway 206 

Nassau Interiors also offers ORIENTAL TRANQUILITY is reflected by the bronze 
moderate prices and seasoned f jg ur j ne , the bamboo wood and glass coffee table and 
virtuosity in decorating "My the Chinese red ve | vel covered sofa and love seat by 
philosophy is Exciting Mar i mount , shown at Nassau Interiors. Exciting new 
S U aTmX°a?e nric e es an " conce P ,s in •"mlihlnga *»* • total decorating service 
tOTt/tr Leonard I SpSc.. tor ., h » mM ? nd °" iCeS ' includin 9 '•«»*»""«. are 

the stores owner "We have 30 avai .'. a ^e at the store. 

years' experience in the home individual pieces or a com- genuine top grain leather, are 
furnishings field and 10 years' plete office environment, available, 
experience in off ice interiors - Natural oak revealing the true Lamps complementary to 
the skills, knowledge and grain of the wood is designed the furniture have been 
decorating expertise to create as a contemporary executive selected from Koch and Lowy 
a residential or office setting desk, an excutive secretarial or George Kovacs with a 
with an individual look." desk or credenza. choice of plain linen or pleated 

Walnut is shown in a library linen shades. Desk lamps 

Office Furniture. The trend desk table, an adaptation of a range from a tiered walnut 
toward natural looks, in both Risom design, and also in a and oak base to a square 
contemporary and traditional spacious Chippendale-style column in shining brass or 
styles, is displayed in a new double pedestal desk with a chrome. A standing floor lamp 
line of office furnishings, U" overhang to accommodate with a chrome base has a 
which can be purchased as chairs for a small conference swing arm and also telescopes 
at the desk. up or down to adjust for 

height. 
„.. ... Nassau Interiors' out- 

Chairs include a mar- standing assis tancc to 
velously comfortable swivel- businesS e s and professions 
tilt executive desk chair indudes botn architectural 
upholstered in beige or camel and interior desi The 
father with hand laced services needed for the 
detailing Conference chairs remodeling of small offices or 
in a classic Breuer style spaces , moderate si2e win 
provide contemporary De coordin a ted and super . 
elegance and comfort at a low vised and , ne int £ im 
price of $54.50^ A striking dec orating completed with 
upholstered chair has a ca ting drap p erieSt fur . 
chrome sleigh base with MuIe and acc( £ sories The 
button cushioning in textured client dea|s with one reon 
brown and beige fabric. „„, wmch , s particu | arl 
Tradition is represented by a he , fu , ,„ £ new , ^ 

Chippendale-style desk chair ^^ 

in leather with solid brass 

nailheadtnm Leather Furniture. A large 

Upholstered furniture in the selection of upholstered 
new cube series exhibits leather furniture is also 
square shapes with plump available, promising enduring 
cushions for a crisp un- beaut >' and ]mur y t0 home s 
cluttered look particularly and off 'ces Sofas and chairs 
adaptable to offices. The are offered in a variety of 
group includes a sofa, short distinguished traditional or 
sofa and chair in a tweedy fiat contemporary designs, 
weave of wool and nylon, but Comfortable, long-wearing, 
many other fabrics, including requiring little care, they are 



FILA 



THE ULTIMATE 

in golf and tennis 
apparel. 

Available Only 




Professional 
Golf and Tennis 



upholstered in a Chinese red 
fabric and a basket weave 
design, then given several 
coats of lacquer; also 
available in other colors. 
Bamboo wood and glass tables 
with mirror framed tops and 
beveled glass inserts from the 
Brandt Cabinet Company are 
$240 for a coffee or end table, 
$469 for a console or sofa table. 
Marimount 's armless chair in 
Chinese red textured velvet 
has an understated oriental 
base, $199, and can be ordered 
in duplicate or triplicate for 
bunching. 

Nassau Interiors is 162 
Nassau Street. Store hours are 
9-5:30 Monday through 
Friday ; 9-5 Saturday. 

LATEST SHOE STYLES 
At Nassau Shoe Tree. Fall 
fashions in shoes, prettier and 
more wearable than ever, can 
be seen at Nassau Shoe Tree. 
Pumps are fashion news, 
complementing the daytime 
and dinner suits important 
this fall. 

Flattering sandals with 
graceful, narrow straps, so 
becoming with softly styled 
dresses, and a selection of 
boots - some with quilted tops 
in keeping with the season's 
quilted coats -- are also in- 
cluded in the shop's collection, 
and all are within a price 
range of $25-$80. 

Pumps. The array of pumps 
at Nassau Shoe Tree shows 
many fascinating choices — 
high heels, mid-heels, closed 
looks, open looks, two-toned or 
monotone, perforated or plain, 
smooth leathers or suedes, in 
fashion colors of black, brown, 
wine taupe or gray. 

Pumps made exclusively for 
Nassau Shoe Tree, known for 
their excellent fit, include a 
taupe leather pump with toe 
and heel in a black lizard print 
and a taupe suede with 
decorative perforations, both 
under $60. I. Miller's pump in 
taupe suede has a latticed 



Gunsser Antique Restoration 

Our 1 7th year devoted to the restoration of antique furniture. 



We will be exhibiting at the Hopewell 

Valley Historical Society Antique Show 

Oct. 25 & 26 — Pennington 



PHONE 609 737-0800 



SONEX ORIENTAL RUGS 




Perslon and Other 
Handwoven Carpets 

Wholesale/Reioil 



1 30 Washington St. 

Rocky Hill. N.J. 
024-8 7 S8 




HANS & MARIA 

(formerly of the Princetonian) 

welcome you 

to 

IMAGE HAIRCUTTERS 

for Men & Women 

at 

81 2 State Road 

(2 doors South of the Nickel) 

Princeton, N.J. 



CLOSED 
MONDAYS 



924-8828 



a thoughtful investment 
quality and pleasure, and 
become even lovelier with 
usageandtime. 

Residential Furniture. "We 

carry a line of upholstered 
furniture by Marimount. a 
division of Henredon Fur- 
niture, which is well-priced 
because of the company's new 
factory production scale," Mr. 
LaPlaca states. "By buying in 
large quantities, we can offer 
a sofa for $499. a love seat for 
$399 and an upholstered chair 
for $249-$299 and construction 
and styles are in keeping with 
Henredon's reputation. 

"We give the best values 
possible in this price range, 
underselling major New York 
stores by approximately 20 
percent, because department 
stores feel the furniture has a 

ilue that can demand higher 



prl 



We 



carry 



Henredon's top-of-the-line 
upholstered furniture as well 
as case goods - cabinets, 
tables, desks, etageres, etc." 

The oriental influence is 
very prominent in all fur- 
nishing this fall Gillian's 
traditional sofa is upholstered 
ma fa brlc showing water lilies 
and cranes, $899. Baker's 
able has been fully 




library. The possibilit 
r wide 
afted 



book, 
while 



?r 500 hand 

orients. Cabinets. < hests. desks, 
ases. shelves, hanging units and 
lid 



maple 



Con 



full-length piano hinges on all cabinet 
doors, dovet.iiled and center-guided 
lection drawers, adjustable shelves and hard- 
wood backings Hand-sanded and 
ready to finish with oil, varnish, stain 
1 you can 



. -reate an entire syslem and slill slay 
Inut with details like within v 



> your budge 



f 1 



Country Workshop 

Send 5GV for our complete catalog. 

The Marketplace 

Rts. 27 & 518 

Princeton. NJ 08540 

(201) 297-1887 

10-5:30 Mon.. Tues.. & Wed.; 10-9 Thurs & Fri 

10-5:30 Sat.: closed Sun 

k " N ' U " k * ' ''•"■ "'" "" W«- 1« < l..i«V. MX ( I,,,!.,,,,!, till 

MAN AND [-HOM. (,m>l KS VISA AND MAS 1 1 RC HAHCr. ACCEPTED 



1 



It's New to Us 

insert over the toes and a 
tapered, comfortable heel. 

Joyce's stunning pumps in 
taupe or lack suede, styled 
with an open crisscross design 
are $44. DeLiso's leather 
' pump with an open back and 
closed toe, features a Chanel- 
style tip - black patent on 
camel or navy patent on navy. 
Garolini's black kid pump 
with tapered high heel and 
open toe is given a flirty, 
elegant look with a pompom. 

High heels, which extend the 
leg and give pleasing 
proportions to the silhouette 
when longer skirts are worn, 
are beginning to come down in 
height now that hemlines are 
rising. A forerunner is Jack 
Rodger's little Louis scooped 
heel shown on a black leather 
pump with a detachable 
leather strap, that can be 
worn three ways: without the 
strap it is a straightforward 
pump; with the strap around 
the instep, it has a tailored 
look; with the strap attached 
to the back and fastened 
around the ankle, it becomes 
very feminine and appealing. 
The person who buys it will be 
avant garde all winter and at 
the height of fashion next 
spring. 

Sandals. Beautiful sandals 
from Intermezzo in lustrous 
bronze or silver leather, with 
high heels, sling back and 
open toe, are graced by a 
jaunty leaf; shoes $45, mat- 
ching handbag, $19. 

Jack Rodger's sought-after 
style, so pretty and com- 
fortable to wear, is an 
arrangement of straps drawn 
together over the toes and a 
tapered low heel, in bronze or 
silver, and is also shown in a 
new variation with wishbone 
strap in taupe or black. 
Gleaming black satin sandals 
with an instep strap that 
comes from the vack, are only 
$25! 

Wine, a predominant shade 
in shoes this fall, is the 
season's neutral color, worn 
with pink, plum, peach, blue, 
navy, gray, brown, black and 
even red! 

Garolini's sophisticated 
sandal with a very narrow 
diagonal strap across the 
instep, a wider strap over the 
toe and a tapered narrow heel, 
is shown in wine suede or 
black kid. DeLiso's soft 
leather pump, in wine, has 
scooped sides to minimize foot 
length, $52. Nassau Shoe 
Tree's own wine suede pump 
has a mid heel and a suave 
pinked bow, $56. 

Slides and Classics. Popular 
alides, seen everywhere this 
summer are available at the 




RECORDS ETC 

MONTGOMERY CENTER, ROCKY HILL, 924-8688 



*' 






iA 



THE NEWS IN SHOES is well known to Jane Tobish, 
owner of Nassau Shoe Tree, who presents a selection 
of pumps, the most important shoe fashion for fall. 
Pumps complementary to suits, flattering sandals for 
softly styled dresses, popular slides, mid-heel 
classics and boots with quilted tops are all in step 
with the latest styles in women's wear and available at 
the shop. 

shop in Bernardo's delightful rounded top in black, taupe, or 
design for fall - camel, black brown leather, $31. A flat 
or honey suede with sucked channel-quilted envelope 
heels. A glamorous slide due clutch, with over-the-shoulder 
to arrive for the holidays is strap, in black, wine or camel, 
lucite with a satin heel and i s easily packed for travel, 
bow in red, champagne or $37. An adaptation of Anne 
black. Klein's large shoulder strap 

Among the classics for bag with many compartments 
casual wear are multi- and fold-over flap, is shown in 
strapped fisherman's sandals black, wine or tan for $54. 

with closed heels from Jack 

Rodgers in navy, brown or Preview of Summer styles, 
camel leather. Spectators jane Tobish, already thinking 
with brown leather trim on summer, gives us a preview of 
taupe suede are offered in two the latest styles ordered for 
styles - open toe and back the Nassau Shoe Tree. Pumps 
with high stacked heels or a will lead again this spring, but 
closed shoe with stacked mid- more open styles will prevail 
heel A crepe-soled suede with during the summi 
a kiltie flap, in brown or taupe, black and white the leading J 
is nicely priced at $40. colors. 

Slides in all heel heights will 

Boots. Fashionable fall and again be very popular. 

winter boots arriving this Dressy, feminine shoes will be 
month include high boots in enhanced with many 
cinnamon Cuchino leather, decorative motifs -- Jack 
which can be crushed down, Rodger's wishbone sandal 
rolled over or worn straight with tapered heel is styled 
up, an ankle high boot in wine with multi-colored petal 
Cuchino leather in a wrap and straps, in an adaptation of a 
tie style, and a high boot in Maud Frizom design. Geller' 
brown or taupe calfskin with a high heeled shoe with a back 
mid heel. Weather boots with strap will be shown in pastels 
natural or red waterproof andskins. 
bootoms and quilted tops, Nassau Shoe Tree, 
blend with theseason's quilted Palmer Square, West, is open 
coats. An ankle high water- 9:30-5:00, Monday through 
proof boot closes with lacing. Saturday. 

-Keitha Davey 

Handbags. Leather hand- 
bags, handsomely styled in or Dar , , lme 10b mav t 
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leather is $19; a clutch with a 




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o ENGAGEMENTS Donald Lyons 01 Trinity 

„■ RoMseau-Griggs. Celeste B. Church Vineyard Haven. 
< Rousseau, daughter of Mr. performed the ceremony. 
8 MdMrs. Russell W Rousseau l . The *>"*'■ a 8 raduale »' 
S of 167 Harrison Street, to Vassar College, was formerly 
S George W. Griggs Jr.. son of *'" n ' h <! Fo 8f Art Museum. 

* Mr and Mrs George W. Cambridge. Mass She was a 
■f Griggs Sr of Kannapolis N C Na "o" al Endowment for the 

* The future bride is an Ar ' s Fe ' low m Washington, 
z alumna of Notre Dame High D c ■• and Presently works as 
° School and Sacred Heart an arts consultant in 
o College in Belmont, N.C. Her Washington 

5 fiance is attending the M , r S ale : a graduate of 
£ University of North Carolina Bucknell University, received 
«" at Charlotte his master s degrees from 

Harvard University and the 
University of Pennsylvania 



j A September wedding 
o planned. 




Rev. Nicholas Youpa of- 
ficiating. 

Mrs. Cullen was graduated 
from Lawrence High School 
and is associated with her 
husband's father at Shuren 
Furniture & Upholstery in 



lie 



Mrs. Donald F. Con 



Following a honeymoon trip 
to Bermuda, the couple are 
living in Lawrenceville. 

Flemer-Weaver. Jane 
Weaver, daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. Joseph W. Weaver of 
Goshen, Ind , to William 
Flemer IV, son of Mr. and 
Mrs. William Flemer III of 
College Road, Kingston; 
September 29 at All Saints' 
Episcopal Church, the Rev. A. 
Orley Swartzentruber of- 
ficiating. 

Mrs. Flemer has been 
employed by the New School 
for Music Study in Kingston as 

teacher of piano and piano 



WEDDINGS 



Bailey-Worhunsky. 

Elizabeth A. Worhunsky, 



Connors-Merrill. Alison L. 

_ .urrently a doctoral Merrill, daughter of Dr. and 

candidate at The George Mrs. Leland G. Merrill Jr of pedagogy. She will continue 

Washington University where 49 Gulick Road, to Donald F. graduate work in music 

ninllo-Terry. Virginia L he is an Assistant Professor of Connors Jr., son of Mr and theory at the University of 

Terry, daughter of Mr and Urban and Regional Planning. Mrs. Connors of Garden City, Pennsylvania next fall. 

Mrs Lea E.Terry of Trenton, The couple will reside in NY; September 22 at Nassau Mr. Flemer will continue to 

to Anthony M Cirullo, Jr. son Washington, DC. Presbyterian Church, the work for his family's Prin- 

of Mr and Mrs Anthony M Rev. Leslie Merlin officiating. ceton Nurseries. He is a 

Cirullo Sr. of 28 Humbert Hoover-Johnson. Elizabeth The bride was graduated graduate of Princeton Day 
Street; September 8 in H Johnson, daughter of from Rutgers University Sch ool and the University of 
Covenant Presbyterian Tristam B Johnson of 84 Hun where she was elected to Phi Wisconsin. 
Church. Trenton, the Rev. Road and Mrs. Roswell Miller Beta Kappa Formerly a After a trip across Canada 
Hugh Smith 3rd officiating. Ill of New York City, to Scott municipal bond trader in Wall and the Pacific Northwest, the 

Mrs. Cirullo was graduated Hoover, son of W. Scott Street, she is production couple will live in Kingston. 
from Villa Victoria Academy Hoover of Williamstown, coordinator for Don Connors 
and attended Mercer County Mass . and Mrs. Tom Walsh of Productions, a film production 
College She is employed by Arizona; October 7 in a company in New York City 

EGftG - Princeton Applied ceremony at the home of the founded by her husband Mr. daughter of Mr and Mrs 
ResearchCo groom's father in William- Connors is an alumnus of the Peter Worhunsky ol 

Her husband, a graduate of stown University of Notre Dame and Terryville, Conn, to George 

Princeton High School who The bride is a graduate of did graduate work at UCLA. W. Bailey, son of Mr. and Mrs. 
attended Ashland College, is Caslelleja School in California After a trip to California the Herbert S. Bailey Jr. of 
employed as a laboratory and Mt Vernon Junior couple will live in Brooklyn Griggstown; September 8 in 
technician at Carter-Wallace College, Washington, DC Mr Heights, NY. Big Moose Chapel in Eagle 

Co Hoover attended Colorado Bay, NY. 

_ - — — College and is a botanist with Cullen-Wetterllng. Debra J. The bride and the groom 

Gale-AnaNe. Susan Anable, his own business in plant care Wetterling, daughter of Mr. both graduated with honors 
daughter of Mrs Margaret M an d landscaping in and Mrs. James E. Wetterling from the University of 
Arable and the late Charles E wiUiamstown Sr. of Edinburg, to Charles C. Rochester. Mrs. Bailey 

Anable of Princeton Junction, The coup|e are , iving ,„ Cu|len son of Mr and Mfs earned an RN and a BS in 
r i j, i ,1! oltar Williamstown and will take an Charles R. Cullen of nursing. She completed her 
Gale ana the late Margaret extended trip tnis w j nter t0 Lawrenceville; August 25 In MSN in psychiatric nursing at 
Gale of Elmira, NY.; south America where Mr. the First Presbyterian Church the University of North 
September 29 at Martha's Hoover will conduct research of Dutch Neck, the Rev. Carolina, Chapel Hill. Mr. 
Vineyard. Mass The Rev. inbegonias Kenneth B. Cragg and the Baile y holds an MS in 

physiological psychology from 
the University of California at 
San Diego. 

The couple will live in 
Chapel Hill where Mrs. Bailey 
is a nurse at Memorial 
Hospital and Mr. Bailey is a 
research assistant at the 
University. 



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162 Nassau Street • Princeton 
924-2561 



Bean-Johnson. Deborah A. 
Johnson, daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. Nicholas E. Johnson of 30 
Academy Street, Kingston, to 
Elmer P. Bean, son of Mr. and 
Mrs. John Bean of Newtown, 
Pa.; September 22 in St. 
Paul's Church, the Rev. 
Eugene Errickson officiating. 

Mrs. Bean is a graduate of 
South Brunswick High School 
and Middlesex County 
College. She also attended 
Montclair State College and is 
employed by Carter-Wallace 
Inc. at Wampole Laboratories 
in Princeton. 

Mr. Bean was graduated 
from Council Rock High 
School in Newtown, Pa. He is 
employed by Richard Wolfe's 
Original Musical Barn in 
Lumberville, Pa., and the 
Black Bass Hotel is Lum- 
berville. 

After a honeymoon to 
Barbados, the couple will live 
in West Trenton. 

Carpenter-Nethercut. Anne 
L. Nethercut, daughter of Dr. 
and Mrs. Philip E. Nethercut 
of Atlanta, Ga., to John B. 
Carpenter Jr., son of Mr. and 
Mrs John B. Carpenter of 94 
Darrah Lane, Lawrenceville; 
September 8 in St. Stephen's 
Episcopal Church, Mid- 
dlebury, Vt., the Rev. Harold 
Ca hill officiating. 

Mrs. Carpenter attended the 
University of Georgia and 
received a B.F.A. degree from 
the California College of Arts 
and Crafts. She was employed 
as an instructor of ceramics at 
the Atlanta Department of 
Parks and Recreation. 

Mr Carpenter, a 1977 
graduate of the University of 



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GARDEN MARKET 

Alexander Rd., Princeton 
609-452-2401 




Mayoralty Race 



the CPI, instead of limited to a 
rigid, five-percent increase. 

"Employment costs are 
such a large part of our 
,iwdget," he explained, "and 
there is no way we could have 
a salary increase as low as 
five and a half percent next 
year." 

Turning to another aspect of 
the financial problem, Mr. 
McChesney says he is con- 
cerned about easing the effect 
of revaluation on property- 
owners who may be hard hit. 
State taxation officials have 
not been much help, he says, 
in suggesting solutions. 

"We need to prepare for 
some kind of relief in hardship 
cases," he says, "if nothing 
else, to show that government 
cares." 

Transportation as part of 
the Borough's future interests 
Mr. Cawley keenly. 

"It's related to regional 
growth, the cost of gas, energy 
saving and traffic" he says, 
"and will be increasingly 
important in the next few 
years. A large number of 
workers in the CBD live in 
Borough or Township, for 
example, and they are 
potential mass-transportation 
customers. Yes, there is some 
inertia, but once people make 
the shift to public tran- 
sportation, they find it isn't as 
bad as they thought." 

The "Dinky" right-of-way 
between University Place and 
Princeton Junction, he points 
out, doesn't necessarily have 
to be used for a shuttle train. It 
could be used for bus tran- 
sportation "right up to the 
center of town." 

He sees transportation as 
important both within Prin- 
ceton, and as a regional 
problem to be worked on with 
towns around Princeton. 

-Katharine H. Bretnall 



Saturday, October 20, at 7 with 
cocktails and music at the 
residence of Gennv and Mike 
Lynch, 14 Yorktown Court. 
Smaller groups will move on 
to various homes for an Italian 
dinner, and meet for dessert 
with Jackie and Mike Good- 
man, 3 Woodmeadow Lane 

Among those hosting the 
dinners will be Sally and Carl 
Stillwell, Judy and Peter 
McCartin, and Carole and 
Allen McQuarrie. Door prizes 
will be given at the end of the 
evening. The cost is $20 per 
couple. For reservations, call 
Ginny Lynch, 799-1462, or 
Jackie Goodman, 799-3284 

Art in Princeton 

61 North Main Street in 



Cranbury Ms. Harr has been 
teaching art for many years in 
the Princeton area. 

Classes at the new studio 
begin Tuesday with an af- 
ternoon class from 1 to 4, 
"Drawing in Charcoal and Oil 
Painting," for beginners. This 
course will also be taught 
Wednesday mornings from 9 
to 12. Wednesday evening 
features an intermediate class 
from 7:30 to 10, "Do Your Own 
Thing." with class instruction 
and work in all mediums. 

Thursday afternoon a 
beginners class will be held 
from 1 to 4, "Introduction to 
Drawing and Oil Painting." 
This is a six-week course 
involving the basics of 
drawing in charcoal, oils, and 
watercolors. 



Ms. Harr is a graduate of 
the Central Park School of Art 
in New York and also studied 
portrait painting with Niccolo 
Cortigelia in Wilkesbarre, and 
Vincent Ceglia in Princeton. 
She is also a graduate of the 
John Pike Watercolor School 
in New Hampshire. 

The artist specializes in 
portraits in charcoal, 
watercolor, pastel and oils. 
The studio will be open week- 
days. For appointments and 
more information, call 655- 
2906. 

CHILDREN ARE TOPIC 
Of Photography Exhibit. An 
-exhibition of photographs by 
Micahel J. Mihalcik of 27 
Cleveland Lane, RD 4, 
honoring "The International 



Year of the Child," is on view 
through October 31 at the 
South Brunswick Public 
Library. 

The exhibit includes ap- 
proximately 30 photographs of 
children from all over the 
world, including India, 
Thailand, Hong Kong, Turkey, 
Italy, France, Mexico and 
most recently the Amazon. 

Mr. Mihalcik has taken over 
5,000 pictures in the last five 
years and has given his slide 
presentations to various 
Senior Citizens Clubs and 
classrooms in the area. The 
South Brunswick Public 
Library is located on Kingston 
Lane, Monmouth Junction, 
and is open daily 10 to 9 and 
weekends, 10 to 5. 



VILLAGE 

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Rocky Hill •921-7120 

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924-2865 




New Jersey Savings Bank 

180 Nassau St. Princeton, N.J. 08540 

Is The Only Bank In Town 

Offering All of These 
Services Under One Roof 









Weddings 



Georgia School of Environ- 
mental Design, is employed at 
the Vermont State Agency of 
Transportation. The couple 
will live in Montpelier, Vt. 

Steiner-DeAngelis. Diana 
M. DeAngelis, daughter of Mr. 
and Mrs. Albert DeAngelis of 
Groveville, to Robert Steiner, 
son of Mr and Mrs. Lloyd 
Steiner of Skillman; Sep- 
tember 1 in St. Paul's Church, 
the Rev. Evasio Marcellis 
officiating. 

Mrs. Steiner was graduated 
from Steinert High School and 
is employed by Applied Data 
Research in Princeton as an 
administrative assistant in the 
education department. Her 
husband is a graduate of 
Montgomery High School and 
is an Operator 2 at Princeton 
University. 

Following a honeymoon to 
Bermuda, the couple are 
living in Princeton Junction. 



Wheeler-Zito, Jayme R. 
Zito, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
James Zito of Fairless Hills, to 
John W. Wheeler, son of Mr. 
and Mrs. James Wheeler of 
Fort Meyers, Fla.; August 18 
in the Princeton University 
Chapel, the Rev. Dr. Frederic 
Fox officiating. 

The bride is a graduate of 
Pennsbury High School and 
Wilmington College, Ohio. Her 
husband is a graduate of 
Princeton High School and 
Rider College. After a wed- 
ding trip to Jackson Hole, 
Wyoming, they are living in 
Princeton. 



(Inhs & OrganhaAms 

Continued from Paoe 98 

The West Windsor 
Democratic Club will hold a 
progressive dinner party on 




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UnoeS 180 Nassau Street, Princeton, N.J. 08540 • 609-924-8434 u«*rfmc 



Minute Press 

Pnnceton Sr>opoir>o. Center 

921-7434 



BEVERAGE BARN 

Beef & Soil Dnnk. Outlet 
219Ct«rtlvlllaRd 
Pnncaton Junction 

799-2222 



Dr. Leon C. Nurock 
Optometrist 

84 Nassau St. 
Princeton 

For an appointment 
call 924-0918. 



Tiger Football Team, Trounced by Brown, Plans 
To Use Columbia as Turning Point in '79 Season 



Its hopes for a spectacular 
rise from the ashes sharply 
deflated but not destroyed, 
Princeton's football team will 
play its first home league 
game of the season Saturday 
at 1:30 in Palmer Stadium 
against Columbia. The Tigers 
are clear^ut favorites to even 
Frank Navarro's record 
against his former team, 
which won last year in New 
York. 14 to 10. 

The Orange and Black was 
mauled by Brown, 31-12, at 
Providence last Saturday 
because it was largely 
deficient in defense and 
kicking, the two factors that 
Navarro emphasizes are 
essential to winning football. 
The Bruins ran and passed for 
422 yards, mounting five 
drives from 51 to 80 yards for 
four touchdowns and a field 
goal, and their brand new 
quarterback, Frank 




PRINCETON 
POOL TABLES 

Sales and Service 
Rle 518 •Hopewell. N.J. 
466-1717 



R.F JOHNSON 

Electrical Contractor 
and Fixture Showroom 

20TulaneSl 924-0606 

OpenMon-Fn 8 to 5 



^ ^ T-~ * juiiiui uum hi i/di n. , riuim 

Ko4cV>aic<)3nV)9aX)3ff<)3fj carbone. outgained the more 

I SPORTS FANS £ experienced Steve Reynolds SETTING UP SEVEN POINTS: Middle guard Tim Mulvey haa 

fMaWh^^VHJf by a margin of well over 2 to 1. Just blocked Brown punt, which waa recovered for the Tlgara 

by delenalve back Mike Moran. Three playa later, Lou Vacarello 

| The measure of the victors' kicked a Held goal but when Bruins were offalde, Princeton 

x superiority was reflected in gave the three points back, gained the remaining yard for a flrat 

? their ability to slough off the down and i ntn ac0 red on a paaa from Stave Reynolds to Vlnce 

* effects of constant errors (14 Battaglla. (BUI Allen, photo) 
5 penalties, for an Ivy game 

jt record; two lost fumbles, a home team 16 The drive 

J blocked kick and an in- fizzled quickly, however, a 

jf terception), and still win with fumble forcing a 19-yard field 

1 very little difficulty. In the goal attempt on which Lou Cornell 

jf first half , their lead for a time Vacarello was wide to the left. Harvard 

9 was no more than 10-6, and Yale 

I shortly after the intermission, Brown then went 80 yards in Princeton 

1 it was 17-12, but they then 11 plays for its first score, Brown 

£ controlled the final 25 minutes stalled the Tigers out after the Columbia 

" completely. ensuing kickoff and settled for Darimou 

| For the second Saturday in a a 27-yard field goal after a p enn 

I row, it was clearly visible that penalty had erased an ap- 
parent touchdo' 




London Fog 

Zip Lined 
Lets You Laugh at the Weather 

Harry Ballot Co. 

20 Nassau 924-0451 

Since 1928 



New Jersey Fan Appreciation Day 

at Princeton's Palmer Stadium 

PRINCETON vs. COLUMBIA 

1:30 p.m. 

All residents of the stale ol New Jersey will be 
able to purchase a general admission ticket for 
just $2 by showing some form of identilication at 
the ticket window 

PRINCETON FOOTBALL - 
"Orange and Black Is Where the Action's At" 



IKN0W11T £ 

Brought to You 



by John Bernard 



1 Which is the only 
I National Football 
1 League team that 
| NEVER plays a home 
1 game in their home 
1 state** ... Answer is the 

1 New York Giants ... 

2 They play all their home 
1 games at Giant Stadium 
I in East Rutherford. 
I New Jersey. 

i One of the greatest 
I records ever made in 
1 college football was this 
1 one by Tennessee ... 
£ They once shut out their 
opponents in 17 CON- 
SECTIVE regular 
season games 
Imagine not letting any 
team score against you 
for 17 games in a row . 
Tennessee was n< 
scored on in any regular 
season game from Nov. 
5, 1938 through Oct. 12, 
1940. 

+++ 
"Without private 
coverage. Medicare 
Patients may have to 
pay more than half their 
doctor's bills and nearly * 
all of their bills for I 
drugs " - Wall Street 
Journal, 6-18-79. 
+ + + 
Here's one hard to a 
believe, but it's true A jj 
major-college football 



SPORTS 

In Princeton 



The f° ur games than it did a year 

blocked punt (Brown's third of a 8° odds are tetter than even 

the season) followed and that the Orange and Black can 

Reynolds passed to flanker win four straight - from 

Vince Battaglia from four Columbia, Colgate, Harvard 

yards out for the score. An and Pen ". an achievement 

unusual first-quarter try for a tnat would assure its first 

two-point conversion aborted s^«son al^v^.soo sMnce 1970. 
on an overthrown pass, and 




the better personnel was on Brown followed with its 

the other side of the football second TD - a 76-yard march 

from the Tigers. Brown has in a dozen plays that showed 

greater size and skill up front, clearly the difference between 

is far deeper in running backs, the two teams that afternoon, 
and generally had little The 17-6 halftime margin 

trouble in making good on the was quickly narrowed by the 

promise credited to Coach Tigers' final score when end 

John Anderson that as long as Steve Rowles recovered a 

he is at Brown, it will never fumble on the Bruin 12 and 

lose to Princeton He is now 7 sophomore fullback Larry 

and against the frustrated Van Pelt erased that yardage 

Tigers with a burst up the middle. 

Again, a pass for two points 

Carbone a Surprise. After was overthrown 

having thrown one varsity 

pass last year as a sophomore, The losers never threatened 

Carbone injured his hand seriously again, yielding two 

before the opener with Yale, more touchdowns to run the 

sat that out while the Bruins total of points posted against 

were losing, 13-12, and had them in their last two games 

only about 25 minutes of play to 67. The pressure of opening 

under his belt in a one-sided with three of the toughest 

romp over Rhode Island, games on their schedule, two 

„ Against Princeton, he turned away from home, was a factor 

a in the kind of statistics that in defeat, but the loss was 

had been hoped for from the clearly based on Brown's 

more experienced Reynolds: superior team playing the 

10 for 16 and 156 yards better football, 
passing, plus 50 more on the The Bruins' problem in the 



coach once insisted that tf ground Reynolds, harried all 1979 i V y race is that they have 
officials TAKE AWAY a £ afternoon by the Bruins' big lost the only game a team 



jj touchdown from his 
I team because be noticed 
I a penalty which the 

5 officials missed ... It 

6 happened when the 
" legendary Amos Alonzo 
i Stagg was coaching ... 
% Stagg was so strict, he 

« wouldn't accept a touch- 
down bis team scored 
when he knew they had 
committed a penalty on 
that play 



STURHAHN 
Dickenson 
& Bernard 

14 Nassau St. 
Tel. 921-6880 



ged but 98 hoping to win the cham- 

yards in the air and none on pionship can afford They will 

the ground Cns Crissy spent almost certainly not drop 

an equally tough afternoon another, but Yale at this point 

with a mere 55 yards in 10 is clearly stronger than its 

ca £T es _ u ^ ,. ■ ,. remaining opponents, and the 

The Tigers had a bright Blue can still lose one and be 

opportunity to take an early assured of finishing in a first- 

f?,nl£ hen ,L he> ' recov " e 1 d » Place tie with the Brums 
fumble on the opening kickoff 

and shook Crissy loose on the Despite the one-sided losses 

first play for 21 yards to the to Rutgers and Brown, 

■■■jBaajejBjejejjaajejaajjajajj, Princeton is markedly better 

ivy League Forecast °" than it was a year ago, 

when it had only a tie with 

Pnnceion over Columbia, r inert Cornell to show after three 

ground games. The Tigers' bright 

vale over Dartmouth E ,<<pr ,., start at Hanover has, 

however, been diminished - at 






Penn. By 



Cornell over Harvard. Cnmsr 

La it Week 

Record to Date 

Wong- 444 



least insofar as evaluating the 
strength of the Ivy league this 
fall. Dartmouth has managed 
only a tie in its first three 
games and is nowhere near 
the ability that its league 
champions displayed last fall. 
Princeton, on the other 
hand, has a solid chance of 
achieving far more in its next 



Walk like a duck. 

You never hear a duck squawk about being wet or cold. That's because 
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Princeton Football 



Columbia Has Problems. A 
26-7 victim of Harvard in its 
opener (before the Crimson 
lost its top two quarterbacks 
through injuries), Columbia 
•X6n dropped a 14-7 decision to 
Lafayette but edged Penn last 
week, 12-7, missing both 
pats., as did Princeton The 
Lions graduated 25 lettermen 
from the team that was 3-1-1- 
after five games last fall but 
then dropped its final four. 

They have settled on junior 
Bob Conroy as their quar- 
terback, even switching senior 
Larry Biondi to halfback and 



QUICK LOOK AT COLUMBIA 

OFFENSE: Still slrugglmg-26 
points in ihree games Quar- 
terback a junior, best 
Dacks sophomores 
DEFENSE: Errors being eliminated 
and showing improvemenl. but is 
somewhat undermanned 
CHIEF ASSET: Eagerness 10 do 
well despite numerous problems 
generally go all out lor 
"' Coach Bill Campbell 
CHIEF PROBLEM: Lack ol lop- 
llight personnel, combined with 

II shortage in deplh 
TYPE OF ATTACK: Multiple with 
Veer 



using sophomores Joe 
Cabrera and Ron Sydnor with 
him as their chief ball 
carriers. Conroy is not an 
impressive passer, and will 
come into the game with a 
completion average of 40 
percent Against Penn, he was 
picked off four times. 

Defensively, only four 
lettermen returned and the 
inexperience at linebacker is 
considerable. Last year's 
freshmen were 1-5, adding to 
the manpower problems. 

Princeton is about to begin 
the second third of its 
schedule, facing opponents of 
considerably less stature than 
the teams it has already 
played. If the Tigers are to 
leave the ranks of the also- 
rans, and use them as step- 
ping stones to the land of 
respectability, the time is at 
hand. 

-Donald C.Stuart 

TWO MORE WINS 
For PHS Field Hockey 
Team. The Princeton High 
School field hockey team and 
goalie Nancy Pesce recorded 
two shutouts last week, as the 
Little Tigers blanked 
Hamilton, 1-0, and Ewing, 4-0, 
on successive days. Their 
record is now 6-1-1. 

Courtney Hoff's unassisted 
goal in the first half was the 
only score in the Hamilton 



Tiger Soccer Team Edges Brown, 2 to 1; 
Winning Margin Comes on Goal by Goalie 

Pitchers have hit grand slams, defensive football players 
have run the length of the field for a touchdown, but how 
often does a soccer goalie score a goal? 

Princeton's Jamie Brickell did, Friday night in 
Providence as the Tigers were beating Brown, 2-1. The 
highly-unusual play came when he punted the ball high in 
the air with a strong wind at his back 

The ball sailed well over half the length of the field, 
landed about 20 yards in front of the Brown goal and 
bounced over the head of the Brown goaUe. who had come 
out to meet it because a Tiger forward had slipped in behind 
the defense Once over the head of the goalie, the ball had 
enough momentum left to roll over the line. The losers' 
score, which came on a penalty kick with three minutes left, 
was the first recorded against Brickell in five games this 
fall. 

The 6-0 Tigers will meet Columbia, defending Ivy League 
champion, Saturday at 11 on Bedford Field, just west of 
Washington Road. 



Day School even at 2-2 in its 
soccer game Monday with 
Hun and neither team was 
able to score again, through 
double overtime. Tom Von 
Oehsen got the Panthers' 
other score early in the game, 
while Hun's goals were 
credited to Phil Franzoni and 
PaulPattory. 

PDS will play this Wed- 
nesday afternoon at home 
against Pingry and will travel 
to Hightstown Saturday to 
facePeddie After five games, 
its record is 1-2-2. 




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game Hornet goalie Cindy 
Kornetti was credited with 10 
saves, while Pesce was tested 
only once. 

The PHS defense made it 
just as easy for Pesce against 
Ewing Again she had only one 
save while her teammates 
were peppering the Ewing 
goalie with 48 shots. 

Missy McCloskev scored 
one for PHS, her '.4th this 
season and 23rd career goal. 
She is only six behind the 
single season mark of 20 held 
by Cathy Tomlinson and only 



one shy of the PHS career 
record of 24 held jointly by 
Tomlinson and Amy Leasing. 

Also scoring for the Little 
Tigers were Lee Ann 
Chamberlain, Monique Muri 
and Lori Lehnert. PHS will 
play Notre Dame next on 
Thursday and on Monday 
entertain Hopewell Valley, the 
only team to defeat the Blue 
and White this season. 




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S CHS HOSTS HIGHTSTOWN 

~. In First CVC Test. Pnn- 

- ceton High School has won two 
5 of its first three football 
g games, after defeating Hun 
•- List week. 19-6. on the strength 
o of three big plays. 
> So much for the preliminary' 
2 season The more important 
w 'second season" starts 
z Saturday when the Little 
S Tigers play host to Hightstown 

* in their first Colonial Valley 
-i Conference game Kickoff is 

* Uam 

z 

S "It should be a good game." 

o said PHS coach Jim Beachell. 

| It should be pretty even - I GOOD DAY FOR NO. 40: Junior wlngback Steve Budd, who ran the opening 
a- hope, kickoff back 73 yards for a touchdown, la shown here carrying for a first down 

» it will depend on the against Hun after taking a short pass from quarterback Dave Dinella. Budd 

- defense how well we play enjoyed his best offensive game of the season, rushing for 46 yards In 10 
o That s where our inexperience carries 

z 1S " 

It sounds easy But it was Then in the third period, singled out linebacker Chris 

P. Because the CVC league far from easy for the favored after the PHS defense forced a Gabrielsen. "He had a fan- 
comprises only five games for Little Tigers Particularly in Hun punt, Miles returned it to tastic game. He tore 'em up 
each member, a single loss is the first half when winless the Hun 35. On the next play. He had an unbelievable 
damaging to any team's Hun (0-3) scored to battle its Dinella and Petrone, who had numberof tackles." 
chances And because Notre visitors to a 6-6 standoff at little to cheer about in the Joining Gabrielsen at 
Dame appears to be intermission. Hun had the Ewing game, teamed up on a linebacker is Ian Broad- 
noticeably stronger than the better of it offensively on the perfect strike Petrone was in water Cedeno, Mark Adams 
others and is favored to win muddy playing surface. the clear down the sideline - and David Yim are the 

the crown again, two CVC due to a missed coverage defensive halfbacks and 

losses can be considered fatal "We looked terrible," said assignment, according to Hun Petrone the free safety. 

Beachell may also have to Beachell "I think the players coach Dave Leete - and -Preston Eckmeder 

go without his starting felt they played such a good Dinella's toss was right on 

fullback in this key matchup game last week, they never target. "An excellent pass. It PANTHERS. RAIDERS TIE 
Brian Varvel suffered a thought it was going to be 6-6 opened up the game for us," In Swamp Battle. Under 
partially dislocated shoulder at the half said Beachell. This time Budd sunny skies that gave no hint 
in the Hun contest and his "What problems there were, split the uprights for a 13-6 of the soggy turf underneath, 
playing status is a question we cancelled," continued lead Princeton Day and Pen- 
mark For backups, Beachell Beachell Mainly, PHS started nington battled to an 8-8 

has Larry McKeller and Mark tokey on Hun back Rob Clark, A little gamble with less deadlock last Saturday. The 

Bessire- two sophomores the PC from Doylestown, Pa., than three minutes left sewed tie left the Panthers still 

who tore through the PHS it up for PHS. On a fourth undefeated this season with a 

Both Teams 2-1. Like PHS, defense for 104 yards in 19 down, needing two from the 3-0-1 mark. 

Hightstown has a 2-1 record, carries. He had scored Hun's Hun 45, PHS decided to go for The on and off rain last 

After being shocked by lone tally, knifing off tackle it. Miles, who had been held in week, capped by Friday af- 

Lawrence in their opener, the from three yards out to cap a check by the mud and keying ternoon's downpour, did not 

Rams have defeated Allen- 47-yard, 10-play drive that Hun defense, burst off tackle allow the two schools to play 

town and. last week, began with a Matt Roach and cut to his right. Once their scheduled Friday night 

McCorristin 27-6 Both interception of Dave Dinella clear, there's no stopping him. contest at Princeton 

Allentown, which PHS edged pass. Later, Leete agreed that University. They met instead 

7-6. and McCorristin have yet Princeton's opening TD "took the next day on the PDS field, 

to win this season. At that, Hun barely sue- some spark out of us - for a a piece of real estate not noted 

Ram coach Don Colbert ceeded in scoring its first TD little while. By halftime, it for very good drainage. 

reports his team's defense has of the season Following a first was behind us." 

been consistent but the offense down by Clark on the PHS The sloppy turf hampered 

has suffered from too many four, three cracks at the Field conditions also hurt a both teams' offenses, leaving 

mistakes That shaky offense middle of the Little Tiger line little bit, Leete added (Hun is both coaches thinking of what 



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ack against netted one yard. primarily a running team) 

McCorristin, though, as the "One more time," exhorted "and in the second 
Rams outrushed the Iron PHS tackle Eric Vieland. half they started 

Mikes. 249 yards to 50. Gark, however, squirted over keying on my full- 
Leading the rush for the Rams standing upThe snap for the back."' Despite the 
was junior Charlie Holmes He extra point conversion sailed extra attention PHS began 
carried for 139 yards in 29 over the holder's head and the playing Clark, Leete corn- 
carries and two touchdowns, game was even at 6. mented that "he had a nice 

The battle shapes up as a Hun was driving again just game" 
duel between Holmes and before intermission Clark Hun will try to get that first 
Princeton's Paul Miles, who knifed up the middle for 26 win Saturday when it plays 
had his second 100-yard game yards and only a saving tackle host to Blair Academy in a 
against Hun. rushing for 110 by Tony Cedeno prevented 2:30contest. 

yards in 15 carries. another score. 

Beachell, in turn, cited the 

3 Plavs. 3 Scores. Three big Budd. Bang. M. Despite the running of Budd. "He's 
plays -a 73-yard return of the mudd y" sll PPery surface, starting to learn how to run 
opening kickoff by Steve Budd gathered in the opening it," he said. "He's working 
Budd a 35-yard scoring strike luckotf and raced down field, hard. When he runs well and 
fromDave Dinella to Judd "' saw an opening right up the defense is keying on Miles, 
Petrone and a 45-yard off tne mi<1 dle, ne sa ' Q " No one '' ma kes our counter game 
tackle slant by Miles - and 8" 1 a t*"" 1 on me ' couldn't go." 
PHS had a l« win over Hun. believe it" On defense. Beachell 



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Sports iii Princeton 

Continued from precox M9e 

complished on a dry field The 
muddy conditions pleased no 
one, and neither did the tie 

In fact, except for what both 
poaches labeled "defensive 
' breakdowns," the final game 
might well have been 
scoreless Pennington tallied 
first, when its outstanding 
junior halfback Archie 
Peterson capped a first period 
drive with a 21-yard dash into 
the end zone. 

PDS coach Jim Walker felt 
a mistake by one of his 
defensive backs in committing 
himself to the inside allowed 
Peterson to go all theway. The 
Red Raiders then used a trick 
play to score a two-point 
conversion, setting up for a 
kick, but snapping the ball to ' 
Peterson who ran the ball in. 



Tigers Sweep Tennis 
Led by Princeton 
resident Jay Lapidus. who 
won the A Division singles 
title for the third year in a 
row, Princeton Univer- 
sity's tennis team caputred 
its seventh consecutive 
ECAC Fall Championship 
here last weekend. 

Lapidus disposed of 
Harvard's Don Pompan, S- 
2. 7-6. in the finals of his 
division and then teamed 
with Leif Shiras to win the 
doubles from John Steele 
and Greg Hartman of 
Dartmouth, 6-3. 6-1. The 
Tigers' total of 43 points 
was 9 better than Harvard 
in the final standings as 
they recorded their 13th 
victory in this event in the 
last 18 years. 



PDS Retaliates. It was the 

Panthers' turn in the second 
period. Stopping Pennington 
on a fourth and one on their 
own 30, PDS drove 70 yards in 
11 plays for the equalizer. Neil 
Munroe who played a superb 
game passed to John Denny 
for good yardage during the 
drive. 

Working from a first down 
inside the Pennington 10-yard 
line, PDS gained nothing on 
two running plays and then 
was hit with an illegal motion 
penalty, giving it a third and 
goal from the 13. Munroe this 
time found tight end Tim 
Murdoch open in the end zone 
for the score with just 55 
seconds left in the half. 

Needing a two-point con- 
version to tie, Munroe ran 
around the left side of the 
Pennington line and muscled 
his way into the end zone. 



The second half saw both 
defenses and the mud play the 
major roles. Pennington came 
up with the most promising 
effort, but was finally turned 
away after getting inside the 
Panthers' 10. 

A roughing the kicker 
penalty on PDS near midfield 
allowed the Red Raiders to 
keep their drive alive, and 
shortly thereafter their 
quarterback found a receiver 
behind the last PDS defender. 
Wide receiver Mike Hanson 
caught the pass, but stumbled 
and fell on the PDS 10-yard 
line. 

The Blue and White buckled 
down at that point, with Mike 
Dobkowski making a key 
tackle. Pennington thought 
about a field goal too long, got 
hit with a delay of game 
penalty, and finally threw an 
incomplete pass on fourth 
down. 



In the fourth quarter, the 
visitors got close enough to try 
a field goal, but it mav have 
been intended as a trick play 
and luckily Munroe was there 
to cover the ball on the PDS 
three-yard line, as it is a free 
ball once it goes beyond the 
line of scrimmage. 

The Panthers' offense, 
which outgained Pennington 
in total yards, did not mount 
much of a threat in the second 
half Munroe was the offensive 
star, gaining 95 yards on the 
ground, passing for 54. and 
receiving passes for 34. Billy 
Haynes gained 62 yards in five 
carries. 

On defense, Walker cited the 
play of Murdoch, who led the 
team in tackles, his two 
defensive ends, Mike Leahy 
and Jeff Freda, and 
Dobkowski at cornerback. 

This Friday at 3, PDS will 
meet Academy of New Church 
at home. New Church is 3-1 on 
the season. The following 
week PDS will journey to 
Wardlaw for what should be 
the showdown for the New 
Jersey Prep League title. 

20th GOAL SCORED 
By Sue Mooney at PHS. Sue 
Mooney's 18th, 19th and 20th 
goals of the season last week 
led the Princeton High School 
girls soccer team to a 3-2 
victory over Ewing and its 
sixth win in eight games. 

Ewing's Donna Severino 
scored the game's first goal 
but Mooney quickly tied it at 1 . 
A goal by Shelly Winters gave 
Ewing the lead again in the 
second period. Mooney tied it 
once more on a 20-yard bullet 
in the same period. 

Thirty-eight seconds into the 
third quarter, Mooney gave 
PHS the lead for the first time i 



when she scored on a 30-yard 
direct kick after being trip- 
ped The last period was 
scoreless. 

PHS is ranked third in the 
area behind Hamilton (7-0) 
andSteinert (5-1), the only two 
teams to defeat the Little 
Tigers this year Mooney's 20 
goals put her on top in the 
individual scoring race She is 
trailed by Elyse Eichman ( 19) 
and Mary Ann Brodowski 
117). both of Hamilton A 
junior. Mooney scored 29 goals 
as a sophomore and ten in her 
freshman year. 

PHS will next play Notre 
Dame away on Thursday and 
play host to rival Princeton 
Day School on Monday at 4. 



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CELESTIN SIDELINED 



in the Hun game, as in 
previous games when Celestin 
has been forced to depart, "we 
looked terrible with Ron not in 
there. We had a total let down. 

School soccer team will have "w 1 " 

to answer the question: Can it . , .... 

win without its leader and The Celest.n^less Little 
scoring standout. Ron Tigers will be tested earljN 
Celestin As PHS coach Ed Thursday they w,^ 1 e nte rta.n 
Beacham indicated above, it No re Dame at . 3.45 at I the 
sn'tgoingtobeeasy S.^ ^ bT'a, 

Celestin was hurt early in Pennington School and on 
the second period in Sa?ur- M°nday «it Hopewel 1 Valley 
davs game with Hun School in The latter and Notre Dame 
which Hun went on to upset are league contests 
r the Little Tigers. 4-2 Celestin _ 

had scored before he left to u Fr '" on ' * Fr "T nl : Jor 

; give PHS a 1-0 lead but the Hun. the Franzoni brother^ 

' onlv score the Little Tigers got Garrett and Paul, each scored 

I after that came off a kick by once and teammates Gerry 

I Dan Rnnel Barbero and Greg Otto also 

' Matin has been bothered scored as Hun (M) handed 

bv two bad knees, the left in PHS its second loss in eight 

particular 'Just about every games Hun outshot PHS on its 

me he gets a shot and he has uddy field. 14-8 



Tiger Freshmen Win. 14-0 
A pair of second-half 
touchdowns gave the 
Princeton freshman 
football team a 14-0 
triumph Sunday over 
Dartmouth '83 in a game 
played in Palmer Stadium. 
Both scores were made by 
tailback Roland Warren, 
the first from a yard out 
and the second on a 12-yard 
shot around right end just 
seconds before the clock 
ran out. 

Brent Woods was the 
Princeton quarterback, 
playing the entire game, in 
contrast to the four dif- 
ferent players who served 
as signal-callers for the 
visitors. On defense, tackle 
Earl Simpson stood out for 
the victors with four 
quarterback sacks 

Coach Dan White's 1983 
team will play Columbia 
Saturday at II on Finney 
Field, adjacent to Palmer 
Stadium, as its second 
opponent. 



powered West Windsor to a 21- 
victory last week over 
win) ess Allen town. 

Errors by both teams kept 
the scoring down in the first 
half One Allentown mistake 
led to West Windsor's first TD 
in the second period. The 
Redbirds lost the ball on a 
poor snap on a punting 
situation, allowing West 
Windsor's best running back. 
Mel Cote, to score a short time 
later from seven yards out 

The Pirates (2-1) enjoyed a 
big edge in rushing, 
outgaining Allentown, 246 to 69 
yards on the ground. Cote had 
119of those in 16 carries West 
Windsor will play powerful 
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PDS NOW 6-0 
In Girls Tennis. The Prin- 
ceton High School girls tennis 
team defeated Ewing, 4-1, last 
week to run its record to 6-0. 

The Little Tigers will be 
busy next week. Coach Bill E 
Humes reports the state fr 
tournament competition will 
begin soon and PHS will also 
play matches with Trenton E 
. Earlier in the week, PHS their team's tackles First this Wednesday, Lawrence on r 
..ilirS >nv "heller " said blanked McCorristin. 1-0, on a National's most successful Fri day and Hopewell Valley; 5 
Rear-ham Celestir was taken Celestin goal in the final offensive plays came on on Monday. Trenton is the 
fn the Princeton Medical period with seven minutes left quarterback scrambles by only home contest. 

to the Princeton Medical £ 0wen Kellner who ^shed for 

Center alter me Hu n game PHS dominated the play in over40yards. Both Muffy Ellis and Diane 

Bather than risk further the first three periods and Fuel Oils offense was led by Aronovic won their singles 
Jurvto Ce?«tin BMcnam outshot the losers. 24-14. The Jerry Ellis who gained 150 ma tches for PHS against 
tas^ecfcdrBttoolavhimfor shutout was goalie, Brent yards on only seven carries. Ewing "Aronovic has a nice 
,h fnSthr« tc ?fi« !Zb Robinsons third "Both teams Elliott Liverman rushed for streak going She hasn't been 
"Givehim a couple weeks rest played well but I think we one touchdown and also in- beaten in two to three years in 
and hope he can come back for *" e the better team 
the last third of the season and Beacham commented 

the nlavnffs " he said "Bv Attempts are being made 10 i^aai ><=«. » tna...|/. u .., sen ior. 
then we'll also have a full reschedule Thursday's rained- Mengle-McCabe, erupted for Melanie Goldfeld and Julie 
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The Lions held their opponents as aid juniors Liza Reed and 
TPA TOPS HILTON in the first half as consecutive Leah Cope, the number two 

In Midget Football. Travel runs by David Bush of 34 and pairing "Reed is playing very 
Planning Associates came 22 yards tied the score 6-6 at we n, she's very aggressive at 
back from a 6-0 deficit to intermission. the net," said Humes, 

defeat Hilton Realty, 12-6, last Mengle-McCabe's big of- Princeton's lone loss oc- 
week in Princeton Midget tensive line began opening curre d in the number one 
Football League action. TPA holes in the Lion defense in the Angles wne re Patty Dinella, 
capitalized on four fumble second half as both Scott after splitting the first two 
recoveries and one in- Fisher and David Haynes continued on next page 

terception return for a touch- averaged better than six 
down. Outside linebacker yards per carry. Other 
Darryl Hemingway picked off Mengle-McCabe offensive 
a Marv Trotman pass and stand-outs included Troy Hill 
scampered 36 yards to tie the and Mike Taylor, while Louis 
score shortly after Jon Davila played an exceptional 
Abrahams of Hilton had game on defense. 

turned right end for a 26-yard 

touchdown. ALLENTOWN BLANKED 

Hilton's offense churned out By West Windsor Eleven. 
impressive yardage on Two last period scores, a four-' 
several drives but was var d keeper by quarterback 
stymied by TPA's "big play" Bill Schwing that culminated 
defense After recovering a a 50-yard drive, and a 33-yard 

Hilton fumble deep in Hilton SCO ring pass from John 

territory. TPA finally got its Bri e nza to Pete Bahr, 

offense moving, as Tim Best 

slanted seven yards off tackle 

for the winning score. 
TPA's top players of the 

game included Darryl 

Hemingway. Chris Goodyear 

(two sacks and a fumble 

recovery) and Tim Best who 

had three unassisted tackles 

and two fumble recoveries. 
In the senior division, 

Princeton Fuel Oil jumped off 

to an early lead over First 

National Bank and went on for 

a 19-0 win. On the third play 

from scrimmage, Peter Ross 

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B*st Frwnnq • RMforihg 
Art & Esuf Aocmaats 

Kalen's Fine Art 

Since 1886 
73 Palmer Sq 924-0740 



THE 
NICKEL 

lUII Slate Kd (Rte.206> 

924-3001 



PUNT, PASS AND KICK WINNERS 
petition held at Community Park are 
Hunninghake, 154 Dodds Lane, 1 0-y 
champion. Absent were Scoti Shaft. 
Robin Drive. Skillman. 1 2-year old wi 



^i.iiiy 



; of the annual Punt. Pass and Kick i 
•om lelt Carl Hoyler II, 35 Fmley Road. 9-year old winner. Michael 
ar old winner; and Tom Hsggerty. 60 Wiltmer Court. 13-year old 
1 10 Crooked Tree Lane. 8-year old winner, and Tom Newton. 22 
ner Hunninghake. victor as an 8 and 9-year old. is the first back- 



to-back winner since PP&K competition began in 1961. At right is George Conover. president ol 
Nassau-Conover Motor Company. Route 206. and at left are Bruce 'Jefferson and Jim Kopliner. co- 
ordinators of the PP&K competition for Nassau-Conover. The PP&K is sponsored by the National 
Football League and the Ford Dealers of America. 



Sports in Princeton 



sets, became ill, and 
defaulted. 

REGISTER NOW 
For Youth Basketball. The 
YMCA is accepting 
registration for the November 
start of the Youth Basketball 
Association. 

YBA is a concept developed 
by the YMCA and the National 
Basketball League Players 
Association to give boys and 
girls an opportunity to play in 
a basketball league in which 
yinning is not the most im 



Three Advance in PP&K 
Three of the five from 
this area who competed 
Saturday in the Punt, Pass 
and Kick zone competition 
held at Rancocas Valley 
High School in Mount Holly 
won and will advance to the 
PP&K district competition 
to be held Saturday, 
October 20, at St. Joseph's 
College in Philadelphia. 

Advancing were Carl 
Hoyler II, 9; Michael 
Hunninghake, 10, and Tom 
Newton, 12. 



Airon Graphics and Nassau 
Hobby & Crafts battled to a 1-1 
portant aspect. The four main tie. Ernie Soffronoff scored for 
components of YBA are Airon while Brian Lloyd 
developing basketball skills, tallied for the opposition. 

fair play, values and having 

fun. The rules are that no one 
is cut, everyone must play at 
least half of each game and no 
standings are kept. 



Talk, "St. Cecilia; A Stained 
Glass Panel by Sir Edward 
Burne-Jones," Mariana 
Berry; Princeton Art 
Museum. Also on Sunday at 
3. 

7:30-11:30 p.m.: International 
Folk Dancing, World Folk- 
dance Cooperative; 185 
Nassau Street. 

8 p.m.: Bluegrass concert 
with the Katie Laur Band, 
sponsored by Folk Music 
Society ; All Saints' Church. 

8:30 p.m.: Art Auction, benefit 
Trinity Church; 33 Mercer 
Street. 

8:30 p.m.: Concert, University 
Orchestra, Micahel Pratt, 
conductor, Judith Nicosia, 
soprano, Christopher 
Cameron tenor; Alexander 
Hall. 

8:30 p.m.: Brecht, "The 
Visions of Simone Machard," 
McCarter Repertory 
Company; McCarter 
Theatre. Also on Saturday 
and on Sunday at 2:30 and 
7:30. 



TENNIS TOURNAMENT 
At County Level. The 

Mercer County Women's 
Singles tennis tournament will 

The YBA program will beheld this month, starting ion 
begin on November 17. Wednesday, October 17 at the 
Players will be placed on Mercer county Indoor T««us 
teams which will meet once or g"*£ Deadline for entries is 
twice a week for practice. * . , . . .„ , 
Games will be on Saturdays, The entr / fee 1S « plus a 
starting in December. " ew . «» ,<?' J 1 ? 1 ' * Slazinger 

All coaches are trained by ' e " n,s balls Any resident of 
nationally certified YBA M f «* Count y * el f8 lb "; a ,"f See 
directors in the areas of value -trants may «£*** „ am .. 5 pn} . } 5th Annual 

Road in West Trenton. 



Saturday, October 20 

a.m. -2:45 p.m.: YWCA 

Workshop seminar, "The 

Second Half of Your Life"; 

YM-WYCA, Paul Robeson 



and fair play. Anyone 
terested in coaching or 
registering a player between 
the ages of 8 and 12 should call 
the YMCA at 924-4825. 



Calendar 



Dollhouse & Miniature Show 
& Sale to benefit Family & 
Children's Service of Mon- 
mouth County; Holiday Inn, 
Tinton Falls. 

11 a.m.: Soccer, Rutgers vs. 
Princeton; Bedford Field. 



FOUR SHUTOUTS POSTED 
Li Bantam Soccer League. Friday. October 19 

In the Bantam league of the 8:30-11:30 a.m.: French 1 ;, 3 ,° pm , * 

Princeton Soccer Association Flower Market, the Garden 

last week Punchinello blanked Club of Princeton ; minipark 

Terhune Orchards, 3to0, on a oppositie TOWN TOPICS: 

hat trick by Chris Ridzon, Nassau and Mercer Streets. 

strong goaltending by Chris 12:30 p.m.: Museum Break 

Wei and fine defensive play by 



Princeton; Palmer 
Stadium. 

10:30 p.m.: Delayed Tape of 
Colgate-Princeton Football 
Game ; Channels 23 and 52. 



Harris Tweed: 

The one that out -classics 

them all. 



We impoi 

Hams Tweed . . .dyed, 

spun, handwoven and 

finished in the Outer 

Hebrides ol Scotland 

We then have the sport 

coats tailored to our 

specifications. . . .pure 

natural shoulder styling, 

for a classic look that will 

outlast the coat itself. 

Our Hams Tweed sport coat, $ 1 85 



Sh.r English Shop ^ 





609 924 7100 



Free Parking 
Open Fridays Until 9 p.m. 



Dylan Thurston and Jorge 
Franco. Woodwinds shut out 
Firestone Real Estate, 1 to 0, 
on David Ragsdale's score, 
assisted by Matt Lubas. Both 
teams played an excellent 
defensive game. 

Two goals by Mark 
Mathews and one by Rob 
Jensen paced Hulit's to a 3 to 
win over John Henderson Real 
Estate, while King's Grant 
was blanked by Cox's, 3 to 0, 
on goals by Jeff Stovall and 
Jonathan Malkiei. Michael 
King had two assists. 

The Princeton U-Store 
scored five times on goals by 
Stephen Pollard and three by 
Ted Kirschner, and Cord 
Johnston and Hans Bitter 
played a strong game as the 
U-Store topped the Pottery 
Barn, 5 to 2. Aaron Cooper 
scored for the losers. 

Z & W Honda edged FMC 
Corp. 2 to 1. Stevie Eaton and 
Jennifer Wolinetz tallied for 
the winners, assisted by Kevin 
Spaeth. Robert Baird scored 
the lone goal for the losers. 



Bill Starr has been working for Princeton: 

transportation • environment • bridges • open space • parks • preservation • planning 




Planning: Bill Starr is practical. He saw 
that a proposed sewer project was 
expensive and environmentally un- 
sound. As a member of the Sewer 
Authority, he was the first to urge that it 
be dropped - which it was. Your tax 
money was saved. 



BILL STARR FOR PRINCETON TOWNSHIP COMMITTEE 

Bill Starr has earned your vote 



« « WW WW V *»»i** " * 



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> Bl'S TRIP PUNNED 

~. To \>» F»U Foliigf . The 
S YMCA Association is spon- 
5 soring a trip to Silver Bay. 
g N Y . north oif Lake George, to 
g view fall foliage. 

The group will stay in a 

> YMCA hotel for three nights 
g from October 14-17. The cost is 
*$115 per person, double oc- 
zcupancy and includes all 
2 meals and transportation. For 
* further information and 
-reservations call Jenny 

1 Cortese Jackson. 924-4787 
z 

FtOWER SHOW A HIT 
u More Than 300 Attend. 

| From the giant staghom fern 
a- of a Princeton school board 
g member to the tiniest 
j arrangement by a Rumson 
o resident. Princeton's first 

2 community fall flower show in 
S 30 years reflected a wide 
2 variety of plants and exhibits 

Sponsored by the Stony 
Brook Garden Club and the 
Garden Club of Princeton the 
flower show was held in 
Pierce Hall in Trnity Church. 
More than 300 from New 
Jersey and neighboring states 
attended. "We were delighted 
with the number of entries and 
visitors." said Mrs. Edward 
Rose, co-chairman of the 
event with Mrs Moore Gates 
Jr 

Mrs. A.V.S. Olcott of 
Hopewell won the cut-leaf 
Japanese maple tree donated 
by Woodwinds Associates to 
the person accumulating the 
most points in the horticulture 
division Mrs Robert Hack- 
man of the Pla infield Garden 
Club won Best in Show for 
artistic design in horticulture, 
and Mrs Walter Clough of 
Rumson for the flower 
arrangement classes 

First prize winners in the 
arrangement classes were 
Mrs John Pontius of the 
Contemporary Garden Club 
for "All Things Bright and 
Beautiful' Mrs. Alan Carrick 
of the Garden Club of Prince- 
ton for "Hurricane Season"; 
Mrs. E C Rose of the same 



club for "Ivy League"; and 
Mrs L. M. Delafield of the 
Stony Brook Garden Hub for 
"Indian Summer" There 
were II prize winners in "Far 
Out." the junior class (2nd 
through 12th graders) with 
firsts going to Chris Connor 
and Bevin Ashenfelter, a fifth- 
grader who also won a Best in 
Show. 

In the horticulture division, 
there were 50 classes and 
many blue ribbons. Mrs. 
Harleston Hall. Jr. of the 
Stony Brook Garden Club won 
Best in Show for a small 
begonia hybrid, while Mrs. 
A.F. Austin of the same club 
won a first in the artistic 
design class for "This is my 
Garden " _ 

VAN VISIT DUE 

To Recycle Aluminum. The 
Reynolds Aluminum 
Recycling van will be at the 
Princeton Shopping Center on 
Tuesday from 12 : 30 to 1 : 30. 

Residents will be paid 23 
cents a pound for all- 
aluminum beverage cans and 
other household aluminum 
products. The company 
recommends testing cans with 
a magnet to make sure they 
are recyclable all-aluminum. 

WHERE ARE YOU? 

PHS Class of 1965. The 
Princeton High School Class of 
1965 is planning to hold its first 
reunion - its 15th --next June, 
with a picnic in the afternoon 
and a dinner-dance in the 
evening. 

The reunion committee 
members have sent a letter to 
all former classmates for 
whom they have been able to 
obtain an address. Class 
members who would like to 
attend and have not received a 
letter or been contacted 
should call one of the following 
committee members. 

Johnny and Michael Hill, 
921-6840, Bruce Jefferson, 921- 
7236; Lesley Bush, 921-0223; 
Penny Edwards Carter, 924- 
7289: Dianne Weber Bleacher, 
921-8128; Sandy Stahl 
Tsanglis, 921-7877; Mark 
Kasrel, 799-3626; Pat Rhodes 
Jackson, 924-6219; Paul 
Walstad. 466-3260; or Albie 
Toto. 737-2666. 



Money Talks at Public Library 

I/you aren't already convinced that, economically, times 
are tough, come to the Princeton Public Library and look 
over some of the titles in the recent crop of financial advice 
books. The note sounded by most of these books is not "get 
rich quick" optimism. Instead, the reader is instructed in 
how to do well financially despite recession, inflation, and 
energy crises. The emphasis is on keeping ahead of soaring 
prices and general economic chaos. 

Howard Ruff, publisher of "Ruff Times,'' is a good 
example of this with his new book "How to Prosper During 
the Coming Bad Years: A Crash Course in Personal and 
Financial Survival." Ruff bases his advice on the gloomy 
belief that "the worst is yet to come, ' ' and he tells us how to 
make money from such things as gold and silver while 
preparing ourselves in a variety of practical ways for a 
grim future. 

In "New Profits from the Monetary Crisis," Harry 
Browne makes the complex subject of investment readable 
and comprehensible for the average person who hasn't 
much experience in this field. 

Robert Heller's book, "The Naked Investor: Cautions for 
Dealing with the Stock Market," is another for the non- 
professional investor; it warns you to "watch the big boys -- 
the ones who determine the rise or fall of the price-earning 
ratio." 

A similar method of conservative investment is offered 
by Andrew Tobias in "The Only Investment Guide You'll 
Ever Need." Tobias' book is for "people who have gotten 
burned getting rich quick before" ; it tells you how to invest 
safely, if not spectacularly, for a reasonable fixed income. 

The money market is attractive to many small investors 
and those considering it should definitely read "The Money 
Market: Myth, Reality and Practice" by Marcia Stigum. 
This book covers every facet of the money market in an 
attempt to educate the novice about it. 

If real estate investment is more appealing to you than 
the stock market, try "Beating Inflation With Real Estate" 
by the editor of "Housing and Development Reporter," 
Kenneth Harney. In this practical guide, Harney leads you 
through the complexities of real estate for the small in- 
vestor. One reviewer called this "the soundest book on real 
estate in some time. " 

Perhaps your money-saving and money-making attempts 
are generally of a more conservative nature and you simply 
want some guidance on the day-to-day ways you can stop 
your cash from disappearing so rapidly. If that's the case 
read Jane Quinn's "Everyone's Money Book." Quinn 
comprehensively deals with every aspect of money in our 
daily life and offers sensible solutions to financial 
problems. 

"The Inflation Fighter's Big Book: Beat the High Cost of 
Operating Your Home" by Carmen and Brownlee Waschek 
should be read in conjunction with Quinn's book. It 
describes how you can make energy and money-saving 
improvements to your house - an excellent book to read 
before winter strikes. 

-Caroline Champlin 
Princeton Public Library staff 



FRESH CUT 
FLOWERS 

PETERSON'S 

Rt. 206 

Open Everday 9-5 



^WE'LL FIX YOUR 
FAVORITE i&' 
PIPE ^^/ s 

John David Ltd. 
TOBACCONIST 

I Montgomery Shopping Center j 
Rt. 206 



HI 2 



924-8866 i 



PLANT SPRING NOW 



Just 



from 




arrived 



Holland 



BULBS 

TULIPS, DAFFODILS, 
NARCISSUS, CROCUS 

Bulb Planters • Bone Meal • Pots 

COME TO 

ROSEDALE MILLS 

Princeton: 274 Alexander Rd. 924-0134 BJMj 
Pennington: Rt. 69 & W. Del. 737-2008 loo*) 



f SEVEN FLOWERS KESAKUU 




T *■ 



•> 



\ 



SHEETS and COMFORTERS 

Large selection here now for Fall decorating. Sheets $10.75 and up. 

Reversible and washable Comforter $38.00 and up. 

Continental Comforter Covers available. 



The Yard. Lohoska, Pa. 
215-794-5600 

Open doily 10-5. Sun. Hoi. 1-5 



karelia 



20 Nassau St., Pr 
609-921-2460 

Open Doily 10 5